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Fredric Wertham
Fredric Wertham
Fredric Wertham
(/ˈwɜːrθəm/; March 20, 1895 – November 18, 1981) was a German-educated American psychiatrist and author who protested the purportedly harmful effects of violent imagery in mass media and comic books on the development of children.[1] His best-known book was Seduction of the Innocent
Seduction of the Innocent
(1954), which claimed that comic books were dangerous to children. Wertham's criticisms of comic books helped spark a U.S. Congressional inquiry into the comic book industry and the creation of the Comics Code
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Brown V. Board Of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision effectively overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson
Plessy v. Ferguson
decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education. Handed down on May 17, 1954, the Warren Court's unanimous (9–0) decision stated that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution
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Bondage (BDSM)
Bondage is the practice of consensually tying, binding, or restraining a partner for erotic, aesthetic, or somatosensory stimulation. Rope, cuffs, bondage tape, self-adhering bandage, or other physical restraints may be used for this purpose. Bondage itself does not necessarily imply sadomasochism. Bondage may be used as an end into itself, as in the case of rope bondage and breast bondage. It may also be used as a part of sex or in conjunction with other BDSM
BDSM
activities. The letter "B" in the acronym "BDSM" comes from the word "bondage". Sexuality
Sexuality
and erotica are an important aspect in bondage, but are often not the end in itself. Aesthetics
Aesthetics
also plays an important role in bondage. A common reason for the active partner to tie up their partner is so both may gain pleasure from the restrained partner's submission and the feeling of the temporary transfer of control and power
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Shock Illustrated
Shock Illustrated was an American black and white magazine published by EC Comics from late 1955 to early 1956. Part of EC's Picto-Fiction line, each magazine featured three to five stories. The artists drew one to four panels per page with the text overlaid onto the artwork. The first issue appeared with a cover date of September–October 1955 and featured three psychology-themed stories, similar in theme to the comic Psychoanalysis published by EC in 1955. Starting with the second issue this type of story was generally reduced to one per issue, with the remaining stories being similar in theme to those that appeared in EC's comic Shock SuspenStories.[1] Shock Illustrated ran for a total of three issues. The Picto-Fiction magazines lost money from the start, and when EC's distributor went bankrupt, the company had no choice but to cancel the prints. The third issue of this magazine is known as the rarest EC publication of all time
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St. Philip's Episcopal Church (Harlem, New York)
St. Philip's Episcopal Church is an historic Episcopal church located at 204 West 134th Street, between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and Frederick Douglass Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Its congregation was founded in 1809 by free African Americans worshiping at Trinity Church, Wall Street as the Free African Church of St. Philip. First located in the notorious Five Points neighborhood[2], it is the oldest black Episcopal parish in New York City.[3] Historically, it was extremely influential both while located in lower Manhattan and as an institution in Harlem, and many of its members have been leaders in the black community.[3] The first church foundation stone was laid in 1819, and the first rector, serving from 1826 to 1840, was the Rev. Peter Williams, Jr., a leading abolitionist and the first African-American Episcopal priest in New York
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Harlem
Coordinates: 40°48′32.52″N 73°56′54.14″W / 40.8090333°N 73.9483722°W / 40.8090333; -73.9483722HarlemNeighborhood of ManhattanStately Harlem
Harlem
apartment buildings adjacent to Morningside ParkNickname(s): "Heaven", "Black mecca"Motto(s): "Making It!"Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New YorkCity  New YorkFounded 1658Named for Haarlem, NetherlandsArea[1] • Total 10.03 km2 (3.871 sq mi)Population (2000)[2][3][4] • Total 335,109 • Density 33,000/km2 (87,000/sq mi)EconomicsZIP Codes 10026–10027, 10029–10031, 10035, 10037, 10039Area codes 212, 917, 646, 347 Harlem
Harlem
is a large neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City
City
borough of Manhattan
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Superhero
A superhero (sometimes rendered super-hero or super hero) is a type of heroic stock character, usually possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting crime, protecting the public, and usually battling supervillains
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Horror Fiction
Horror is a genre of fiction which is intended to, or has the capacity to frighten, scare, disgust, or startle its readers or viewers by inducing feelings of horror and terror. Literary historian J. A. Cuddon has defined the horror story as "a piece of fiction in prose of variable length... which shocks or even frightens the reader, or perhaps induces a feeling of repulsion or loathing".[1] It creates an eerie and frightening atmosphere. Horror is frequently supernatural, though it can be non-supernatural
