HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
[...More...]

"Franks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancien Regime
The Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
(/ˌɒ̃sjæ̃ reɪˈʒiːm/; French: [ɑ̃.sjɛ̃ ʁeʒim]; French for "old regime") was the political and social system of the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
from the Late Middle Ages (circa 15th century) until 1789, when hereditary monarchy and the feudal system of French nobility
French nobility
were abolished by the French Revolution.[1] The Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
was ruled by the late Valois and Bourbon dynasties. The term is occasionally used to refer to the similar feudal systems of the time elsewhere in Europe
[...More...]

"Ancien Regime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Middle Dutch
Middle Dutch is a collective name for a number of closely related West Germanic dialects (whose ancestor was Old Dutch) spoken and written between 1150 and 1500. Until the advent of Modern Dutch
Modern Dutch
after 1500, there was no overarching standard language but the dialects were all mutually intelligible
[...More...]

"Middle Dutch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
[...More...]

"Western Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Javelin
A javelin is a light spear designed primarily to be thrown, historically as a ranged weapon, but today predominantly for sport. The javelin is almost always thrown by hand, unlike the bow and arrow and slingshot, which shoot projectiles from a mechanism. However, devices do exist to assist the javelin thrower in achieving greater distance, generally called spear-throwers. A warrior or soldier armed primarily with one or more javelins is a javelineer. The word javelin comes from Middle English
Middle English
and it derives from Old French javelin, a diminutive of javelot, which meant spear
[...More...]

"Javelin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Old Norwegian
Old Norwegian (Norwegian: gammelnorsk and gam(m)alnorsk), also called Norwegian Norse, is an early form of the Norwegian language
Norwegian language
that was spoken between the 11th and 14th century; it is a transitional stage between Old West Norse
Old West Norse
and Middle Norwegian, and also Old Norn and Old Faroese. Its distinction from Old West Norse
Old West Norse
is a matter of convention
[...More...]

"Old Norwegian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eumenius
Eumenius (born c. 260 CE at the latest, more probably between 230 and 240 CE), was one of the Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman
panegyrists and author of a speech transmitted in the collection of the Panegyrici Latini (Pan. Lat. IX[1]).Contents1 Life 2 Panegyric 3 See also 4 References 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Eumenius was born in Gallia Lugdunensis
Gallia Lugdunensis
at Augustodunum (modern day Autun), the civitas capital of the Celtic Aedui.[2] He was of Greek descent; his grandfather, who had migrated from Athens to Rome, finally settled at Augustodunum as a teacher of rhetoric. Eumenius probably took his fathers place, for it was from Augustodunum that he went to be magister memoriae (private secretary) to the emperor Constantius Chlorus, whom he accompanied on several of his campaigns. In 296 CE, Chlorus determined to restore the famous schools (scholae Maenianae) of Augustodunum
[...More...]

"Eumenius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jacob Grimm
Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm (4 January 1785 – 20 September 1863) also known as Ludwig Karl, was a German philologist, jurist, and mythologist. He is known as the discoverer of Grimm's law (linguistics), the co-author with his brother Wilhelm of the monumental Deutsches Wörterbuch, the author of Deutsche Mythologie and, more popularly, as the elder of the Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
and the editor of Grimm's Fairy Tales.[a]Contents1 Life and books1.1 Meeting von Savigny 1.2 Librarianship 1.3 Later work2 Linguistic work2.1 History
History
of the German Language 2.2 German Grammar 2.3 Grimm's law 2.4 German Dictionary3 Literary work 4 Legal scholarship 5 Politics 6 Works 7 Notes 8 Citations 9 References 10 External linksLife and books[edit] Jacob Grimm
Jacob Grimm
was born in Hanau, in Hesse-Kassel
[...More...]

"Jacob Grimm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Levant
 Cyprus  Israel  Iraq  Jordan  Lebanon  Palestine  Syria   Turkey
Turkey
(Hatay Province)Broader definition Egypt  Greece   Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
(Libya)   Turkey
Turkey
(whole territory)Population 44,550,926[a]Demonym LevantineLanguages Levantine Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Armenian, Circassian, Greek, Kurdish, Ladino, Turkish, DomariTime Zones UTC+02:00 (EET) ( Turkey
Turkey
and Cyprus)Largest citiesDamascus Amman Aleppo Baghdad Beirut Gaza Jerusalem Tel AvivThe Levant
Levant
(/ləˈvænt/) is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean. In its narrowest sense it is equivalent to the historical region of Syria
[...More...]

