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Flumpet
BrassWind Brass AerophoneInventor(s) Art Farmer, David MonetteDeveloped David MonettePlaying rangeWritten range:Related instrumentsTrumpet, flugelhorn, cornetMusiciansArt Farmer, Mark Isham, Charles SchlueterThe Flumpet
Flumpet
is a hybrid brass horn instrument that shares the construction and timbre qualities of a trumpet and flugelhorn. The Flumpet
Flumpet
was invented for Art Farmer
Art Farmer
by David Monette[1] and is currently in production by Monette.[2][3] The Flumpet
Flumpet
has a pitch of B♭ (B flat).[4]Contents1 Design 2 Notable flumpet players 3 Popular Culture 4 References 5 External linksDesign[edit] The Flumpet
Flumpet
was designed in 1989[2] and borrows the three piston valve design of both the trumpet and flugelhorn and shares the same instrument length of a trumpet
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Brass Instrument
A brass instrument is a musical instrument that produces sound by sympathetic vibration of air in a tubular resonator in sympathy with the vibration of the player's lips. Brass
Brass
instruments are also called labrosones, literally meaning "lip-vibrated instruments".[1] There are several factors involved in producing different pitches on a brass instrument. Slides, valves, crooks (though they are rarely used today), or keys are used to change vibratory length of tubing, thus changing the available harmonic series, while the player's embouchure, lip tension and air flow serve to select the specific harmonic produced from the available series. The view of most scholars (see organology) is that the term "brass instrument" should be defined by the way the sound is made, as above, and not by whether the instrument is actually made of brass
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Musical Instrument Classification
Throughout history, various methods of musical instrument classification have been used. The most commonly used system divides instruments into string instruments, woodwind instruments, brass instruments and percussion instruments; however, other schemes have been devised.Contents1 Chinese classification 2 Western classification 3 Mahillon and Hornbostel-Sachs systems 4 André Schaeffner4.1 Elementary organology5 Range 6 Other classifications6.1 Indonesian instruments 6.2 West African instruments 6.3 Kurt Reinhard 6.4 Persia7 See also 8 ReferencesChinese classification[edit] The oldest known scheme of classifying instruments is Chinese and dates from the 3rd millennium BC.[citation needed] It grouped instruments according to the materials they are made of
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Afterglow (1997 Film)
Afterglow is a 1997 feature film starring Nick Nolte, Julie Christie, Lara Flynn Boyle
Lara Flynn Boyle
and Jonny Lee Miller. Alan Rudolph
Alan Rudolph
directed and wrote the script for the film. It was produced by Robert Altman
Robert Altman
and filmed in Montreal. Christie's performance earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role[1] The film is about two married couples who end up attracted to each other's partners. The title, Afterglow, refers to a woman's glow during pregnancy and the second chapter of a person's life.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Critical reception3.1 Awards4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] The lives of two unhappily married couples intertwine in Montreal, Canada. The marriage between Lucky Mann, a contractor and his beautiful British wife, former actress Phyllis Hart, has been in a poor state for years
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Trumpet Concerto (Haydn)
Joseph Haydn's Concerto
Concerto
per il Clarino (Hob.: VIIe/1) (Trumpet Concerto
Concerto
in E flat major) was written in 1796 for his long-time friend Anton Weidinger. Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
was 64 years of age. A favorite of the trumpet repertoire, it has been cited as "possibly Haydn's most popular concerto".[1]Contents1 Original instrument 2 Form 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOriginal instrument[edit] Anton Weidinger developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering the vibration of the lips; also called by the name of natural trumpet
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Haydn
(Franz) Joseph Haydn[n 1] (/ˈhaɪdən/; German: [ˈjoːzɛf ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 31 March[n 2] 1732 – 31 May 1809) was an Austrian composer of the Classical period. He was instrumental in the development of chamber music such as the piano trio[2] and his contributions to musical form have earned him the epithets "Father of the Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet".[3] Haydn spent much of his career as a court musician for the wealthy Esterházy
Esterházy
family at their remote estate
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Symphony No. 3 (Mahler)
The Symphony
Symphony
No. 3 by Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
