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Forbidden Zone
Matthew BrightNick James Nick L. MartinsonStory by Richard ElfmanStarringHervé Villechaize Susan Tyrrell Marie-Pascale Elfman Danny Elfman Gisele Lindley Jan Stuart Schwartz Virginia Rose Ugh-Fudge Bwana Phil Gordon Hyman Diamond Toshiro Boloney Viva Joe Spinell The Kipper KidsMusic by Danny ElfmanCinematography Gregory SandorEdited by Martin NicholsonDistributed by The Samuel Goldwyn CompanyRelease date1980[1]Running time76 minutesCountry United StatesLanguage EnglishBudget ~$100,000 Forbidden Zone is a 1982[1] American musical fantasy comedy film directed and produced by Richard Elfman, and co-written by Elfman and fellow Mystic Knights member Matthew Bright
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Castration
Castration
Castration
(also known as gonadectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which an individual loses use of the testicles. Surgical
Surgical
castration is bilateral orchiectomy (excision of both testes), and chemical castration uses pharmaceutical drugs to deactivate the testes. Castration
Castration
causes sterilization (preventing them from reproducing); it also greatly reduces the production of certain hormones, such as testosterone. Surgical
Surgical
castration in animals is often called neutering. The term "castration" is sometimes also used to refer to the removal of the ovaries in the female, otherwise known as an oophorectomy or, in animals, spaying
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Semi-trailer Truck
A semi-trailer truck (more commonly semi truck or simply "semi") is the combination of a tractor unit and one or more semi-trailers to carry freight. A semi-trailer attaches to the tractor with a fifth wheel hitch, with much of its weight borne by the tractor
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Sequel
A sequel is a literature, film, theatre, television, music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work.[1] In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear repeatedly
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Heroin
Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names,[1] is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects.[2] Medically it is used in several countries to relieve pain or in opioid replacement therapy.[7][8][9] Heroin
Heroin
is typically injected, usually into a vein; however, it can also be smoked, snorted or inhaled.[2][10][11] Onset of effects is usually rapid and lasts for a few hours.[2] Common side effects include respiratory depression (decreased breathing), dry mouth, euphoria, and addiction.[10] Other side effects can include abscesses, infected heart valves, blood born
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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La Brea Tar Pits
The La Brea Tar Pits
La Brea Tar Pits
are a group of tar pits around which Hancock Park was formed in urban Los Angeles. Natural asphalt (also called asphaltum, bitumen, pitch or tar—brea in Spanish) has seeped up from the ground in this area for tens of thousands of years. The tar is often covered with dust, leaves, or water. Over many centuries, the tar preserved the bones of trapped animals. The George C. Page Museum is dedicated to researching the tar pits and displaying specimens from the animals that died there. The La Brea Tar Pits
La Brea Tar Pits
are a registered National Natural Landmark. Since la brea means the tar in Spanish, "The La Brea Tar Pits" is an example of a tautological place name; "the La Brea Tar Pits" literally means "the the tar tar pits".[2]Contents1 Formation 2 History 3 Scientific resource3.1 Bacteria 3.2 George C
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Satan
Satan[a] is an entity in the Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
that seduces humans into sin. In Christianity
Christianity
and Islam, he is usually seen as a fallen angel, or a jinni, who used to possess great piety and beauty, but rebelled against God, who nevertheless allows him temporary power over the fallen world and a host of demons. A figure known as "the satan" first appears in the Tanakh
Tanakh
as a heavenly prosecutor, a member of the sons of God
God
subordinate to Yahweh, who prosecutes the nation of Judah in the heavenly court and tests the loyalty of Yahweh's followers by forcing them to suffer. During the intertestamental period, possibly due to influence from the Zoroastrian figure of Angra Mainyu, the satan developed into a malevolent entity with abhorrent qualities in dualistic opposition to God
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Beautiful Dreamer
"Beautiful Dreamer" is a parlor song by American songwriter Stephen Foster (1826–1864). It was published posthumously in March 1864, by Wm. A. Pond & Co. of New York. The first edition states on its title page that it is "the last song ever written by Stephen C. Foster. Composed but a few days prior to his death."[1] However, Carol Kimball, the author of Song, points out that the first edition's copyright is dated 1862, which suggests, she writes, the song was composed and readied for publication two years before Foster's death. There are at least 20 songs, she observes, that claim to be Foster's last, and it is unknown which is indeed his last. The song is set in 9 8 time with a broken chord accompaniment.[2][3] The song tells of a lover serenading a "Beautiful Dreamer" who is oblivious to worldly cares and may actually be dead
