HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

François Rabelais
François Rabelais
François Rabelais
(/ˌræbəˈleɪ/;[1] French: [fʁɑ̃swa ʁablɛ]; between 1483 and 1494 – 9 April 1553) was a French Renaissance writer, physician, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel. Because of his literary power and historical importance, Western literary critics consider him one of the great writers of world literature and among the creators of modern European writing.[2] His literary legacy is such that today, the word Rabelaisian has been coined as a descriptive inspired by his work and life
[...More...]

"François Rabelais" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heresy
Heresy
Heresy
(/ˈhɛrəsi/) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization
[...More...]

"Heresy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Utopia
A utopia (/juːˈtoʊpiə/ yoo-TOH-pee-ə) is an imagined community or society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.[1][2] The opposite of a utopia is a dystopia
[...More...]

"Utopia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guillaume Budé
Guillaume Budé
Guillaume Budé
(Latin: Guilielmus Budaeus; 26 January 1467 – 23 August 1540) was a French scholar.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Budé was born in Paris. He went to the University of Orléans
University of Orléans
to study law, but for several years, being possessed of ample means, he led an idle and dissipated life. When about twenty-four years of age, he was seized with a sudden passion for study, and made rapid progress, particularly in Latin and Greek.[1] The work which gained him greatest reputation was his De Asse et Partibus Eius (1514), a treatise on ancient coins and measures
[...More...]

"Guillaume Budé" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope Clement VII
Pope
Pope
Clement VII (Italian: Papa Clemente VII; Latin: Clemens VII) (26 May 1478 – 25 September 1534), born Giulio di Giuliano de' Medici, was head of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and ruler of the Papal States
Papal States
from 19 November 1523 to his death on 25 September 1534.[1] “The most unfortunate of the Popes,” Clement VII’s reign was marked by a rapid succession of political, military, and religious struggles — many interrelated and long in the making — which had far-reaching consequences for Christianity and world politics. [2] Elected in 1523 at the end of the Italian Renaissance, Clement VII came to the papacy with a high reputation as a statesman, having served as chief advisor to both Pope
Pope
Leo X
Leo X
(1513-1521) and Pope
Pope
Adrian VI (1522-1523)
[...More...]

"Pope Clement VII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Order Of Saint Benedict
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
[...More...]

"Order Of Saint Benedict" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maillezais
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Maillezais
Maillezais
is a commune in the Vendée
Vendée
department in the Pays de la Loire region in western France. It was once an island in the Marais Poitevin, until monks of the Maillezais Abbey
Maillezais Abbey
dug canals in the 13th century
[...More...]

"Maillezais" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lyon
Centre: Parc de la Tête d'Or, Confluence district and the Vieux Lyon. Bottom: Pont Lafayette, Part-Dieu district with the Place Bellecour
Place Bellecour
in foreground during Festival of Lights.FlagCoat of armsMotto(s): Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. (Old Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon
[...More...]

"Lyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hippocrates
Hippocrates
Hippocrates
of Kos
Kos
(Hippokrátēs ho Kṓos; c. 460 – c. 370 BC), also known as Hippocrates
Hippocrates
II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles
Pericles
(Classical Greece), and is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. He is often referred to as the "Father of Medicine"[1][2] in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine
[...More...]

"Hippocrates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Galen
Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (Greek: Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; September 129 AD – c. 200/c. 216), often Anglicized as Galen
Galen
and better known as Galen
Galen
of Pergamon (/ˈɡeɪlən/),[1] was a Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman Empire.[2][3][4] Arguably the most accomplished of all medical researchers of antiquity, Galen
Galen
influenced the development of various scientific disciplines, including anatomy,[5] physiology, pathology,[6] pharmacology,[7] and neurology, as well as philosophy[8] and logic. The son of Aelius Nicon, a wealthy architect with scholarly interests, Galen
Galen
received a comprehensive education that prepared him for a successful career as a physician and philosopher
[...More...]

"Galen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kaballah
Kabbalah
Kabbalah
(Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‬, literally "parallel/corresponding," or "received tradition"[1][2]) is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism
Judaism
is called a Mekubbal (מְקוּבָּל‬). Kabbalah's definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it,[3] from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian, New Age, and Occultist/western esoteric syncretic adaptations. Kabbalah
Kabbalah
is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an unchanging, eternal, and mysterious Ein Sof
Ein Sof
(infinity)[4] and the mortal and finite universe (God's creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a religious denomination in itself. It forms the foundations of mystical religious interpretation
[...More...]

"Kaballah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Prequel
A prequel is a literary, dramatic, or filmic work whose story precedes that of a previous work,[1][2] by focusing on events that occur before the original narrative.[3] A prequel is a work that forms part of a backstory to the preceding work. All "prequels" are, by definition, essentially sequels in that they "expand on a previous or preceding work."[4] The term is a 20th-century neologism that is a portmanteau of the prefix "pre-" (from Latin
Latin
prae, "before") and "sequel".[1][2] Like other sequels, prequels may or may not concern the same plot as the work from which they are derived. Often, they explain the background which led to the events in the original, but sometimes the connections are not as explicit
[...More...]

"Prequel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Collège De Sorbonne
The College
College
of Sorbonne
Sorbonne
(French: Collège de Sorbonne) was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon
Robert de Sorbon
(1201–1274), after whom it was named.[1] With the rest of the Paris colleges, it was suppressed during the French Revolution. It was restored in 1808 but finally closed in 1882
[...More...]

"Collège De Sorbonne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Roman Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Woman Question
"The woman question" is a phrase usually used in connection with a social change in the later half of the 19th century, which questioned the fundamental roles of women in Western industrialized countries such as the United Kingdom, the United States
United States
of America, Canada, and Russia. Issues of women's suffrage, reproductive rights, bodily autonomy, property rights, legal rights, and medical rights, and marriage dominated cultural discussions in newspapers and intellectual circles. While many women were supportive of these changing roles, they did not agree unanimously. Often issues of marriage and sexual freedom were most divisive.[citation needed]Contents1 Context 2 History 3 Areas of discussion 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyContext[edit] "The woman question" originally referred to an academic debate in the 1530s as to whether women should be allowed to study in the universities
[...More...]

"The Woman Question" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.