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Frère Jacques
Frère Jacques
Frère Jacques
(/ˌfrɛrə ˈʒɑːkə/, French: [fʁɛʁ ʒɑk], in the nursery rhyme and in song more generally [fʁɛʁə ʒɑkə]; English: "Brother John"; Dutch: "Vader Jacob" (Netherlands) or "Broeder Jacob" (Flanders), German: "Meister Jakob" oder "Bruder Jakob", Italian: "Fra' Martino", Polish: "Panie Janie", Danish: "Mester Jakob", Croatian: "Bratec Martin"), is a nursery rhyme of French origin
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Edward Kilenyi
Edward Kilenyi, Jr. (1910-2000) was a classical pianist. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
on May 7, 1910. His father, Edward Kilenyi, Sr., arrived in the United States from Hungary in 1908, taught music to George Gershwin
George Gershwin
for five years[1] and later wrote music for movies and the Sam Fox music library. Kilenyi studied in Hungary with the composer/pianist Ernő Dohnányi at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, earning a diploma in 1930. He later became a Professor of Music at Florida State University
Florida State University
in Tallahassee, Florida in 1953, four years after Dohnanyi began teaching there. He died on January 6, 2000
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Quarter Note
A quarter note (American) or crotchet (British, from the sense 'hook') is a note played for one quarter of the duration of a whole note (or semibreve). Often, musicians will say that a crotchet is one beat, but this is not always correct, as the beat is indicated by the time signature of the music; a quarter note may or may not be the beat. Quarter notes are notated with a filled-in oval note head and a straight, flagless stem. The stem usually points upwards if it is below the middle line of the stave or downwards if it is on or above the middle line. However, the stem direction may differentiate more than one part. The head of the note also reverses its orientation in relation to the stem. (See image.) Overview[edit] In Unicode, the symbol is U+2669 (♩).A quarter note/crotchet with stem pointing up, a quarter note with stem pointing down, and a quarter restFour quarter notes
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Half Note
In music, a half note (American) or minim (British) is a note played for half the duration of a whole note (or semibreve) and twice the duration of a quarter note (or crotchet). It was given its Latin name (minima, meaning "least or smallest") because it was the shortest of the five note values used in early medieval music notation (Morehen and Rastall 2001). In time signatures with 4 as the bottom number, such as 4 4 or 3 4, the half note is two beats long. However, when 2 is the bottom number (including alla breve, 2 2), the half note is one beat long. Half notes are notated with a hollow oval notehead like a whole note and straight note stem with no flags like a quarter note (see Figure 1). The half rest (or minim rest) denotes a silence of the same duration. Half rests are drawn as filled-in rectangles sitting on top of the middle line of the musical staff, although in polyphonic music the rest may need to be moved to a different line or even a ledger line
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Slavic Review
The Slavic Review is a major peer-reviewed academic journal publishing scholarly studies, book and film reviews, and review essays in all disciplines concerned with Russia, Central Eurasia, and Eastern and Central Europe. The journal's title, though pointing to its roots in Slavic studies, does not fully encompass the range of disciplines represented or peoples and cultures examined. History[edit] The journal has been published quarterly under the current name since 1961 by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (since 2010 named Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, continuing the series published by the same association since 1941 under different names: Slavonic Year-Book. American Series (1941), Slavonic and East European Review
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Culture Of China
Chinese culture
Chinese culture
(simplified Chinese: 中华文化; traditional Chinese: 中華文化; pinyin: Zhōnghuá wénhuà) is one of the world's oldest cultures, originating thousands of years ago.[1][2] The area in which the culture is dominant covers a large geographical region in eastern Asia
Asia
with customs and traditions varying greatly between provinces, cities, and even towns as well. With China
China
being one of the earliest ancient civilizations, Chinese culture
Chinese culture
is extremely diverse and varying, and it has a profound effect in the philosophy, virtue, etiquette and traditions of Asia
Asia
to date.[3] Chinese culture
Chinese culture
is considered the dominant culture in East Asia historically
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Girolamo Frescobaldi
Girolamo Alessandro Frescobaldi
Frescobaldi
(Italian: [dʒiˌɾɔːlamo fɾeskoˈbaldi]; also Gerolamo, Girolimo, and Geronimo Alissandro; September, 1583[1] – 1 March 1643) was a musician from Ferrara, one of the most important composers of keyboard music in the late Renaissance and early Baroque periods. A child prodigy, Frescobaldi studied under Luzzasco Luzzaschi in Ferrara, but was influenced by a large number of composers, including Ascanio Mayone, Giovanni Maria Trabaci, and Claudio Merulo. Girolamo Frescobaldi
Frescobaldi
was appointed organist of St. Peter's Basilica, a focal point of power for the Capella Giulia (a musical organisation) from 21 July 1608 until 1628 and again from 1634 until his death.[2] Frescobaldi's printed collections contain some of the most influential music of the 17th century
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French National Library
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 Famous patrons 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Jean-Philippe Rameau
Jean-Philippe Rameau
Jean-Philippe Rameau
(French: [ʒɑ̃filip ʁamo]; (1683-09-25)25 September 1683 – (1764-09-12)12 September 1764) was one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the 18th century.[1] He replaced Jean-Baptiste Lully
Jean-Baptiste Lully
as the dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer for the harpsichord of his time, alongside François Couperin.[2] Little is known about Rameau's early years, and it was not until the 1720s that he won fame as a major theorist of music with his Treatise on Harmony (1722) and also in the following years as a composer of masterpieces for the harpsichord, which circulated throughout Europe. He was almost 50 before he embarked on the operatic career on which his reputation chiefly rests today
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Charles Lebouc
Charles Joseph Lebouc (22 December 1822, Besançon – 6 March 1893, Hyères) was a French cellist. He attended the Conservatoire in Paris where he studied under Olive Charlier Vaslin (1794–1889) and then Louis Norblin, and later became a cello professor. He played chamber music. He composed some pieces for the cello with piano accompaniment and also wrote "Méthode complete et pratique de Violoncelle." He won first prize in cello in 1842 when he was a student of Auguste Franchomme, and first prize in harmony in 1844 as a student of Fromental Halévy. In later years he organized annual private concerts on Shrove Tuesday, and on this occasion in 1886 (9 March) the first performance of the musical divertissement, Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saëns was given, in which Lebouc played the well-known cello solo, The Swan.[1] References[edit]^ Sabina Teller Ratner (25 April 2002)
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