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Flos Duellatorum
The Flos Duellatorum
Flos Duellatorum
is the name given to one of the manuscript versions of Fiore dei Liberi's illuminated manuscript fight book, written in 1410 (dated to 1409 in the old reckoning). There are two other surviving recensions, under the title Fior di Battaglia. Both Flos Duellatorum
Flos Duellatorum
and Fior di Battaglia translate into English roughly as "The Flower of Battle," from Latin
Latin
and Italian respectively.Contents1 Manuscripts 2 Contents2.1 Sette spade3 See also 4 External links 5 Further readingManuscripts[edit] The manuscript dated to 1409 was considered lost, and is now known to be kept in a private collection. It is referred to as the Pisani-Dossi manuscript for the last collection it was a part of before its disappearance. The information contained within survives in the form of a 1902 facsimile by the Italian historian Francesco Novati
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Prudence
Prudence
Prudence
(Latin: prudentia, contracted from providentia meaning "seeing ahead, sagacity") is the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of reason.[1] It is classically considered to be a virtue, and in particular one of the four Cardinal virtues
Cardinal virtues
(which are, with the three theological virtues, part of the seven virtues). Prudentia
Prudentia
is an allegorical female personification of the virtue, whose attributes are a mirror and snake, who is frequently depicted as a pair with Justitia, the Roman goddess of Justice. The word derives from the 14th-century Old French
Old French
word prudence, which, in turn, derives from the Latin prudentia meaning "foresight, sagacity"
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Bastoncello
Story Teller (sold as Story Time in Australia and New Zealand) was a magazine partwork published by Marshall Cavendish between 1982 and 1985.Contents1 Publishing history1.1 The original collection 1.2 Storyteller 2 1.3 Little Story Teller 1.4 Christmas specials 1.5 Story Teller Song Book 1.6 My Big Book of Fairy Tales 1.7 Availability2 Stories and readers2.1 Story Teller 1 2.2 Story Teller 2 2.3 Christmas Story Teller3 In other languages 4 Similar partworks4.1 Disney's Storytime5 References 6 External linksPublishing history[edit] The original collection[edit] The original Story Teller was released from December 1982 and throughout 1983 as a fortnightly partwork. Each magazine contained a selection of children's stories, some traditional folk tales like "Anansi the Spiderman", some classic children's tales such as Gobbolino, the Witch's Cat, and some contemporary works written especially for the series, like "Timbertwig". Most issues contained a poem or two, as well
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Sword
A sword is a bladed weapon intended for slashing or thrusting that is longer than a knife or dagger. The precise definition of the term varies with the historical epoch or the geographical region under consideration. A sword consists of a long blade attached to a hilt. The blade can be straight or curved. Thrusting swords have a pointed tip on the blade, and tend to be straighter; slashing swords have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade, and are more likely to be curved. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze
Bronze
Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard
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Spear
A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood, with a pointed head. The head may be simply the sharpened end of the shaft itself, as is the case with fire hardened spears, or it may be made of a more durable material fastened to the shaft, such as flint, obsidian, iron, steel or bronze. The most common design for hunting or combat spears since ancient times has incorporated a metal spearhead shaped like a triangle, lozenge, or leaf. The heads of fishing spears usually feature barbs or serrated edges. The word spear comes from the Old English spere, from the Proto-Germanic speri, from a Proto-Indo-European root *sper- "spear, pole". Spears can be divided into two broad categories: those designed for thrusting in melee combat and those designed for throwing (usually referred to as javelins). The spear has been used throughout human history both as a hunting and fishing tool and as a weapon
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Quarterstaff
A quarterstaff (plural quarterstaffs or quarterstaves), also short staff or simply staff is a traditional European pole weapon, which was especially prominent in England
England
during the Early Modern period. The term is generally accepted to refer to a shaft of hardwood from 6 to 9 feet (1.8 to 2.7 m) long, sometimes with a metal tip, ferrule, or spike at one or both ends. The term "short staff" compares this to the "long staff" based on the pike with a length in excess of 11 to 12 feet (3.4 to 3.7 m).Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Historical practice 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit]Look up quarterstaff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.The name "quarterstaff" is first attested in the mid-16th century
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Armour
Armour
Armour
( British English
British English
or Canadian English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted to an object, individual or vehicle by direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from damage caused by a potentially dangerous environment or action (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.). Personal armour
Personal armour
is used to protect soldiers and war animals. Vehicle armour is used on warships and armoured fighting vehicles. A second use of the term armour describes armoured forces, armoured weapons, and their role in combat
