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Frederick Walter Kitchener
Lieutenant-General
Lieutenant-General
Sir Frederick Walter Kitchener, KCB (26 May 1858 – 6 March 1912), known as Walter Kitchener, was a British soldier and colonial administrator. Military career[edit] He was the youngest son of Henry Horatio Kitchener (1805–1894) and his wife Frances Anne Chevallier (1826–1864).[1] In 1876 he followed his older brother Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener
Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener
in taking up a career in the British Army. Initially commissioned an unattached Sub-Lieutenant, he joined the 14th Foot (later the West Yorkshire Regiment) in 1877. He served in the Second Anglo-Afghan War
Second Anglo-Afghan War
as a transport officer to the Kabul Field Force and took part in the first Battle of Charasiah and the battle of Karez Meer
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Hamilton, Bermuda
Hamilton is the capital of the British Overseas Territory
British Overseas Territory
of Bermuda. It is the territory's financial centre and a major port and tourist destination. Its population of 1,010 (2010)[1] is one of the smallest of any capital cities.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Economy 4 Coat of arms and flag 5 Parks 6 Climate 7 Education 8 Sports 9 Transport9.1 Buses10 Notable people10.1 Sport11 Gallery 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] The history of Hamilton as a British city began in 1790 when the Bermuda
Bermuda
government set aside 145 acres (59 ha) for its future seat, and was officially incorporated in 1793 by an Act of Parliament and named for Governor Henry Hamilton. The colony's capital relocated to Hamilton from St. George's in 1815. The city has been at the political and military heart of Bermuda
Bermuda
ever since
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Hinson's Island, Bermuda
Hinson's Island is a small island within the Great Sound, Bermuda of Bermuda. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is part of Paget parish, although it was formerly part of Warwick Parish and is still within the Warwick North constituency. Hinson's Island is the only island in Bermuda served by the government ferry system. The population of Hinson's Island is approximately 50 people. Hinson's (formerly known as Brown's or Godet's) Island is one of the larger islands in the Great Sound. Like its neighbours, it was used as a prisoner of war camp during the Second Boer War, then became the base for Bermuda's first seaplane service. See also[edit]List of lighthouses in BermudaReferences[edit]^ a b c d e f g List of Lights, Pub. 110: Greenland, The East Coasts of North and South America (Excluding Continental U.S.A. Except the East Coast of Florida) and the West Indies (PDF). List of Lights. United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
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Queen's South Africa Medal
The Queen's South Africa
South Africa
Medal is a British campaign medal which was awarded to British and Colonial military personnel, civilians employed in official capacity and war correspondents who served in the Second Boer War in South Africa
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Medal Bar
A medal bar or medal clasp is a thin metal bar attached to the ribbon of a military decoration, civil decoration, or other medal. It most commonly indicates the campaign or operation the recipient received the award for, and multiple bars on the same medal are used to indicate that the recipient has met the criteria for receiving the medal in multiple theatres. When used in conjunction with decorations for exceptional service, such as gallantry medals, the term "and bar" means that the award has been bestowed multiple times. In the example, "Group Captain Leonard Cheshire, VC, OM, DSO and two bars, DFC", "DSO and two bars" means that the Distinguished Service Order
Distinguished Service Order
was awarded on three separate occasions
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King's South Africa Medal
The King's South Africa
South Africa
Medal is a British campaign medal which was awarded to all British and Colonial military personnel who served in the Second Boer War
Second Boer War
in South Africa, who were in the theatre on or after 1 January 1902 and who had completed 18 months service in the conflict prior to 1 June 1902.[1]Contents1 Institution 2 The Second Boer War 3 Award criteria3.1 The medal 3.2 Clasps4 Order of wear4.1 South Africa5 Description 6 See also 7 ReferencesInstitution[edit] The fourth campaign medal for the Second Boer War
Second Boer War
and the second which could be awarded for service in South Africa, the King's South Africa Medal, was instituted in 1902 and was the first British campaign medal to be instituted by King Edward VII
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British India
The Provinces of India, earlier Presidencies of British India
India
and still earlier, Presidency towns, were the administrative divisions of British governance in the subcontinent. Collectively, they were called British India. In one form or another, they existed between 1612 and 1947, conventionally divided into three historical periods:During 1612–1757, the East India Company
East India Company
set up "factories" (trading posts) in several locations, mostly in coastal India, with the consent of the Mughal emperors
Mughal emperors
or local rulers. Its rivals were the merchant trading companies of Holland and France. By the mid-18th century, three "Presidency towns": Madras, Bombay, and Calcutta
Calcutta
had grown in size. During the period of Company rule in India, 1757–1858, the Company gradually acquired sovereignty over large parts of India, now called "Presidencies"
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Lahore Division
Lahore Division was an administrative division of Punjab Province, Pakistan, until the reforms of 2000 abolished the third tier of government. Since divisions were restored back in 2008, the division currently consists on three districts:[2][3]Kasur District Lahore District Nankana Sahib District Sheikhupura DistrictBefore the abolition, it also contained Sheikhupura and Nankana Sahib Districts, with the latter created in 2005. In 2008, both districts left to create Sheikhupura Division.[4] History[edit] Lahore Division was originally an administrative division of the Punjab Province of British India. It extended along the right bank of the Sutlej River from the Himalaya to Multan, and comprised the six districts of Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Lahore, Amritsar, and Gurdaspur
