HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Foul Pole
A baseball field, also called a ball field or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played. The term can also be used as a metonym for a baseball park.Contents1 Specifications 2 First base 3 Second base 4 Third base 5 Home plate 6 Batter's box
Batter's box
and catcher's box 7 Foul poles 8 Pitcher's mound 9 Baseline9.1 Running baseline 9.2 Running lane10 Grass line 11 Outfield 12 Warning track 13 Outfield wall 14 Bullpen 15 On-deck
On-deck
circles 16 Coach's boxes 17 History 18 Maintenance 19 Honors and awards 20 See also 21 References 22 External linksSpecifications[edit]This section appears to contradict itself on what "the infield" means. Please see the talk page for more information
[...More...]

"Foul Pole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

San Diego
San Diego
San Diego
(/ˌsæn diˈeɪɡoʊ/; Spanish for 'Saint Didacus'; Spanish: [san ˈdjeɣo]) is a major city in California, United States. It is in San Diego
San Diego
County, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, approximately 120 miles (190 km) south of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and immediately adjacent to the border with Mexico. With an estimated population of 1,406,630 as of July 1, 2016,[9] San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States
United States
and second-largest in California
[...More...]

"San Diego" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

2006 Major League Baseball Season
The 2006 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
season ended with the National League's St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
winning the World Series
World Series
with the lowest regular season victory total in a non-strike season in history. The American League continued its domination at the All-Star Game by winning its fourth straight game; the A.L. has won nine of the last ten contests (the 2002 game was a tie). This season, the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
failed to qualify for the postseason for the first time since 1990
[...More...]

"2006 Major League Baseball Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pentagon
In geometry, a pentagon (from the Greek πέντε pente and γωνία gonia, meaning five and angle[1]) is any five-sided polygon or 5-gon. The sum of the internal angles in a simple pentagon is 540°. A pentagon may be simple or self-intersecting
[...More...]

"Pentagon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bob Keating
Robert M. Keating (September 22, 1862 – January 19, 1922), was a Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles. He appeared in one game for the Orioles on August 27, 1887—pitching a complete game, allowing 16 runs on 16 hits in the loss. An arm injury ended his career and he became an inventor, starting off by inventing various shaving devices.1896 ad for Keating bicyclesIn 1897, he started the R.M. Keating Company which manufactured bicycles, through his Keating Wheel Works subsidiary
[...More...]

"Bob Keating" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chain-link Fence
A chain-link fence (also referred to as wire netting, wire-mesh fence, chain-wire fence, cyclone fence, hurricane fence, or diamond-mesh fence) is a type of woven fence usually made from galvanized or LLDPE-coated steel wire. The wires run vertically and are bent into a zig-zag pattern so that each "zig" hooks with the wire immediately on one side and each "zag" with the wire immediately on the other. This forms the characteristic diamond pattern seen in this type of fence.Contents1 Development of chain-link fencing 2 Sizes and uses 3 Installation 4 Manufacturing 5 Notable uses 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksDevelopment of chain-link fencing[edit]A chain-link privacy fence topped with razor wire protecting a utility power substation.In the United Kingdom, the firm of Barnard, Bishop & Barnard was established in Norwich
Norwich
to produce chain-link fencing by machine
[...More...]

"Chain-link Fence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

David Ortiz
David Américo Ortiz Arias (born November 18, 1975), nicknamed "Big Papi," is a former Dominican American professional baseball designated hitter (DH) and occasional first baseman who played 20 Major League Baseball (MLB) seasons, primarily with the Boston Red Sox, but also with the Minnesota Twins. During his 14 seasons with the Red Sox, he was a ten-time All-Star, a three-time World Series
World Series
champion, and seven-time Silver Slugger
Silver Slugger
winner. Ortiz also holds the Red Sox single-season record for home runs with 54, which he set during the 2006 season. Originally signed by the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
in 1992, Ortiz was traded to the Twins in 1996, where he played six seasons. Ortiz was released by the Twins and signed with the Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
in 2003, where he spent the remainder of his career
[...More...]

