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Flushing Meadows–Corona Park
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, often referred to as Flushing Meadows Park, or simply Flushing Meadows, is a public park in New York City. Located in the borough of Queens, it is between I-678 (Van Wyck Expressway) and the Grand Central Parkway
Grand Central Parkway
and stretches from Flushing Bay, at the southern edge of LaGuardia Airport, to Union Turnpike. It contains the USTA Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
National Tennis Center, the current venue for the US Open tennis tournament; Citi Field, the home of the New York Mets
New York Mets
baseball team; the New York Hall of Science; the Queens Museum of Art; the Queens
Queens
Theatre in the Park; the Queens
Queens
Zoo; and the New York State Pavilion
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Flushing Meadows (film)
Flushing Meadows (1965) is an American short film by Larry Jordan, with director Joseph Cornell. The film is 8 minutes long, in color, 16mm, and silent. The film is an ode to the memory of Joyce Hunter, a Queens waitress Cornell met in 1962. Cornell apparently had an infatuation with Hunter even though she was found to have stolen items and attempted to fence them. Cornell never pressed charges against Hunter and she was murdered in December 1964. The film was produced after Hunter's death and is largely a series of scenes from Flushing Cemetery where Hunter was buried.[1] The film was first shown publicly at the Gramercy Theatre in New York City on December 22, 2003. The short aired twice at the 2004 Toronto International Film Festival, in commemoration of the centennial of Cornell's birth. See also[edit]List of American films of 1965References[edit]^ New York Times (December 21, 2003)This article about a short silent film is a stub
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Vlissingen
Vlissingen
Vlissingen
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈvlɪsɪŋə(n)] ( listen); Zeelandic: Vlissienge; historical name in English: Flushing) is a municipality and a city in the southwestern Netherlands
Netherlands
on the former island of Walcheren. With its strategic location between the Scheldt
Scheldt
river and the North Sea, Vlissingen
Vlissingen
has been an important harbour for centuries. It was granted city rights in 1315. In the 17th century Vlissingen
Vlissingen
was a main harbour for ships of the Dutch East India Company
Dutch East India Company
(VOC)
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
The Netherlands
(/ˈnɛðərləndz/ ( listen); Dutch: Nederland [ˈneːdərˌlɑnt] ( listen)), also known informally as Holland, is a country in Western Europe
Europe
with a population of seventeen million
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Glacial Period
A glacial period (alternatively glacial or glaciation) is an interval of time (thousands of years) within an ice age that is marked by colder temperatures and glacier advances. Interglacials, on the other hand, are periods of warmer climate between glacial periods. The last glacial period ended about 15,000 years ago.[1] The Holocene
Holocene
epoch is the current interglacial. A time when there are no glaciers on Earth is considered a greenhouse climate state.[2][3][4]Look up glaciation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 Quaternary ice age 2 Last glacial period 3 Next glacial period 4 See also 5 ReferencesQuaternary ice age[edit] Main articles: Quaternary glaciation
Quaternary glaciation
and timeline of glaciationGlacial and interglacial cycles as represented by atmospheric CO2, measured from ice core samples going back 800,000 years. The stage names are part of the North American and the European Alpine subdivisions
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Wisconsin Glaciation
The Wisconsin Glacial Episode, also called the Wisconsinan glaciation, was the most recent glacial period of the North American ice sheet complex. This advance included the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, which nucleated in the northern North American Cordillera; the Innuitian ice sheet, which extended across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago; the Greenland ice sheet; and the massive Laurentide ice sheet,[1] which covered the high latitudes of central and eastern North America. This advance was synchronous with global glaciation during the last glacial period, including the North American alpine glacier advance, known as the Pinedale glaciation. The Wisconsin glaciation
Wisconsin glaciation
extended from approximately 75,000 to 11,000 years ago, between the Sangamon interglacial (known globally as the Eemian
Eemian
stage) and the current interglacial, the Holocene
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Moraine
A moraine is any glacially formed accumulation of unconsolidated glacial debris (regolith and rock) that occurs in both currently and formerly glaciated regions on Earth (i.e. a past glacial maximum), through geomorphological processes. Moraines are formed from debris previously carried along by a glacier and normally consist of somewhat rounded particles ranging in size from large boulders to minute glacial flour. Lateral moraines are formed at the side of the ice flow and terminal moraines at the foot, marking the maximum advance of the glacier
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Estuaries
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
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Long Island
Coordinates: 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Long IslandNative name: Paumanok[1]Location of Long Island
Long Island
in New YorkGeographyLocation Atlantic OceanCoordinates 40°48′N 73°18′W / 40.8°N 73.3°W / 40.8; -73.3Area 1,401 sq mi (3,630 km2)AdministrationUnited StatesState New YorkDemographicsDemonym Long IslanderPopulation 7,869,820 (2017)Pop
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Terminal Moraine
A terminal moraine, also called end moraine, is a type of moraine that forms at the snout (edge) of a glacier, marking its maximum advance. At this point, debris that has accumulated by plucking and abrasion, and has been pushed by the front edge of the ice, is driven no further and instead is dumped in a heap. Because the glacier acts very much like a conveyor belt, the longer it stays in one place, the greater the amount of material that will be deposited. The moraine is left as the marking point of the terminal extent of the ice.[1] Examples[edit] Terminal moraines are one of the most prominent types of moraines in the Arctic
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Drainage Divide
A drainage divide, water divide, divide, ridgeline,[1] watershed, or water parting is the line that separates neighbouring drainage basins. On rugged land, the divide lies along topographical ridges, and may be in the form of a single range of hills or mountains, known as a dividing range
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New York Mets
The New York Mets
New York Mets
are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City
New York City
borough of Queens. The Mets compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the National League
National League
(NL) East division. The Mets are one of two Major League clubs based in New York City; the other is the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
of the American League. One of baseball's first expansion teams, the Mets were founded in 1962 to replace New York's departed NL teams, the Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
and the New York Giants. The Mets' colors are composed of the Dodgers' blue and the Giants' orange, which also form the outer two bands of the New York City flag.[4] During the 1962 and 1963 seasons, the Mets played their home games at the Polo Grounds
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Waterfowl
Anseriformes
Anseriformes
is an order of birds that comprise about 180 living species in three families: Anhimidae
Anhimidae
(the screamers), Anseranatidae (the magpie goose), and Anatidae, the largest family, which includes over 170 species of waterfowl, among them the ducks, geese, and swans. In fact, these living species are all included in the Anatidae
Anatidae
except for the three screamers and the magpie goose. All species in the order are highly adapted for an aquatic existence at the water surface. The males, except for the screamers, also have a penis, a trait that has been lost in the Neoaves
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US Open (tennis)
Open
Open
or OPEN may refer to: Recorded music[edit] Open
Open
(band), Australian pop/rock band The Open
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Fiddler Crab
ca. 100; see textA fiddler crab, sometimes known as a calling crab, may be any of approximately 100 species of semi-terrestrial marine crabs which make up the genus Uca.[1] As members of the family Ocypodidae, fiddler crabs are most closely related to the ghost crabs of the genus Ocypode. This entire group is composed of small crabs – the largest being slightly over two inches across. Fiddler crabs are found along sea beaches and brackish inter-tidal mud flats, lagoons and swamps. Fiddler crabs are most well known for their sexually dimorphic claws; the males’ major claw is much larger than the minor claw while the females’ claws are both the same size.[2] Like all crabs, fiddler crabs shed their shells as they grow. If they have lost legs or claws during their present growth cycle, a new one will be present when they molt
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