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Foal
A foal is an equine up to one year old; this term is used mainly for horses. More specific terms are colt for a male foal and filly for a female foal, and are used until the horse is three or four. When the foal is nursing from its dam (mother), it may also be called a "suckling". After it has been weaned from its dam, it may be called a "weanling". When a mare is pregnant, she is said to be "in foal". When the mare gives birth, she is "foaling", and the impending birth is usually stated as "to foal". A newborn horse is "foaled". After a horse is one year old, it is no longer a foal, and is a "yearling". There are no special age-related terms for young horses older than yearlings. When young horses reach breeding maturity, the terms change: a filly over three (four in horse racing) is called a mare, and a colt over three is called a stallion
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Colostrum
Colostrum
Colostrum
(known colloquially as beestings,[1] bisnings[2] or first milk) is a form of milk produced by the mammary glands of mammals (including many humans) during pregnancy. Most species will generate colostrum just prior to giving birth. Colostrum
Colostrum
contains antibodies to protect the newborn against disease. In general, protein concentration in colostrum is substantially higher than in milk. Fat concentration is substantially higher in colostrum than in milk in some species, e.g. sheep[3][4][5] and horses,[6][7] but lower in colostrum than in milk in some other species, e.g
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Horse Blanket
A horse blanket or rug is a blanket or animal coat intended for keeping a horse or other equine warm or otherwise protected from wind or other elements. They are tailored to fit around a horse's body from chest to rump, with straps crossing underneath the belly to secure the blanket yet allowing the horse to move about freely. Most have one or two straps that buckle in front, but a few designs have a closed front and must be slipped over a horse's head. Some designs also have small straps that loop lightly around the horse's hind legs to prevent the blanket from slipping sideways.[1]Contents1 Protection from the elements 2 Saddle blankets 3 Other designs 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksProtection from the elements[edit] Standard horse blankets are commonly kept on a horse when it is loose in a stall or pasture as well as when traveling. Different weights are made for different weather conditions, and some are water-resistant or waterproof
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Water
Water
Water
is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that each of its molecules contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Strictly speaking, water refers to the liquid state of a substance that prevails at standard ambient temperature and pressure; but it often refers also to its solid state (ice) or its gaseous state (steam or water vapor). It also occurs in nature as snow, glaciers, ice packs and icebergs, clouds, fog, dew, aquifers, and atmospheric humidity. Water
Water
covers 71% of the Earth's surface.[1] It is vital for all known forms of life
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Growth Disorders
Growth hormone therapy refers to the use of growth hormone (GH) as a prescription medication—it is one form of hormone therapy. Growth hormone is a peptide hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that stimulates growth and cell reproduction. In the past, growth hormone was extracted from human pituitary glands. Growth hormone is now produced by recombinant DNA technology and is prescribed for a variety of reasons. GH therapy has been a focus of social and ethical controversies for 50 years. This article describes the history of GH treatment and the current uses and risks arising from GH use
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Pregnancy
Pregnancy, also known as gestation, is the time during which one or more offspring develops inside a woman.[4] A multiple pregnancy involves more than one offspring, such as with twins.[12] Pregnancy can occur by sexual intercourse or assisted reproductive technology.[6] Childbirth
Childbirth
typically occurs around 40 weeks from the last menstrual period (LMP).[4][5] This is just over nine months, where each month averages 29½ days.[4][5] When measured from conception it is about 38 weeks.[5] An embryo is the developing offspring during the first eight weeks following conception, after which, the term fetus is used until birt
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Domestication
Domestication
Domestication
is a sustained multi-generational relationship in which one group of organisms assumes a significant degree of influence over the reproduction and care of another group to secure a more predictable supply of resources from that second group.[1] Charles Darwin recognized the small number of traits that made domestic species different from their wild ancestors. He was also the first to recognize the difference between conscious selective breeding in which humans directly select for desirable traits, and unconscious selection where traits evolve as a by-product of natural selection or from selection on other traits.[2][3][4] There is a genetic difference between domestic and wild populations
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Northern Hemisphere