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Plastic Man
Plastic Man
Plastic Man
(real name Patrick "Eel" O'Brian) is a superhero originally published by Quality Comics
Quality Comics
and later acquired by DC Comics. Created by cartoonist Jack Cole, Plastic Man
Plastic Man
was one of the first superheroes to incorporate humor into mainstream action storytelling. This character has been published in several solo series and has interacted with other characters in the mainstream DC Universe as a member of the Justice League
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Robin (comics)
Robin
Robin
is the name of several fictional superheroes appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was originally created by Bob Kane, Bill Finger, and Jerry Robinson, to serve as a junior counterpart to the superhero Batman. The character's first incarnation, Dick Grayson, debuted in Detective Comics
Detective Comics
#38 (April 1940). Conceived as a way to attract young readership, Robin garnered overwhelmingly positive critical reception, doubling the sales of the Batman
Batman
related comic books.[1] The early adventures of Robin
Robin
included Star Spangled Comics
Star Spangled Comics
#65–130 (1947–1952), which was the character's first solo feature
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Gay
Gay
Gay
is a term that primarily refers to a homosexual person or the trait of being homosexual. The term was originally used to mean "carefree", "happy", or "bright and showy". The term's use as a reference to homosexuality may date as early as the late 19th century, but its use gradually increased in the 20th century.[1] In modern English, gay has come to be used as an adjective, and as a noun, referring to the people and the practices and cultures associated with homosexuality. In the 1960s, gay became the word favored by homosexual men to describe their sexual orientation.[2] By the end of the 20th century, the word gay was recommended by major LGBT
LGBT
groups and style guides to describe people attracted to members of the same sex.[3][4] At about the same time, a new, pejorative use became prevalent in some parts of the world
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William Moulton Marston
William Moulton Marston
William Moulton Marston
(May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947), also known by the pen name Charles Moulton (/ˈmoʊltən/), was an American psychologist, inventor of an early prototype of the lie detector, self-help author, and comic book writer who created the character Wonder Woman.[1] Two women, his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston, and his partner, Olive Byrne, greatly influenced Wonder Woman's creation.[1][2][3] He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2006.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and career 1.2
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Baltimore, Maryland
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
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Lesbian
A lesbian is a homosexual woman who is romantically or sexually attracted to other women.[1][2] The term lesbian is also used to express sexual identity or sexual behavior regardless of sexual orientation, or as an adjective to characterize or associate nouns with female homosexuality or same-sex attraction.[2][3] The concept of "lesbian", to differentiate women with a shared sexual orientation, is a 20th-century construct. Throughout history, women have not had the same freedom or independence to pursue homosexual relationships as men, but neither have they met the same harsh punishment as homosexual men in some societies. Instead, lesbian relationships have often been regarded as harmless and incomparable to heterosexual ones unless the participants attempted to assert privileges traditionally enjoyed by men. As a result, little in history was documented to give an accurate description of how female homosexuality is expressed
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Reform School
In the United States, a reform school was a penal institution, generally for teenagers. In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and its colonies reformatories were set up from 1830 onwards for youngsters who were convicted of a crime as an alternative to an adult prison. In parallel, "Industrial schools" were set up for vagrants and children needing protection. Both were 'certified' by the government from 1850, and in 1930 the systems merged and both were 'approved' and became approved schools. They were distinct from borstals, (1902-1982 UK)- which were, enclosed juvenile prisons.[1]Contents1 History 2 Modern view 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Social reformers in America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries almost invariably found fault with the then-usual practice of treating juvenile offenders essentially the same as adult criminals
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Correlation Implies Causation
In statistics, many statistical tests calculate correlations between variables and when two variables are found to be correlated, it is tempting to assume that this shows that one variable causes the other.[1][2] That "correlation proves causation," is considered a questionable cause logical fallacy when two events occurring together are taken to have established a cause-and-effect relationship
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