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Formetanate
Formetanate
Formetanate
is an insecticide and acaricide.[1] It is used on alfalfa grown for seed and on some fruits, including citrus, pome, and stone fruits.[2] See also[edit]FormparanateExternal links[edit] Formetanate
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Chemical Nomenclature
A chemical nomenclature is a set of rules to generate systematic names for chemical compounds. The nomenclature used most frequently worldwide is the one created and developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The IUPAC's rules for naming organic and inorganic compounds are contained in two publications, known as the Blue Book[1] and the Red Book,[2] respectively. A third publication, known as the Green Book,[3] describes the recommendations for the use of symbols for physical quantities (in association with the IUPAP), while a fourth, the Gold Book,[4] contains the definitions of a large number of technical terms used in chemistry. Similar compendia exist for biochemistry[5] (the White Book, in association with the IUBMB), analytical chemistry[6] (the Orange Book), macromolecular chemistry[7] (the Purple Book) and clinical chemistry[8] (the Silver Book)
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Paris Green
Paris green
Paris green
(copper(II) acetate triarsenite or copper(II) acetoarsenite) is an inorganic compound. It is a highly toxic emerald-green crystalline powder[3] that has been used as a rodenticide and insecticide,[4] and also as a pigment, despite its toxicity. It is also used as a blue colorant for fireworks.[5] The color of Paris green
Paris green
is said to range from a pale blue green when very finely ground, to a deeper green when coarsely ground.Contents1 Preparation 2 Uses2.1 Insecticide 2.2 Pigment2.2.1 Related pigments3 See also 4 Gallery 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksPreparation[edit] Paris green
Paris green
may be prepared by combining copper(II) acetate and arsenic trioxide.[6] Uses[edit] Insecticide[edit] At the turn of the 20th century, Paris green, blended with lead arsenate, was used in America and elsewhere as an insecticide on produce such as apples
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Inorganic Compound
A chemical compound is termed inorganic if it fulfills one or more of the following criteria:most of them do not contain carbon It cannot be found or incorporated into a living organismThere is no clear or universally agreed-upon distinction between organic and inorganic compounds
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Aluminium Phosphide
Aluminium
Aluminium
phosphide (aluminum phosphide) is a highly toxic inorganic compound with the chemical formula AlP used as a wide band gap semiconductor and a fumigant
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Boric Acid
Boric acid, also called hydrogen borate, boracic acid, orthoboric acid and acidum boricum, is a weak, monobasic Lewis acid
Lewis acid
of boron, which is often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, neutron absorber, or precursor to other chemical compounds
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Chromated Copper Arsenate
Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a wood preservative that has been used for timber treatment since the mid-1930s. It is a mix of chromium, copper and arsenic (as Copper(II) arsenate) formulated as oxides or salts, and is recognizable for the greenish tint it imparts to timber. CCA was invented in 1933 by Dr. Sonti Kamesam, an Indian scientist, and was awarded its first patent (British) in 1934.[1] CCA is known by many trade names and is the world’s most widely used wood preservative
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Copper(II) Arsenate
Copper
Copper
arsenate (Cu3(AsO4)2.4H2O, or Cu5H2(AsO4)4.2H2O), also called copper orthoarsenate, tricopper arsenate, cupric arsenate, or tricopper orthoarsenate, is a blue or bluish-green powder insoluble in water and alcohol and soluble in aqueous ammonium and dilute acids. Its CAS number is 7778-41-8 or 10103-61-4.Contents1 Uses 2 Natural occurrences 3 Related compounds 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUses[edit] Copper
Copper
arsenate is an insecticide used in agriculture. It is also used as a herbicide, fungicide, and a rodenticide
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Copper(I) Cyanide
Copper(I) cyanide
Copper(I) cyanide
is an inorganic compound with the formula CuCN. This off-white solid occurs in two polymorphs; impure samples can be green due to the presence of Cu(II) impurities. The compound is useful as a catalyst, in electroplating copper, and as a reagent in the preparation of nitriles.[3]Contents1 Structure 2 Preparation 3 Reactions 4 Applications4.1 Organic synthesis5 References 6 External linksStructure[edit] Copper
Copper
cyanide is a coordination polymer. It exists in two polymorphs both of which contain -[Cu-CN]- chains made from linear copper(I) centres linked by cyanide bridges
