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Fort Conde
Fort Conde, located in Mobile, Alabama, United States
United States
is a reconstruction, at 4/5 scale, as a third of the original 1720s French Fort Condé at the site. The original fort was also known as Fort Charlotte under French, British and American rule and Fort Carlota under Spanish rule [1] The current Fort Conde, spanning almost 1/3 of the original fort, was recreated at 4/5-scale on the site.[1] The new Fort Conde
Fort Conde
was opened on July 4, 1976, as part of Mobile's celebration of the United States bicentennial
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Fort De Condé-sur-Aisne
The Fort de Condé, or Fort Pille, is a fortification of the Séré de Rivières system, built in France
France
between 1877 and 1883 to defend the area between Soissons
Soissons
and Laon. It is located on the heights of the confluence of the Aisne and the Vesle
Vesle
near the communes of Condé-sur-Aisne
Condé-sur-Aisne
and Chivres-Val. Although the fort was considered obsolete at the start of World War I, its command of strategic ground made it a coveted objective throughout the war, changing hands several times. Following the war it was used in support service before its abandonment and purchase by a local community
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King George III
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738[c] – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain
King of Great Britain
and King of Ireland
King of Ireland
from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick- Lüneburg
Lüneburg
("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
before becoming King of Hanover
King of Hanover
on 12 October 1814
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Battle Of Spanish Fort
Coordinates: 30°41′3.4″N 87°54′58.95″W / 30.684278°N 87.9163750°W / 30.684278; -87.9163750Battle of Spanish FortPart of the American Civil WarDate March 27 – April 8, 1865 (1865-04-08)Location Baldwin County, AlabamaResult Union victoryBelligerents United States
United States
(Union) CSA (Confederacy)Commanders and leadersE.R.S. Canby Randall L. Gibson[1]Units involvedArmy of West Mississippi Spanish Fort GarrisonStrength30,000 2,500Casualties and losses657 744v t eMobile CampaignSpanish Fort Fort BlakelyThe Battle of Spanish Fort
Battle of Spanish Fort
took place from March 27 to April 8, 1865 in Baldwin County, Alabama, as part of the Mobile Campaign of the Western Theater of the American Civil War. After the Union victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay, Mobile nevertheless remained in Confederate hands
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Battle Of Fort Blakeley
Coordinates: 30°44′32.67″N 87°55′37.34″W / 30.7424083°N 87.9270389°W / 30.7424083; -87.9270389Battle of Fort BlakeleyPart of the American Civil WarStorming of Fort BlakeleyDate April 2, 1865 – April 9, 1865Location Baldwin County, AlabamaResultUnion victoryFort Blakeley surrendered to the U.S.Belligerents United States
United States
(Union) CSA (Confederacy)Commanders and leadersEdward Canby St. John R
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Fleur De Lis
The fleur-de-lis/fleur-de-lys (plural: fleurs-de-lis/fleurs-de-lys)[pron 1] or flower-de-luce is a stylized lily (in French, fleur means "flower", and lis means "lily") that is used as a decorative design or motif, and many of the Catholic
Catholic
saints of France, particularly St. Joseph, are depicted with a lily
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Bastion
A bastion or bulwark is a structure projecting outward from the curtain wall of a fortification, most commonly angular in shape and positioned at the corners. The fully developed bastion consists of two faces and two flanks with fire from the flanks being able to protect the curtain wall and also the adjacent bastions.[1] It is one element in the style of fortification dominant from the mid 16th to mid 19th centuries. Bastion
Bastion
fortifications offered a greater degree of passive resistance and more scope for ranged defense in the age of gunpowder artillery compared with the medieval fortifications they replaced.Contents1 Evolution 2 Effectiveness 3 Types 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further readingEvolution[edit] By the middle of the 15th century, artillery pieces had become powerful enough to make the traditional medieval round tower and curtain wall obsolete
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Dauphin Island
Dauphin Island is a town in Mobile County, Alabama, United States, on a barrier island of the same name (split by the Katrina Cut), at the Gulf of Mexico. It incorporated in 1988.[5] The population was 1,238 at the 2010 census. The town is included in the Mobile metropolitan statistical area. The island (originally named "Massacre Island") was renamed for Louis XIV of France's great-grandson and heir, the dauphin, the future Louis XV of France. The name of the island is often mistaken as "Dolphin Island"; dauphin is "dolphin" in the French language. The Gulf of Mexico
