HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Franklin Edgerton
Franklin Edgerton (July 24, 1885 – December 7, 1963) was an American[1] linguistic scholar. He was Salisbury Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative Philology at Yale University
Yale University
(1926) and visiting professor at Benares Hindu University
Benares Hindu University
(1953–4). Between 1913 and 1926, he was the Professor of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
at the University of Pennsylvania.[2] He is well known for his exceptionally literal translation of the Bhagavad Gita[3] which was published as volume 38-39 of the Harvard Oriental Series in 1944. He also edited the parallel edition of four recensions of the Simhāsana Dvātrṃśika ("32 Tales of the Throne", also known as Vikrama Charita: "Adventures of Vikrama"), and a reconstruction of the (lost) original Sanskrit text of the Panchatantra.[4][5][6][7] References[edit]^ M. B. Emeneau, "Franklin Edgerton", Language, Vol. 40, No. 2 (Apr
[...More...]

"Franklin Edgerton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Language (journal)
Language is a peer-reviewed quarterly academic journal published by the Linguistic Society of America
Linguistic Society of America
since 1925. It covers all aspects of linguistics, focusing on the area of theoretical linguistics. Its current editor-in-chief is Andries Coetzee (University of Michigan). Under the editorship of Yale linguist Bernard Bloch, Language was the vehicle for publication of many of the important articles of American structural linguistics during the second quarter of the 20th century, and was the journal in which many of the most important subsequent developments in linguistics played themselves out.[citation needed] One of the most famous articles to appear in Language was the scathing 1959 review by the young Noam Chomsky
Noam Chomsky
of the book Verbal Behavior by the behaviorist cognitive psychologist B. F
[...More...]

"Language (journal)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Abu'l-Fazl Ibn Mubarak
Muhammad Hosni El Sayed Mubarak (Arabic: محمد حسني السيد مبارك‎, Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [mæˈħæmmæd ˈħosni (ʔe)sˈsæjjed moˈbɑːɾɑk], Muḥammad Ḥusnī Sayyid Mubārak; born 4 May 1928) is a former Egyptian military and political leader who served as the fourth President of Egypt
President of Egypt
from 1981 to 2011. Before he entered politics, Mubarak was a career officer in the Egyptian Air Force. He served as its commander from 1972 to 1975 and rose to the rank of air chief marshal in 1973.[1] Some time in the 1950s, he returned to the Air Force Academy as an instructor, remaining there until early 1959.[1] He assumed presidency after the assassination of Anwar Sadat
[...More...]

"Abu'l-Fazl Ibn Mubarak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Linguistics
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
[...More...]

"Linguistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Google Books
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
[...More...]

"Google Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Google Scholar
Google
Google
Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text or metadata of scholarly literature across an array of publishing formats and disciplines
[...More...]

"Google Scholar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Horace Arthur Rose
Horace Arthur Rose (1867–1933) was an administrator in the Indian Civil Service and also an author of works related to India in the time of the British Raj. Rose was the son of a merchant from East Grinstead
East Grinstead
and was born on 25 November 1867.[1] He was educated at St Paul's School and at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he arrived from his home in Wallingford, Surrey
Surrey
with the award of a scholarship.[1][2] Rose passed the competitive examination for the Indian Civil Service in 1886 and arrived in India on 4 October 1888
[...More...]

"Horace Arthur Rose" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
[...More...]

"JSTOR" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Comparative Linguistics
Comparative linguistics (originally comparative philology) is a branch of historical linguistics that is concerned with comparing languages to establish their historical relatedness. Genetic relatedness implies a common origin or proto-language and comparative linguistics aims to construct language families, to reconstruct proto-languages and specify the changes that have resulted in the documented languages. To maintain a clear distinction between attested and reconstructed forms, comparative linguists prefix an asterisk to any form that is not found in surviving texts
[...More...]

"Comparative Linguistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bhagavad Gita
The Bhagavad Gita
Bhagavad Gita
(/ˈbʌɡəvəd ˈɡiːtɑː/; Sanskrit: भगवद्गीता, bhagavad-gītā in IAST, Sanskrit pronunciation: [ˈbʱaɡəʋəd̪ ɡiːˈt̪aː], lit. "Song of the Lord"[1]), often referred to as the Gita, is a 700[2][3] verse Hindu
Hindu
scripture in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
that is part of the Hindu epic
Hindu epic
Mahabharata (chapters 23–40 of the 6th book of Mahabharata). The Gita is set in a narrative framework of a dialogue between Pandava prince Arjuna
Arjuna
and his guide and charioteer Lord Krishna
[...More...]

"Bhagavad Gita" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
[...More...]

"Literal Translation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

University Of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly known as Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League research university located in the University City section of Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[5] Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted
[...More...]

"University Of Pennsylvania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Benares Hindu University
Banaras Hindu University
University
(Hindi: [kaʃi hind̪u viʃvəvid̪yaləy], BHU), formerly Central Hindu College, is a public central university located in Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh. It was established in 1916 by Madan Mohan Malaviya.[2] With over 12,000 students residing in campus, it claims the title of largest residential university in Asia.[3] The university's main campus spread over 1,300 acres (5.3 km2) was built on land donated by the Kashi Naresh, the hereditary ruler of Banaras ("Kashi" being an alternative name for Banaras or Varanasi). The Banaras Hindu University, South campus, spread over 2,700 acres (11 km2),[4] hosts the Krishi Vigyan Kendra (Agriculture Science Centre)[5] and is located in Barkachha in Mirzapur district, about 60 km (37 mi) from Banaras
[...More...]

"Benares Hindu University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.