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Governor Of Bermuda
A governor is, in most cases, a public official with the power to govern the executive branch of a non-sovereign or sub-national level of government, ranking under the head of state. In federations, governor may be the title of a politician who governs a constituent state and may be either appointed or elected. The power of the individual governor can vary dramatically between political systems, with some governors having only nominal or largely ceremonial power, while others having a complete control over the entire government. Historically, the title can also apply to the executive officials acting as representatives of a chartered company which has been granted exercise of sovereignty in a colonial area, such as the British East India Company
East India Company
or the Dutch East India
India
Company
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Appendicitis
Appendicitis
Appendicitis
is inflammation of the appendix.[2] Symptoms commonly include right lower abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and decreased appetite.[2] However, approximately 40% of people do not have these typical symptoms.[2] Severe complications of a ruptured appendix include widespread, painful inflammation of the inner lining of the abdominal wall and sepsis.[3] Appendicitis
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Fritz Joubert Duquesne
Frederick "Fritz" Joubert Duquesne (/duːˈkeɪn/; 21 September 1877 – 24 May 1956; sometimes Du Quesne) was a South African Boer
Boer
and German soldier, big-game hunter, journalist, and a spy. He fought on the side of the Boers in the Second Boer
Boer
War and as a secret agent for Germany during both World Wars. He gathered human intelligence, led spy rings and carried out sabotage missions as a covert field asset in South Africa, Great Britain, Central and South America, and the United States. He went by many aliases, fictionalized his identity and background on multiple occasions, and operated as a conman
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Cape Town
Cape Town
Cape Town
(Afrikaans: Kaapstad, [ˈkɑːpstat]; Xhosa: iKapa) is a coastal city in South Africa. It is the second-most populous urban area in South Africa
South Africa
after Johannesburg.[6] It is also the capital and primate city of the Western Cape
Western Cape
province.[7] As the seat of the Parliament of South Africa, it is also the legislative capital of the country.[8] It forms part of the City
City
of Cape Town
Cape Town
metropolitan municipality. The city is famous for its harbour, for its natural setting in the Cape Floristic Region, and for such well-known landmarks as Table Mountain
Table Mountain
and Cape Point
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The Sheboygan Press
The Sheboygan Press is a daily newspaper based in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, United States. It is one of a number of newspapers in the state of Wisconsin owned by the Gannett Company, including the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Green Bay Press-Gazette and Appleton's The Post-Crescent, along with the nearby Herald Times Reporter of Manitowoc. The Sheboygan Press is primarily distributed in Sheboygan County. The Sheboygan Press also publishes the Shoreline Chronicle, a free shopper paper, the Citizen, a weekly free "best-of" edition of the Press, Moxie, which features articles and news about senior citizens, and the Today's Real Estate local realty listings magazine.Contents1 History 2 Images 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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The Atlanta Constitution
A constitution is a set of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is governed.[1] These rules together make up, i.e. constitute, what the entity is. When these principles are written down into a single document or set of legal documents, those documents may be said to embody a written constitution; if they are written down in a single comprehensive document, it is said to embody a codified constitution. Some constitutions (such as the constitution of the United Kingdom) are uncodified, but written in numerous fundamental Acts of a legislature, court cases or treaties.[2] Constitutions concern different levels of organizations, from sovereign states to companies and unincorporated associations. A treaty which establishes an international organization is also its constitution, in that it would define how that organization is constituted
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Josceline Wodehouse
General Sir Josceline Heneage Wodehouse, GCB, CMG (17 July 1852 – 16 January 1930) was a senior British Army officer. Military career[edit] Born the elder son of Vice-Admiral George Wodehouse and educated at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, Wodehouse was commissioned into the Royal Artillery in 1873.[1] He fought in the Anglo-Zulu War in 1879.[2] He became Commandant of the Frontier Field Force in Egypt in 1888
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Temple Chevallier
Temple Chevallier FRAS[1] (19 October 1794 in Badingham, Suffolk – 4 November 1873 in Harrow Weald) was a British clergyman, astronomer, and mathematician. Between 1847 and 1849, he made important observations regarding sunspots. Chevallier has been called "a remarkable Victorian polymath" (Kenworthy, 1994). Not only did he write many papers on astronomy and physics, he also published a translation of the Apostolic Fathers that went into a second edition, and translated the works of Clement of Alexandria, Polycarp and Ignatius of Antioch.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Legacy 4 References 5 Further readingLife[edit] He was educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he was ordained a priest in 1820. He became a Fellow of Pembroke College in 1819
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