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Foden Trucks
A truck or lorry is a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Trucks vary greatly in size, power, and configuration; smaller varieties may be mechanically similar to some automobiles. Commercial trucks can be very large and powerful, and may be configured to mount specialized equipment, such as in the case of fire trucks and concrete mixers and suction excavators. Modern trucks are largely powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gasoline engines exist in the US, Canada, and Mexico
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Pakistani English
Pakistani English
Pakistani English
or Paklish is the group of English language varieties spoken and written in Pakistan.[1] It was first so recognised and designated in the 1970s and 1980s.[2] Pakistani English (PE) is slightly different in respect to vocabulary, syntax, accent, spellings of some words and other features. 27% of the Pakistani population can speak English as a first language
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Starter Motor
A starter (also self starter, self, cranking motor, or starter motor) is a device used to rotate (crank) an internal-combustion engine so as to initiate the engine's operation under its own power. Starters can be electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic. In the case of very large engines, the starter can even be another internal-combustion engine. Internal-combustion engines are feedback systems, which, once started, rely on the inertia from each cycle to initiate the next cycle. In a four-stroke engine, the third stroke releases energy from the fuel, powering the fourth (exhaust) stroke and also the first two (intake, compression) strokes of the next cycle, as well as powering the engine's external load. To start the first cycle at the beginning of any particular session, the first two strokes must be powered in some other way than from the engine itself
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Brake
A brake is a mechanical device that inhibits motion by absorbing energy from a moving system.[1] It is used for slowing or stopping a moving vehicle, wheel, axle, or to prevent its motion, most often accomplished by means of friction.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Types2.1 Frictional 2.2 Pumping 2.3 Electromagnetic3 Characteristics3.1 Foundation components 3.2 Brake
Brake
boost4 Noise 5 Fires 6 Inefficiency 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Most brakes commonly use friction between two surfaces pressed together to convert the kinetic energy of the moving object into heat, though other methods of energy conversion may be employed
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Cabin (truck)
The cabin or cab of a truck is an enclosed space in a truck where the driver is seated. Modern long-haul trucks′ cabs usually feature air conditioning, heater, a good sound system, and ergonomic seats (often air-suspended). A sleeper (or sleeper berth or bunk) is a compartment attached to the cab where the driver can rest while not driving, sometimes seen in semi-trailer trucks. They can range from a simple 2 to 4 foot (0.6 to 1.2 m) bunk to a 12 foot (3.7 m) apartment-on-wheels. There are a few possible cab configurations: Cab over
Cab over
engine (COE) or flat nose, where the driver is seated on top of the front axle and the engine. The front doors are typically in front of and above the front tires. This design is almost ubiquitous in Europe, where overall truck lengths are strictly regulated
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Semi-trailer Truck
A semi-trailer truck (more commonly semi truck or simply "semi") is the combination of a tractor unit and one or more semi-trailers to carry freight. A semi-trailer attaches to the tractor with a fifth wheel hitch, with much of its weight borne by the tractor
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Ford Motor Company
Coordinates: 42°18′53″N 83°12′38″W / 42.31472°N 83.21056°W / 42.31472; -83.21056Ford Motor CompanyGo FurtherThe Ford World Headquarters
Ford World Headquarters
in Dearborn, Michigan, also known as the Glass HouseTypePublicTraded asNYSE: F S&P 100 Component S&P 500 ComponentIndustry AutomotiveFounded June 16, 1903; 114 years ago (1903-06-16)Founder Henry FordHeadquarters Dearborn, Michigan, U.S.Area servedWorldwideKey peopleWilliam C
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Canadian English
Canadian English
Canadian English
(CanE, CE, en-CA[3]) is the set of varieties of the English language
English language
native to Canada
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Australian English
Australian English
Australian English
(AuE, en-AU)[3] is a major variety of the English language, used throughout Australia. Although English has no official status in the Constitution, Australian English
Australian English
is the country's national and de facto official language as it is the first language of the majority of the population. Australian English
Australian English
began to diverge from British English
British English
after the founding of the Colony of New South Wales
Colony of New South Wales
in 1788 and was recognised as being different from British English
British English
by 1820
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New Zealand English
New Zealand
New Zealand
English (NZE) is the variant[2] of the English language spoken by most English-speaking New Zealanders. Its language code in ISO and Internet standards is en-NZ.[3] English is one of New Zealand's three official languages (along with New Zealand
New Zealand
Sign Language and the Māori language)[4] and is the first language of the majority of the population. The English language
English language
was established in New Zealand
New Zealand
by colonists during the 19th century
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Puerto Rico
Coordinates: 18°12′N 66°30′W / 18.2°N 66.5°W / 18.2; -66.5Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Joannes est nomen ejus" (Latin) "John is his name"Anthem: "La Borinqueña"[a] "The Borinquenian""The Star-Spangled Banner"Great SealStatus Unincorporated territoryCapital and largest city San Juan 18°27′N 66°6′W / 18.450°N 66.100°W / 18.450; -66.100Official languages Spanish English[1]Common languages94.7% Spanish[2]5.3% EnglishEthnic groups75.8% White12.4% Black3.3% Two or more races0.5% American Indian & Alaskan Native0.2% Asian<0.1% Pacific Islander7.8% Other[3]DemonymPuerto Rican (formal) American (since 1917) Boricua (colloquial)Country  United StatesGovernment Commonwealth[b
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South African English
South African English
South African English
(SAfrE, SAfrEng, SAE, en-ZA[1]) is the set of English dialects spoken by native South Africans.Contents1 History 2 Varieties 3 Phonetics 4 Lexicon4.1 History of SAE Dictionaries 4.2 Expressions5 Demographics 6 Examples of South African accents 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] British colonizers first introduced English to the South African region in 1795, when they established a military holding operation at the Cape
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Straight Engine
The straight or inline engine is an internal-combustion engine with all cylinders aligned in one row and having no offset. Usually found in four, six and eight cylinder configurations, they have been used in automobiles, locomotives and aircraft, although the term in-line has a broader meaning when applied to aircraft engines, see Inline engine (aviation).[citation needed] A straight engine is considerably easier to build than an otherwise equivalent horizontally opposed or V engine, because both the cylinder bank and crankshaft can be milled from a single metal casting, and it requires fewer cylinder heads and camshafts. In-line engines are also smaller in overall physical dimensions than designs such as the radial, and can be mounted in any direction. Straight configurations are simpler than their V-shaped counterparts
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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