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Ska
Ska
Ska
(/skɑː/; Jamaican: [skjæ]) is a music genre that originated in Jamaica
Jamaica
in the late 1950s and was the precursor to rocksteady and reggae.[1] Ska
Ska
combined elements of Caribbean
Caribbean
mento and calypso with American jazz and rhythm and blues. It is characterized by a walking bass line accented with rhythms on the off-beat. Ska
Ska
developed in Jamaica
Jamaica
in the 1960s when Prince Buster, Clement "Coxsone" Dodd, and Duke Reid formed sound systems to play American rhythm and blues and then began recording their own songs.[2] Some suggest ska dates to earlier times, however. In the early 1960s, ska was the dominant music genre of Jamaica
Jamaica
and was popular with British mods
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16 Mm Film
16 mm film is a historically popular and economical gauge of film. 16 mm refers to the width of the film; other common film gauges include 8 and 35 mm. It is generally used for non-theatrical (e.g., industrial, educational) film-making, or for low-budget motion pictures. It also existed as a popular amateur or home movie-making format for several decades, alongside 8 mm film and later Super 8 film
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DVD
DVD
DVD
(an abbreviation of "digital video disc"[5] or "digital versatile disc"[6][7]) is a digital optical disc storage format invented and developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in 1995. The medium can store any kind of digital data and is widely used for software and other computer files as well as video programs watched using DVD
DVD
players. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than compact discs while having the same dimensions. Prerecorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are a form of DVD-ROM because data can only be read and not written or erased. Blank recordable DVD
DVD
discs ( DVD-R
DVD-R
and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM
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35 Mm Film
35 mm film (millimeter) is the film gauge most commonly used for motion pictures and chemical still photography (see 135 film). The name of the gauge refers to the width of the photographic film, which consists of strips 34.98 ±0.03 mm (1.377 ±0.001 inches) wide.[1][2][3][4][5][fn 1] The standard negative pulldown for movies ("single-frame" format) is four perforations per frame along both edges, which results in 16 frames per foot of film.[8] For still photography, the standard frame has eight perforations on each side. A variety of largely proprietary gauges were devised for the numerous camera and projection systems being developed independently in the late 19th century and early 20th century, ranging from 13 mm to 75 mm (0.51–2.95 in),[9] as well as a variety of film feeding systems. This resulted in cameras, projectors, and other equipment having to be calibrated to each gauge
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St. James Infirmary Blues
"St. James Infirmary Blues", is an American jazz song of uncertain origin. Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
made the song famous in his influential 1928 recording. On the original release of the Armstrong version, Don Redman was credited as composer; later releases gave the name of Joe Primrose, a pseudonym of Irving Mills[1]. The melody is 8 bars long, unlike songs in the classic blues genre, where there are 12 bars[2][better source needed]. It is in a minor key, and has a 4/4 time signature[3].Contents1 Authorship and history 2 Performers 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthorship and history[edit] "St
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Expressionism
Expressionism
Expressionism
was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.[1][2] Expressionist artists sought to express the meaning[3] of emotional experience rather than physical reality.[3][4] Expressionism
Expressionism
was developed as an avant-garde style before the First World War. It remained popular during the Weimar Republic,[1] particularly in Berlin. The style extended to a wide range of the arts, including expressionist architecture, painting, literature, theatre, dance, film and music. The term is sometimes suggestive of angst
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Hand-colouring
Hand-colouring (or hand-coloring) refers to any method of manually adding colour to a black-and-white photograph, generally either to heighten the realism of the photograph or for artistic purposes.[1] Hand-colouring is also known as hand painting or overpainting. Typically, watercolours, oils, crayons or pastels, and other paints or dyes are applied to the image surface using brushes, fingers, cotton swabs or airbrushes
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.