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François Boucher
François Boucher
François Boucher
(French: [fʁɑ̃swa buʃe]; 29 September 1703 – 30 May 1770) was a French painter, draughtsman and etcher, who worked in the Rococo
Rococo
style. Boucher is known for his idyllic and voluptuous paintings on classical themes, decorative allegories, and pastoral scenes. He was perhaps the most celebrated painter and decorative artist of the 18th century. He also painted several portraits of his patroness, Madame de Pompadour.Contents1 Life 2 Painting 3 Theatrical and tapestry designs 4 Drawings and prints 5 Gallery 6 Works by François Boucher 7 References 8 See also 9 External links 10 External mediaLife[edit] A native of Paris, Boucher was the son of a lesser known painter Nicolas Boucher, who gave him his first artistic training. At the age of seventeen, a painting by Boucher was admired by the painter François Lemoyne
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.orgThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkElevation by Simon FieldhouseBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)Architect Richard Morris Hunt; also Calvert Vaux; Jacob Wrey MouldArchitectural style Beaux-ArtsNRHP reference # 86003556Significant datesAdded to NRHP January 29, 1972[5]Designated NHLJune 24, 1986[6] [7]The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
of New York, colloquially "the Met",[a] is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the second most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. [8] Its permanent collection contains over two million works,[9] divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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Goncourt Brothers
The Goncourt brothers
Goncourt brothers
(French: [ɡɔ̃kuːʁ]) were Edmond de Goncourt ([ɛdmɔ̃], 1822–96) and Jules de Goncourt
Jules de Goncourt
([ʒyl], 1830–70), both French naturalism writers who, as collaborative sibling authors, were inseparable in life.Contents1 Partnership 2 Career 3 Legacy 4 Works4.1 Other5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksPartnership[edit] They formed a partnership that "is possibly unique in literary history. Not only did they write all their books together, they did not spend more than a day apart in their adult lives, until they were finally parted by Jules's death in 1870."[1] They are known for their literary work and for their diaries, which offer an intimate view into the French literary society of the later 19th century. Career[edit] Their career as writers began with an account of a sketching holiday together
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Los Angeles County Museum Of Art
Bus: 20, 217, 720 or 780 to Wilshire Bl and Fairfax Av Future Rail: Wilshire/Fairfax (service begins in approximately 2023)Website www.lacma.orgThe Los Angeles County
Los Angeles County
Museum of Art (LACMA) is an art museum located on Wilshire Boulevard
Wilshire Boulevard
in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles. LACMA
LACMA
is on Museum Row, adjacent to the La Brea Tar Pits
La Brea Tar Pits
(George C. Page Museum). LACMA
LACMA
is the largest art museum in the western United States. It attracts nearly a million visitors annually.[4] It holds more than 150,000 works spanning the history of art from ancient times to the present
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Versailles (city)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Versailles (French pronunciation: ​[vɛʁsɑj]) is a city in the Yvelines
Yvelines
département in Île-de- France
France
region, renowned worldwide for its château, the Château
Château
de Versailles and the gardens of Versailles, designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. According to the 2008 census, the population of the city is 88,641[1] inhabitants, down from a peak of 94,145 in 1975. A new town, founded at the will of King Louis XIV, it was the de facto capital of the Kingdom of France
France
for over a century, from 1682 to 1789, before becoming the cradle of the French Revolution
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Neue Pinakothek
The Neue Pinakothek
Neue Pinakothek
(German: [ˈnɔʏ.ə pinakoˈteːk], New Pinakothek) is an art museum in Munich, Germany. Its focus is European Art of the 18th and 19th century and is one of the most important museums of art of the nineteenth century in the world.[citation needed] Together with the Alte Pinakothek
Alte Pinakothek
and the Pinakothek der Moderne it is part of Munich's "Kunstareal" (the "art area").The new home of the Neue Pinakothek, opened in 1981 Neue Pinakothek
Neue Pinakothek
1880Contents1 The building 2 History 3 Collection 4 Gallery 5 External linksThe building[edit] The museum was founded by the former King Ludwig I of Bavaria
Ludwig I of Bavaria
in 1853. The original building constructed by Friedrich von Gärtner
Friedrich von Gärtner
and August von Voit was destroyed during World War II
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Jean-Baptiste Oudry
Jean-Baptiste Oudry
Jean-Baptiste Oudry
(French: [udʁi]; 17 March 1686 – 30 April 1755) was a French Rococo
Rococo
painter, engraver, and tapestry designer. He is particularly well known for his naturalistic pictures of animals and his hunt pieces depicting game.Contents1 Biography 2 Gallery 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Jean-Baptiste Oudry
Jean-Baptiste Oudry
was born in Paris, the son of Jacques Oudry, a painter and art dealer, and his wife Nicole Papillon,[1] relative of the engraver Jean-Baptiste-Michel Papillon. His father was a director of the Académie de St-Luc art school, which Oudry joined. At first, Oudry concentrated on portraiture, and he became a pupil and perhaps a collaborator of Nicolas de Largillière from 1707 to 1712. He graduated at only 22 years of age, on 21 May 1708, at the same time as his two older brothers
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Biscuit-ware