"Levant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lower Rhine
The Lower Rhine (German: Niederrhein; kilometres 660 to 1,033 of the river Rhine) flows from Bonn, Germany, to the North Sea at Hoek van Holland, Netherlands (including the Nederrijn or "Nether Rhine" within the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta); alternatively, Lower Rhine may be refer to the part upstream of Pannerdens Kop, excluding the Nederrijn. Almost immediately after entering the Netherlands, the Rhine splits into numerous branches. The main branch is called the Waal which flows from Nijmegen to meet the Meuse; after which it is called Merwede. Near Rotterdam the river is known as Nieuwe Maas, and becomes the Nieuwe Waterweg flowing into the North Sea at Hoek van Holland. The downstream Lower Rhine is a low lying land. Up to the beginning of industrialization roughly one fifth of the land area could only be used as pasture: an endless meadow, which could not be farmed because of flooding and a high ground-water level
[...More...]

"Lower Rhine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
[...More...]

"Old Norse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward Gibbon
Edward Gibbon
Gibbon
FRS (/ˈɡɪbən/; 8 May 1737[1] – 16 January 1794)[2] was an English historian, writer and Member of Parliament. His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, was published in six volumes between 1776 and 1788 and is known for the quality and irony of its prose, its use of primary sources, and its open criticism of organised religion.[3]Contents1 Early life: 1737–1752 2 Oxford, Lausanne, and a religious journey: 1752–1758 3 Thwarted romance 4 First fame and the grand tour: 1758–1765 5 Early career: 1765–1776 6
[...More...]

"Edward Gibbon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Marculf
Saint Marcouf (variously spelled Marcoult, Marculf, Marcoul, Marcou), Abbot of Nantus (Nanteuil-en-Cotentin) in the Cotentin, is a saint born in the Saxon colony of Bayeux in Normandy around 500 AD and who is best known for the healing of scrofula. The accounts of his life are merged with that of St. Helier, whom he sent to convert the inhabitants of Jersey to Christianity. He also visited Jersey himself, where miracles are ascribed to him. He died on May 1, 558, in the Îles Saint-Marcouf off the east coast of the Cotentin Peninsula
[...More...]

"Marculf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Christopher Wickham
Christopher John "Chris" Wickham, FBA, FLSW (born 18 May 1950) is a British historian and academic. He is emeritus Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford and Fellow of All Souls College. He was Professor of Early Medieval History at the University of Birmingham from 1997 to 2005.Contents1 Early life 2 Academic career2.1 Scholarship3 Personal life 4 Honours 5 References 6 Published works6.1 Books 6.2 Recent major articles7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Wickham was born on 18 May 1950
[...More...]

"Christopher Wickham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Formulary (model Documents)
Formularies (singular formulary; Latin
Latin
littera(e) formularis, -ares) are medieval collections of models for the execution of documents (acta), public or private; a space being left for the insertion of names, dates, and circumstances peculiar to each case. Their modern equivalent are forms.Contents1 Rationale 2 Early history 3 Various post-Roman traditions 4 Later history 5 Notes 6 SourcesRationale[edit] It is practically inevitable that documents of the same nature, issued from the same office, or even from distinct offices, will bear a close resemblance to one another. Those charged with the execution and expedition of such documents come naturally to employ the same formulæ in similar cases; moreover, the use of such formulæ permits the drafting of important documents to be entrusted to minor officials, since all they have to do is to insert in the allotted space the particular information previously supplied them
[...More...]

"Formulary (model Documents)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alaric I
Alaric I
Alaric I
(/ˈælərɪk/; Gothic: *Alareiks, "ruler of all";[2] Latin: Alaricus; 370 (or 375) – 410 AD) was the first King of the Visigoths
Visigoths
from 395–410, son (or paternal grandson) of chieftain Rothestes.[3] Alaric is best known for his sack of Rome
Rome
in 410, which marked a decisive event in the decline of the Roman Empire. Alaric began his career under the Goth soldiers Gainas and later joined the Roman army. Alaric's first appearance was as the leader of a mixed band of Goths
Goths
and allied peoples who invaded Thrace
Thrace
in 391 and were stopped by the half- Vandal
Vandal
Roman General Stilicho. In 394 he led a Gothic force of 20,000 that helped the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius defeat the Frankish usurper Arbogast at the Battle of Frigidus
[...More...]

"Alaric I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.