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Halfsword
Half-sword, in 14th- to 16th-century fencing with longswords, refers to the technique of gripping the central part of the sword blade with the left hand in order to execute more forceful thrusts against armoured and unarmoured opponents. The term is a translation of the original German Halbschwert. Equivalently, the techniques were referred to as mit dem kurzen Schwert "with the shortened sword."Page of the Codex Wallerstein showing a half-sword thrust against a Mordhau
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Poleaxe
The pollaxe is a type of European polearm. It was widely used by medieval infantry. It is also known by the names poleaxe, pole-axe, pole axe, polax, and Hache (French meaning axe). The term has become synonymous with felling or striking down with delivery of a blow.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of pollaxe 3 Fighting with pollaxe 4 Popular usage 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Weapons such as the halberd, bardiche, and Danish axe are sometimes mistakenly called pollaxes as they are indeed axes mounted on poles, but many etymological authorities consider the poll- prefix historically unrelated to "pole", instead meaning "head".[1][2] However, some etymologists, including Eric Partridge, believe that the word is derived from "pole".[3] Types of pollaxe[edit]Godfrey of Bouillon holds a short Lucerne hammer
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Club (weapon)
A club (also known as a cudgel, baton, truncheon, cosh, nightstick, or bludgeon) is among the simplest of all weapons: a short staff or stick, usually made of wood, wielded as a weapon[1] since prehistoric times. There are several examples of blunt-force trauma caused by clubs in the past, including at the site of Nataruk
Nataruk
in Turkana, Kenya, described as the scene of a prehistoric conflict between bands of hunter-gatherers 10,000 years ago.[2] In popular culture, clubs are associated with primitive cultures, especially cavemen. Most clubs are small enough to be swung with one hand, although larger clubs may require the use of two to be effective. Various specialized clubs are used in martial arts and other fields, including the law-enforcement baton
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Lynx
A lynx (/lɪŋks/;[2] plural lynx or lynxes[3]) is any of the four species within the Lynx
Lynx
genus of medium-sized wild cats, which includes the bobcat
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Cudgel
Singlestick, also known as cudgels, refers to both a martial art that uses a wooden stick as well as the weapon used in the art. It began as a way of training sailors in the use of swords such as the saber or the cutlass.[citation needed] Canne de combat, a French form of stick fighting, is similar to singlestick play, which also includes a self-defense variant with a walking stick.Contents1 Weapon 2 History and technique 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksWeapon[edit] The singlestick itself is a slender, round wooden rod, traditionally of ash, with a basket hilt. Singlesticks are typically around 36 inches (91 cm) in length and 1 inch (2.5 cm) in diameter and thicker at one end than the other
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Codex Wallerstein
The so-called Codex Wallerstein
Codex Wallerstein
or Vonn Baumanns Fechtbuch (Oettingen-Wallerstein Cod. I.6.4o.2, Augsburg University library[1]) is a 16th-century convolution of three 15th-century fechtbuch manuscripts, with a total of 221 pages. The inside of the cover is inscribed 1549. Vom baumanns 108, suggesting that the manuscript belonged to one Michael Baumann, listed as a mercenary by profession in the tax registers of Augsburg between 1471 and 1495.[2] The manuscript came in the possession of Paulus Hector Mair in 1556.[3] After Mair's execution in 1579, the ms. may have passed to the library of Marcus Fugger, whose library was sold by his grandson in 1653, passing into the Oettingen-Wallerstein library.Contents1 Contents1.1 Part A 1.2 Part B 1.3 Part C2 See also 3 References 4 External linksContents[edit] Part A treats fighting with the longsword, dagger and messer
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Polearm
A pole weapon or pole arm is a close combat weapon in which the main fighting part of the weapon is fitted to the end of a long shaft, typically of wood, thereby extending the user's effective range. Spears, glaives, poleaxes, halberds, and naginata are all varieties of pole arms. The purpose of using pole weapons is either to extend reach or to increase leverage (thanks to hands moving freely on a pole) and thus increase striking power. Because they contain relatively little metal, pole arms are cheap to make. This has made them the favored weapon of peasant levies and peasants in rebellion the world over. Many are adapted from farm implements, or other tools. Pole arms were common weapons on medieval European battlefields. Their range and impact force made them effective weapons against armored warriors on horseback, because they could penetrate armor. The Renaissance saw a plethora of different varieties
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PDF
The Portable Document
Document
Format (PDF) is a file format developed in the 1990s to present documents, including text formatting and images, in a manner independent of application software, hardware, and operating systems.[3][4] Based on the PostScript
PostScript
language, each PDF file encapsulates a complete description of a fixed-layout flat document, including the text, fonts, vector graphics, raster images and other information needed to display it
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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