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Diatomaceous Earth
Diatomaceous earth
Diatomaceous earth
( /ˌdaɪ.ətəˌmeɪʃəs ˈɜːrθ/), also known as D.E., diatomite, or kieselgur/kieselguhr, is a naturally occurring, soft, siliceous sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 micrometres to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an abrasive feel, similar to pumice powder, and has a low density as a result of its high porosity. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% silica, with 2 to 4% alumina (attributed mostly to clay minerals) and 0.5 to 2% iron oxide.[1] Diatomaceous earth
Diatomaceous earth
consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled protist (chrysophytes)
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Lead Hydrogen Arsenate
Lead
Lead
hydrogen arsenate, also called lead arsenate, acid lead arsenate or LA, chemical formula PbHAsO4, is an inorganic insecticide used primarily against the potato beetle.Contents1 Chemistry 2 Uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksChemistry[edit] It is usually produced using the following reaction:Pb(NO3)2(aq) +H3AsO4(aq) → PbHAsO4(s) +2HNO3(aq) Lead
Lead
arsenate was the most extensively used arsenical insecticide.[1] Two principal formulations of lead arsenate were marketed: basic lead arsenate (Pb5OH(AsO4)3, CASN: 1327-31-7) and acid lead arsenate (PbHAsO4, CASN: 7784-40-9).[1] Until the 1930s-1940s, lead arsenate was frequently prepared by farmers at home, by reacting soluble lead salts with sodium arsenate. Uses[edit] As an insecticide, it was first used against the gypsy moth in Massachusetts, as a less soluble and less toxic alternative to then-used Paris Green
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Scheele's Green
Scheele's Green, also called Schloss Green, is chemically a cupric hydrogen arsenite (also called copper arsenite or acidic copper arsenite), CuHAsO 3. It is chemically related to Paris Green. It is a yellowish-green pigment which in the past was used in some paints, but has since fallen out of use because of its toxicity and the instability of its color in the presence of sulfides and various chemical pollutants. Scheele's Green
Scheele's Green
was invented in 1775 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele.[2] By the end of the 19th century, it had virtually replaced the older green pigments based on copper carbonate.Contents1 Preparation 2 Uses 3 Toxicity 4 Role in Napoleon's death 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPreparation[edit] The pigment was originally prepared by making a solution of sodium carbonate at a temperature of around 90 °C, then slowly adding arsenious oxide, while constantly stirring until everything had dissolved
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CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
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Insect Growth Regulator
Regulator may refer to:Contents1 Technology 2 Science 3 Music and literature 4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoTechnology[edit] Regulator (automatic control), a device that maintains a designated characteristic, as in:Battery regulator Pressure regulator Diving regulator Voltage regulator Regulator (sewer), a control device used in a combined sewer system A device in mechanical watches attached to the balance spring for adjusting the rate of the b
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Benzoylurea
Benzoylureas are chemical derivatives of N-benzoyl-N′-phenylurea (benzoylurea). They are best known for their use as insecticides. They act as insect growth regulators by inhibiting synthesis of chitin in the insect's body. One of the more commonly used benzoylurea pesticides is diflubenzuron. Others include chlorfluazuron, flufenoxuron, hexaflumuron, and triflumuron. Lufenuron
Lufenuron
is the active compound in flea control medication for pet dogs and cats. Certain types of benzoylurea compounds[which?] have been investigated as potential anticancer agents. Environmental toxicity[edit] When applied in a dispersed way, for example through fumigation or spraying, these chemicals have an effect against a wide range of insect species, some of which may be beneficial to human activities, including crop-pollinators such as bees
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Diflubenzuron
Diflubenzuron
Diflubenzuron
is an insecticide of the benzoylurea class. It is used in forest management and on field crops[2] to selectively control insect pests, particularly forest tent caterpillar moths, boll weevils, gypsy moths, and other types of moths.[1] It is widely used larvicide in India for control of mosquito larvae by public health authorities. Diflubenzuron
Diflubenzuron
is approved by the WHO Pesticide Evaluation Scheme.[1]Contents1 Mechanism of action 2 Environmental toxicity 3 Commercial uses 4 ReferencesMechanism of action[edit] The mechanism of action of diflubenzuron involves inhibiting the production of chitin which is used by an insect to build its exoskeleton
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