Gulf of Mexico
is to the south of the island; the Mississippi Sound and Mobile Bay
Mobile Bay
are to the north. The island's eastern end helps define the mouth of Mobile Bay
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New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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French Quarter
The French Quarter, also known as the Vieux Carré ("Old Square") or Vieux Carré Historic District, is the oldest section of the City of New Orleans. Founded in 1718 by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, New Orleans
New Orleans
developed around the Vieux Carré, the city's central square. Today, the district is commonly known as the French Quarter, or simply "the Quarter," a reflection of the diminished French influence after the Louisiana
Louisiana
Purchase.[3] Most extant historical buildings were constructed in the late 1700s, during a period of Spanish rule, or during the early 1800s, after U.S. annexation and statehood. The district is a National Historic Landmark, and numerous contributing buildings have received separate designations of significance
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Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
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Adrien De Pauger
Adrien de Pauger
Adrien de Pauger
(died 9 June 1726)[1] was the French engineer and cartographer who designed the streets of the Vieux Carre, today known as the "French Quarter", and drew the original map of the city that became New Orleans, Louisiana. De Pauger was appointed in 1720 by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville
to draw up the plans for the new city. De Pauger arrived in the settlement on March 29, 1721
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Dormer
A dormer is a roofed structure, often containing a window, that projects vertically beyond the plane of a pitched roof.[1] It is also known as rooftop window. Dormers are commonly used to increase the usable space in a loft and to create window openings in a roof plane.[2] The term "dormer" is commonly used to refer to a "dormer window" although a dormer does not necessarily contain a window. A dormer is often one of the primary elements of a loft conversion. As a prominent element of many buildings, different types of dormer have evolved to complement different styles of architecture
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Mansard
A mansard or mansard roof (also called a French roof or curb roof) is a four-sided gambrel-style hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its sides with the lower slope, punctured by dormer windows, at a steeper angle than the upper.[1][2][3] The steep roof with windows creates an additional floor of habitable space[4] (a garret), and reduces the overall height of the roof for a given number of habitable stories. The upper slope of the roof may not be visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building. The earliest known example of a mansard roof is credited to Pierre Lescot on part of the Louvre
Louvre
built around 1550
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Castillo De San Marcos
The Castillo de San Marcos
Castillo de San Marcos
is the oldest masonry fort in the continental United States. Located on the western shore of Matanzas Bay in the city of St. Augustine, Florida, the fort was designed by the Spanish engineer Ignacio Daza.[1][2] Construction began in 1672,[3] 107 years after the city's founding by Spanish Admiral
Admiral
and conquistador Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, when Florida
Florida
was part of the Spanish Empire
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Demolition
Demolition
Demolition
is the tearing down of buildings and other man-made structures. Demolition
Demolition
contrasts with deconstruction, which involves taking a building apart while carefully preserving valuable elements for re-use purposes. For small buildings, such as houses, that are only two or three stories high, demolition is a rather simple process. The building is pulled down either manually or mechanically using large hydraulic equipment: elevated work platforms, cranes, excavators or bulldozers. Larger buildings may require the use of a wrecking ball, a heavy weight on a cable that is swung by a crane into the side of the buildings. Wrecking balls are especially effective against masonry, but are less easily controlled and often less efficient than other methods. Newer methods may use rotational hydraulic shears and silenced rock-breakers attached to excavators to cut or break through wood, steel, and concrete
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