"David Ortiz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Boston Red Sox
The Boston
Boston
Red Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) East division. The Red Sox have won eight World Series
World Series
championships and have played in twelve. Founded in 1901 as one of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Red Sox' home ballpark has been Fenway Park
Fenway Park
since 1912. The "Red Sox" name was chosen by the team owner, John I
[...More...]

"Boston Red Sox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

U.S. Cellular Field
Guaranteed Rate
Guaranteed Rate
Field is a baseball park located in Chicago, Illinois, that serves as the home ballpark for the Chicago
Chicago
White Sox
White Sox
of Major League Baseball. The facility is owned by the state of Illinois through the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority, and is operated by the White Sox. The park opened for the 1991 season, after the White Sox had spent 81 years at the original Comiskey Park. It also opened with the name Comiskey Park
Comiskey Park
but was renamed U.S. Cellular
U.S. Cellular
Field in 2003 after U.S. Cellular
U.S

[...More...]

"U.S. Cellular Field" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chicago White Sox
The Chicago
Chicago
White Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago. The White Sox compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division. Home games are held at Guaranteed Rate Field, located on the city's South Side, and the team is owned by Jerry Reinsdorf. They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago
Chicago
Cubs, who are a member of the National League
National League
(NL) Central division. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the franchise was established as a major league baseball club in 1901. The club was originally called the Chicago
Chicago
White Stockings, but this was soon shortened to Chicago
Chicago
White Sox
[...More...]

"Chicago White Sox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Batting (baseball)
In baseball, batting is the act of facing the opposing pitcher and trying to produce offense for one's team. A batter or hitter is a person whose turn it is to face the pitcher. The three main goals of batters are to become a baserunner, drive runners home, or advance runners along the bases for others to drive home, but the techniques and strategies they use to do so vary. Hitting uses a motion that is virtually unique to baseball, one that is rarely used in other sports. Hitting is unique because unlike most sports movements in the vertical plane of movement hitting involves rotating in the horizontal plane.[1]Contents1 Goals 2 Success in batting 3 Strategy 4 Warming up 5 The lineup 6 Types of hitters 7 History of the bat 8 Types of bats 9 Bat design 10 Bat manufacture 11 See also 12 References 13 Further readingGoals[edit] In general, batters try to get hits. However, their primary objective is to avoid making an out, and helping their team to score runs
[...More...]

"Batting (baseball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Third Baseman
A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'. The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory. Third base is known as the "hot corner", because the third baseman is relatively close to the batter and most right-handed hitters tend to hit the ball hard in this direction
[...More...]

"Third Baseman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pitch (baseball)
In baseball, a pitch is the act of throwing a baseball toward home plate to start a play. The term comes from the Knickerbocker Rules. Originally, the ball had to be literally "pitched" underhand, as with pitching horseshoes. Overhand throwing was not allowed until 1884. The biomechanics of pitching have been studied extensively. The phases of throwing include windup, early cocking, late cocking, early acceleration, late acceleration, deceleration, and follow-through.[1] Pitchers throw a variety of pitches, each of which has a slightly different velocity, trajectory, movement, hand position, wrist position and/or arm angle. These variations are introduced to confuse the batter in various ways, and ultimately aid the defensive team in getting the batter or baserunners out. To obtain variety, and therefore enhance defensive baseball strategy, the pitcher manipulates the grip on the ball at the point of release
[...More...]

"Pitch (baseball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pitcher
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and closer. Traditionally, the pitcher also bats. Starting in 1973 with the American League
American League
and spreading to further leagues throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy
[...More...]

"Pitcher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chalk
Chalk
Chalk
( /ˈtʃɔːk/) is a soft, white, porous, sedimentary carbonate rock, a form of limestone composed of the mineral calcite. Calcite
Calcite
is an ionic salt called calcium carbonate or CaCO3. It forms under reasonably deep marine conditions from the gradual accumulation of minute calcite shells (coccoliths) shed from micro-organisms called coccolithophores. Flint
Flint
(a type of chert) is very common as bands parallel to the bedding or as nodules embedded in chalk. It is probably derived from sponge spicules or other siliceous organisms as water is expelled upwards during compaction
[...More...]

"Chalk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.