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Florence Of Worcester
Florence of Worcester (died 1118), known in Latin as Florentius, was a monk of Worcester, who played some part in the production of the Chronicon ex chronicis, a Latin world chronicle which begins with the creation and ends in 1140.[1] The nature and extent of his contributions remain unclear. The usual starting point for an examination of his career is the notice of his death in the final entry for the year 1118 in the Chronicon:“ On 7 July, the Worcester monk Florence died. His meticulous learning and scholarly labours have made this chronicle of chronicles [chronicarum chronica] outstanding among all others.His body is covered by earth, his soul searches the skies. There in the sight of God may he reign among the saints for ever. Amen.”— Chronicon ex chronicis, s.a
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Worcester Abbey
Worcester
Worcester
Cathedral, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England, situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Worcester. Its official name is the Cathedral
Cathedral
Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. The present cathedral church was built between 1084 and 1504, and represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic
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Durham Liber Vitae
The Durham Liber Vitae is a confraternity book produced in north-eastern England in the Middle Ages. It records the names of visitors to the church of the bishopric of Durham, and its predecessor sees at Lindisfarne
Lindisfarne
and Chester-le-Street
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Henry William Carless Davis
Henry William Carless Davis, CBE, FBA (13 January 1874 in Ebley, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
– 28 June 1928 in Edinburgh, Scotland) was a British historian, editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, and Oxford Regius Professor of Modern History.Contents1 Early career 2 War years 3 Return to Oxford 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksEarly career[edit] Davis was born in Ebley, near Stroud, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
the eldest of five children of Henry Frederick Alexander Davis, a solicitor, and his wife, Jessie Anna. The children were brought up by their mother, who moved to Weymouth in 1884 to open a school for young children including her own, and was successful enough to be appointed first headmistress of Weymouth College
Weymouth College
preparatory school in 1903
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Michael Lapidge
Michael Lapidge, FBA (born 8 February 1942[1]) is a scholar in the field of Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
literature, particularly that composed in Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
during the period 600–1100 AD; he is an emeritus Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge
Clare College, Cambridge
and Fellow of the British Academy,[2] and winner of the 2009 Sir Israel Gollancz Prize.[3]Contents1 Education and career 2 Publications 3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 ReferencesEducation and career[edit] Lapidge completed his B.A. at the University of Calgary
University of Calgary
and taught there for three years after completing an M.A. (U of Alberta), before going to the University of Toronto
University of Toronto
in 1967 to begin work on a Ph.D. in the Centre for Medieval Studies
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Vitalis Of Savigny
Saint Vitalis of Savigny (ca. 1060 – 16 September 1122) was the canonized founder of Savigny Abbey
Savigny Abbey
and the Congregation of Savigny (1112). Life[edit] He was born Vital de Mortain
Mortain
in Normandy
Normandy
at Tierceville
Tierceville
near Bayeux about 1060-5. His parents were Rainfred le Vieux and Rohais
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Titulus (inscription)
Titulus (Latin "inscription" or "label", the plural tituli is also used in English) is a term used for the labels or captions naming figures or subjects in art, which were commonly added in classical and medieval art, and remain conventional in Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
icons. In particular the term describes the conventional inscriptions on stone that listed the honours of an individual[1] or that identified boundaries in the Roman Empire
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Samson (Bishop Of Worcester)
Samson (died 5 May 1112) was a medieval English clergyman who was Bishop of Worcester
Bishop of Worcester
from 1096 to 1112.Contents1 Life 2 Citations 3 References 4 Further readingLife[edit] Samson was a Royal Chaplain and a canon and Treasurer of the diocese of Bayeux.[1] In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Samson is referred to as the chaplain and is recorded as holding St. Peter's Collegiate Church, Wolverhampton
St. Peter's Collegiate Church, Wolverhampton
and considerable properties in southern Staffordshire, most of which he sublet to either the canons of St
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William Of Malmesbury
William of Malmesbury
Malmesbury
(Latin: Willelmus Malmesbiriensis; c. 1095 – c. 1143) was the foremost English historian of the 12th century. He has been ranked among the most talented English historians since Bede. Modern historian C. Warren Hollister described him as "a gifted historical scholar and an omnivorous reader, impressively well versed in the literature of classical, patristic and earlier medieval times as well as in the writings of his own contemporaries. Indeed William may well have been the most learned man in twelfth-century Western Europe."[1] William was born about 1095 or 1096[2] in Wiltshire
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Simon Keynes
Simon Douglas Keynes, FBA (/ˈkeɪnz/ KAYNZ; born 23 September 1952) is the current Elrington and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic at Cambridge
Cambridge
University, and a Fellow of Trinity College.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Major works 3 Biography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Keynes is the fourth and youngest son of Richard Darwin Keynes and his wife Anne Adrian, and thus a member of the Keynes family (and, by extension, of the Darwin-Wedgwood family). His elder brothers are the conservationist and author Randal Keynes
Randal Keynes
and the medical scientist and fellow fellow of Trinity Roger Keynes
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Hemming (monk)
Hemming (occasionally Heming) was a monk, author and compiler in medieval England from around the time of the Norman conquest of England. He was a senior brother at Worcester Cathedral
Worcester Cathedral
Priory, and his significance derives from the monastic cartulary (and works therein) attributed to him. Hemming's name is Scandinavian, which may mean either he or his ancestors were Scandinavians settled in England. His birth and death dates are unknown, but he was actively writing soon after the Conquest. Hemming became a sub-prior in the Worcester cathedral priory.[1] He is named in both the Liber Vitae of Worcester Cathedral as well as a list of members of the cathedral chapter that was compiled during the episcopate of Samson, the bishop from 1096 to 1112.[2] Hemming was the eponymous author and compiler of a work usually called Hemming's Cartulary
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Hemming's Cartulary
Hemming's Cartulary
Cartulary
is a manuscript cartulary, or collection of charters and other land records, collected by a monk named Hemming around the time of the Norman Conquest of England. The manuscript comprises two separate cartularies that were made at different times and later bound together; it is in the British Library
British Library
as MS Cotton Tiberius A xiii. The first was composed at the end of the 10th or beginning of the 11th century. The second section was compiled by Hemming and was written around the end of the 11th or the beginning of the 12th century. The first section, traditionally titled the Liber Wigorniensis, is a collection of Anglo-Saxon charters
Anglo-Saxon charters
and other land records, most of which are organized geographically
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