Bisque porcelain or bisque is a type of unglazed, white porcelain,[1][2] with a matte appearance and texture to the touch. It has been widely used in European pottery, mainly for objects that are not tableware and so do not need a glaze for protection. Although the term "biscuit" is often used to refer to it, bisque is only a subgroup of unglazed biscuit pottery, which for most pottery is a stage after a first firing before a glaze is applied. Small figurines and other decorative pieces have often been made in bisque, as well as larger portrait busts and other sculptures; the appearance of bisque is very similar to that of carved and smoothed marble, the traditional prestige material for sculpture in the West
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Porcelain
Porcelain
Porcelain
/ˈpɔːrsəlɪn, ˈpɔːrslɪn/ is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C (2,200 and 2,600 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain, relative to other types of pottery, arises mainly from vitrification and the formation of the mineral mullite within the body at these high temperatures. Porcelain
Porcelain
slowly evolved in China and was finally achieved (depending on the definition used) at some point about 2,000 to 1,200 years ago, then slowly spread to other East Asian countries, and finally Europe and the rest of the world. Its manufacturing process is more demanding than that for earthenware and stoneware, the two other main types of pottery, and it has usually been regarded as the most prestigious type of pottery for its delicacy, strength, and its white colour
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Choisy-le-Roi
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Choisy-le-Roi is a commune in the Val-de-Marne department in the southeastern suburbs of Paris, France.Contents1 Geography 2 Transport 3 Education 4 Personalities 5 International relations 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] Choisy-le-Roi is located 10.7 km (6.6 mi) southeast from the center of Paris, on both banks of the river Seine
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Palace Of Versailles
The Palace of Versailles
Palace of Versailles
(French: Château
Château
de Versailles), or simply Versailles (English: /vɛərˈsaɪ/ vair-SY or /vərˈsaɪ/ vər-SY; French: [vɛʁsaj]), is a royal château in Versailles in the Île-de-France
Île-de-France
region of France. It is now open as a museum and is a very popular tourist attraction. When the château was built, the community of Versailles was a small village dating from the 11th century. Today, however, it is a wealthy suburb of Paris, some 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of the centre of the French capital.[1] Versailles was the seat of political power in the Kingdom of France
France
from 1682, when King Louis XIV
Louis XIV
moved the royal court from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789, within three months after the beginning of the French Revolution
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Menus-Plaisirs Du Roi
The Menus-Plaisirs du Roi
Menus-Plaisirs du Roi
(French pronunciation: ​[məny pleziʁ dy ʁwa]) was, in the organisation of the French royal household under the Ancien Régime, the department of the Maison du Roi responsible for the "lesser pleasures of the King", which meant in practice that it was in charge of all the preparations for ceremonies, events and festivities, down to the last detail of design and order.Contents1 The controller of the Menus-Plaisirs 2 Design 3 Personnel 4 Expenses 5 Li
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Charles Simon Favart
Charles Simon Favart (13 November 1710 – 12 May 1792) was a French playwright. Born in Paris, the son of a pastry-cook, he was educated at the college of Louis-le-Grand, and after his father's death he carried on the business for a time. His first success in literature was La France delivrée par la Pucelle d'Orléans, a poem about Joan of Arc which obtained a prize of the Académie des Jeux Floraux. After the production of his first vaudeville, Les Deux Jumelles (1734), circumstances enabled him to relinquish business and devote himself entirely to the drama. He provided many pieces anonymously for the lesser theatres, and first put his name to La Chercheuse d'esprit, which was produced in 1741. Among his most successful works were Annette et Lubin, Le Coq du milage (1743), Ninette à la cour (1753), Les Trois Sultanes (1761) and L'Anglais de Bordeaux (1763)
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Denis Diderot
Denis Diderot
Denis Diderot
(French: [dəni did(ə)ʁo]; 5 October 1713 – 31 July 1784) was a French philosopher, art critic, and writer, best known for serving as co-founder, chief editor, and contributor to the Encyclopédie
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Odalisque
An odalisque (Turkish: Odalık) was a chambermaid or a female attendant in a Turkish seraglio, particularly the court ladies in the household of the Ottoman sultan.Contents1 Etymology 2 Origin as the Turkish odalık 3 Later usage of the term in western culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksEtymology[edit]Odalisque painted by Jules Joseph Lefebvre (1874)The word "odalisque" is French in form and originates from the Turkish odalık, meaning "chambermaid", from oda, "chamber" or "room". It can also be transliterated odahlic, odalisk, and odaliq. Joan DelPlato has described the term's shift in meaning from Turkish to English and French:The English and French term odalisque (rarely odalique) derives from the Turkish 'oda', meaning "chamber"; thus an odalisque originally meant a chamber girl or attendant. In western usage, the term has come to refer specifically to the harem concubine
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Eroticism
Eroticism
Eroticism
(from the Greek ἔρως, eros—"desire") is a quality that causes sexual feelings,[1] as well as a philosophical contemplation concerning the aesthetics of sexual desire, sensuality and romantic love. That quality may be found in any form of artwork, including painting, sculpture, photography, drama, film, music or literature. It may also be found in advertising
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