was written in 1896,[1] or possibly only completed in that year, but composed between 1893 and 1896.[2] It is his longest piece and is the longest symphony in the standard repertoire, with a typical performance lasting around 90 to 105 minutes. It was voted the tenth-greatest symphony of all time in a survey of conductors carried out by the BBC
BBC
Music Magazine.[3]Contents1 Structure 2 Instrumentation 3 Text3.1 Fourth movement 3.2 Fifth movement4 Tonality 5 Performance 6 Premieres 7 Media 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksStructure[edit] In its final form, the work has six movements, grouped into two Parts:Kräftig
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Mahler
Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
(German: [ˈmaːlɐ]; 7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was an Austro-Bohemian late-Romantic composer, and one of the leading conductors of his generation. As a composer he acted as a bridge between the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 his compositions were rediscovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became one of the most frequently performed and recorded of all composers, a position he has sustained into the 21st century
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Post-horn
The post horn (also post-horn) is a valveless cylindrical brass instrument with a cupped mouthpiece. The instrument was used to signal the arrival or departure of a post rider or mail coach. It was used especially by postilions of the 18th and 19th centuries.Contents1 Use and construction 2 Compositions with/for the post horn2.1 Beer's Concerto 2.2 Mozart's Posthorn Serenade 2.3 Mahler and others 2.4 Post Horn Gallop 2.5 Compositions for other instruments imitating a post horn3 Other uses 4 The post horn as graphical symbol4.1 List of postal services that include the post horn in their logos 4.2 Examples of post horns as graphics5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksUse and construction[edit] The post horn is sometimes confused with the coach horn, and even though the two types of horn served the same principal purpose, they differ in their physical appearance
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Boston Symphony Orchestra
The Boston
Boston
Symphony Orchestra
Orchestra
(BSO) is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts. It is one of the five major American symphony orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five".[1] Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at Tanglewood. Andris Nelsons
Andris Nelsons
is the current music director of the BSO
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The Art Farmer Septet
The Art Farmer Septet is the debut album by trumpeter Art Farmer, featuring performances recorded in 1953 and 1954, arranged by Quincy Jones and Gigi Gryce, and released by Prestige Records.[1] The cover art was done by cartoonist Don Martin. The recordings made on July 2, 1953 are some of the earliest recordings of the electric bass
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Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Learson Marsalis (born October 18, 1961) is a trumpeter, composer, teacher, music educator, and artistic director of Jazz
Jazz
at Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center
in New York City, United States. Marsalis has promoted the appreciation of classical and jazz music often to young audiences. Marsalis has been awarded nine Grammys in both genres, and his Blood on the Fields was the first jazz composition to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Marsalis is the son of jazz musician Ellis Marsalis, Jr. (pianist), grandson of Ellis Marsalis, Sr., and brother of Branford (saxophonist), Delfeayo (trombonist), and Jason (drummer)
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Trombone Shorty
Troy Andrews (born January 2, 1986), also known by the stage name Trombone Shorty, is an American musician, producer, actor and philanthropist from New Orleans, Louisiana. He is best known as a trombone and trumpet player but also plays drums, organ, and tuba. He has worked with some of the biggest names in rock, pop, jazz, funk, and hip hop. Andrews is the younger brother of trumpeter and bandleader James Andrews and the grandson of singer and songwriter Jessie Hill. Other musical family members are cousins Glen David Andrews and the late Travis "Trumpet Black" Hill
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Scotty Barnhart
William "Scotty" Barnhart (born October 27, 1964)[1] is an American jazz trumpeter. A two-time Grammy winner, he has played since 1993 as a featured soloist with Count Basie Orchestra.[1] In September 2013, Barnhart was announced as the new director of the Basie Orchestra.[2] He has multiple recordings with pianist Marcus Roberts, as well as recordings with Tony Bennett, Diana Krall, Ray Charles, and Tito Puente. A solo CD, released with Unity Music, is titled Say It Plain and features Clark Terry, Ellis and Wynton Marsalis, Marcus Roberts, Jamie Davis and Etienne Charles; it achieved number 3 in the Jazz Charts. Also active as an educator and clinician, he is author of The World of Jazz Trumpet - A Comprehensive History and Practical Philosophy (published by Hal Leonard)
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