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Ford–fulkerson Algorithm
The Ford–Fulkerson method or Ford–Fulkerson algorithm
Ford–Fulkerson algorithm
(FFA) is a greedy algorithm that computes the maximum flow in a flow network. It is called a "method" instead of an "algorithm" as the approach to finding augmenting paths in a residual graph is not fully specified[1] or it is specified in several implementations with different running times.[2] It was published in 1956 by L. R. Ford, Jr. and D. R. Fulkerson.[3] The name "Ford–Fulkerson" is often also used for the Edmonds–Karp algorithm, which is a fully defined implementation of the Ford–Fulkerson method. The idea behind the algorithm is as follows: as long as there is a path from the source (start node) to the sink (end node), with available capacity on all edges in the path, we send flow along one of the paths. Then we find another path, and so on
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Greedy Algorithm
A greedy algorithm is an algorithmic paradigm that follows the problem solving heuristic of making the locally optimal choice at each stage[1] with the hope of finding a global optimum. In many problems, a greedy strategy does not in general produce an optimal solution, but nonetheless a greedy heuristic may yield locally optimal solutions that approximate a global optimal solution in a reasonable time. For example, a greedy strategy for the traveling salesman problem (which is of a high computational complexity) is the following heuristic: "At each stage visit an unvisited city nearest to the current city". This heuristic need not find a best solution, but terminates in a reasonable number of steps; finding an optimal solution typically requires unreasonably many steps
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Canadian Journal Of Mathematics
The Canadian Journal of Mathematics
Mathematics
(French: Journal canadien de mathématiques; print: ISSN 0008-414X, online: ISSN 1496-4279) is a bimonthly mathematics journal published by the Canadian Mathematical Society. It was established in 1949 by H.S.M. Coxeter and G. de B. Robinson.[1] The current editors-in-chief of the journal are Louigi Addario-Berry and Eyal Goren. [2] The journal publishes articles in all areas of mathematics. References[edit]^ Biographical information about Robinson on CMS web site, retrieved 2009-04-13. ^ "CJM editorial board". Canadian Mathematical Society. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 2017-02-01. External links[edit]Official websiteThis article about a mathematics journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
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Turn Restriction Routing
A routing algorithm decides the path followed by a packet from the source to destination routers in a network. An important aspect to be considered while designing a routing algorithm is avoiding a deadlock. Turn restriction routing[1][2] is a routing algorithm for mesh-family of topologies which avoids deadlocks by restricting the types of turns that are allowed in the algorithm while determining the route from source node to destination node in a network.Fig 1: Figure shows four channels with both input and output buffers full. All packets in output buffers are to be forwarded to next channel. But since their input buffers are full, this forwarding cannot take place
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Approximate Max-flow Min-cut Theorem
Approximate max-flow min-cut theorems are mathematical propositions in network flow theory. They deal with the relationship between maximum flow rate ("max-flow") and minimum cut ("min-cut") in a multi-commodity flow problem
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Oreilly Media
O'Reilly Media
O'Reilly Media
(formerly O'Reilly & Associates) is an American media company established by Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
that publishes books and Web sites and produces conferences on computer technology topics
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Introduction To Algorithms
Introduction to Algorithms
Introduction to Algorithms
is a book by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. The first edition of the book was widely used as the textbook for algorithms courses at many universities[1] and is commonly cited as a reference for algorithms in published papers, with over 10000 citations documented on CiteSeerX.[2] The book sold half a million copies during its first 20 years.[3] Its fame has led to the common use of the abbreviation "CLRS" (Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, Stein), or, in the first edition, "CLR" (Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest).[4] In the preface, the authors write about how the book was written to be comprehensive and useful in both teaching and professional environments. Each chapter focuses on an algorithm, and discusses its design techniques and areas of application. Instead of using a specific programming language, the algorithms are written in Pseudocode
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Clifford Stein
Clifford Seth Stein (born December 14, 1965), a computer scientist, is a professor of industrial engineering and operations research at Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York, NY, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Computer Science. Stein is chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department at Columbia University
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Ronald L. Rivest
Ronald Linn Rivest (/rɪˈvɛst/;[5][6] born May 6, 1947) is a cryptographer and an Institute Professor at MIT.[2] He is a member of MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Computer Science
(EECS) and a member of MIT's Computer Science
Computer Science
and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He was a member of the Election Assistance Commission's Technical Guidelines Development Committee, tasked with assisting the EAC in drafting the Voluntary Voting
Voting
System Guidelines.[7] Rivest is one of the inventors of the RSA algorithm (along with Adi Shamir and Len Adleman).[1] He is the inventor of the symmetric key encryption algorithms RC2, RC4, RC5, and co-inventor of RC6. The "RC" stands for "Rivest Cipher", or alternatively, "Ron's Code"
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Charles E. Leiserson
Charles Eric Leiserson is a computer scientist, specializing in the theory of parallel computing and distributed computing, and particularly practical applications thereof. As part of this effort, he developed the Cilk multithreaded language. He invented the fat-tree interconnection network, a hardware-universal interconnection network used in many supercomputers, including the Connection Machine
Connection Machine
CM5, for which he was network architect. He helped pioneer the development of VLSI theory, including the retiming method of digital optimization with James B. Saxe and systolic arrays with H. T. Kung. He conceived of the notion of cache-oblivious algorithms, which are algorithms that have no tuning parameters for cache size or cache-line length, but nevertheless use cache near-optimally
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Thomas H. Cormen
Thomas H. Cormen[1] is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. In 2013, he published a new book titled Algorithms Unlocked. He is a professor of computer science at Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
and former Chair of the Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
Department of Computer Science. Between 2004 and 2008 he directed the Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
Writing Program.[2] His research interests are algorithm engineering, parallel computing, speeding up computations with high latency.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Honors and awards 3 Bibliography 4 Notes 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Thomas H. Cormen was born in New York City
New York City
in 1956
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Theoretical Computer Science (journal)
Theoretical Computer Science
Computer Science
(TCS) is a computer science journal published by Elsevier, started in 1975 and covering theoretical computer science. The journal publishes 52 issues a year. It is abstracted and indexed by Scopus and the Science Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports, its 2016 impact factor is 0.698.This article about a computer science journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals. Further suggestions might be found on the article's talk page.P ≟ NP  This theoretical computer science–related article is a stub
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Uri Zwick
Uri Zwick is an Israeli computer scientist and mathematician known for his work on graph algorithms, in particular on distances in graphs and on the color-coding technique for subgraph isomorphism.[1] With Howard Karloff, he is the namesake of the Karloff–Zwick algorithm for approximating the MAX-3SAT problem of Boolean satisfiability.[2] He and his coauthors won the David P
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Maximum Flow Problem
In optimization theory, maximum flow problems involve finding a feasible flow through a single-source, single-sink flow network that is maximum. The maximum flow problem can be seen as a special case of more complex network flow problems, such as the circulation problem
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