Coordinates: 90°0′0″N 0°0′0″E / 90.00000°N 0.00000°E / 90.00000; 0.00000 Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
shaded blue. The hemispheres appear to be unequal in this image due to Antarctica
Antarctica
not being shown, but in reality are the same size. Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
from above the North
North
PoleThe Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
is the half of Earth
Earth
that is north of the Equator
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Puberty
Puberty
Puberty
is the process of physical changes through which a child's body matures into an adult body capable of sexual reproduction. It is initiated by hormonal signals from the brain to the gonads: the ovaries in a girl, the testes in a boy. In response to the signals, the gonads produce hormones that stimulate libido and the growth, function, and transformation of the brain, bones, muscle, blood, skin, hair, breasts, and sex organs. Physical growth—height and weight—accelerates in the first half of puberty and is completed when an adult body has been developed
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Equestrianism
Equestrianism
Equestrianism
(from Latin
Latin
equester, equestr-, equus, horseman, horse),[1] more often known as riding, horse riding (British English) or horseback riding (American English),[2] refers to the skill of riding, driving, steeplechasing or vaulting with horses
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Horse Gait
Horse
Horse
gaits are the various ways in which a horse can move, either naturally or as a result of specialized training by humans.[1]Contents1 Classification 2 Walk 3 Trot 4 Canter and gallop4.1 Canter 4.2 Gallop5 Pace 6 "Ambling" gaits 7 References 8 External linksClassification[edit] Gaits are typically categorized into two groups: the "natural" gaits that most horses will use without special training, and the "ambling" gaits that are various smooth-riding four-beat footfall patterns that may appear naturally in some individuals, but which usually occur only in certain breeds
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Driving (horse)
Driving, when applied to horses, ponies, mules, or donkeys, is a broad term for hitching equines to a wagon, carriage, cart, sleigh, or other horse-drawn vehicle by means of a harness and working them in this way. It encompasses a wide range of activities from pleasure driving, to harness racing, to farm work, horse shows, and even International combined driving competition sanctioned by the FEI. The term in harness often is used to describe a horse being driven.Contents1 Styles 2 Teams 3 History 4 See also 5 ReferencesStyles[edit] For horse training purposes, "driving" may also include the practice of long-lining (long reining), wherein a horse is driven without a cart by a handler walking behind or behind and to the side of the animal. This technique is used in the early stages of training horses for riding as well as for driving. Horses, mules and donkeys are driven in harness in many different ways
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Halter
A halter (US) or headcollar (UK) is headgear that is used to lead or tie up livestock and, occasionally, other animals; it fits behind the ears (behind the poll), and around the muzzle. To handle the animal, usually a lead rope or lead shank is attached. On smaller animals, such as dogs, a leash is attached to the halter.Contents1 History 2 Uses 3 Construction 4 Horse
Horse
halters 5 Leading 6 Safety and security issues 7 See also 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksHistory[edit] Horse
Horse
wearing a nylon web halter (US) or headcollar.A show halter on a Murray Grey bullHalters may be as old as the early domestication of animals, and their history is not as well studied as that of the bridle or hackamore
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Horse Grooming
Horse
Horse
grooming is hygienic care given to a horse, or a process by which the horse's physical appearance is enhanced for horse shows or other types of competition.Contents1 Reasons for grooming 2 Tools used for grooming 3 The hoof3.1 Cleaning the feet 3.2 Dressings and polish4 Bathing 5 Clipping5.1 Trimming 5.2 Body clipping6 The mane 7 The tail 8 Other show grooming products and supplies8.1 Highlighter 8.2 Neck sweats 8.3 Coat treatments9 See also 10 ReferencesReasons for grooming[edit] Grooming is an important part of horse care
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Farrier
A farrier is a specialist in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of horses' hooves and the placing of shoes on their hooves, if necessary. A farrier combines some blacksmith's skills (fabricating, adapting, and adjusting metal shoes) with some veterinarian's skills (knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb) to care for horses' feet.Contents1 History and ceremonial 2 Work2.1 Tools used3 Qualifications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory and ceremonial[edit] Historically, the jobs of farrier and blacksmith were practically synonymous, shown by the etymology of the word: farrier comes from Middle French: ferrier (blacksmith), from the Latin
Latin
word ferrum (iron).[1] A farrier's work in colonial America or pre-Industrial Revolution Europe would have included shoeing horses, as well as the fabrication and repair of tools, the forging of architectural pieces, and so on
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