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Flood
A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land that is usually dry.[1] The European Union
European Union
(EU) Floods Directive defines a flood as a covering by water of land not normally covered by water.[2] In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Floods are an area of study of the discipline hydrology and are of significant concern in agriculture, civil engineering and public health. Flooding may occur as an overflow of water from water bodies, such as a river, lake, or ocean, in which the water overtops or breaks levees, resulting in some of that water escaping its usual boundaries,[3] or it may occur due to an accumulation of rainwater on saturated ground in an areal flood
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Public Health
Public health
Public health
is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals."[1] Analyzing the health of a population and the threats is the basis for public health.[2] The "public" in question can be as small as a handful of people, an entire village or it can be as large as several continents, in the case of a pandemic. "Health" takes into account physical, mental and social well-being. It is not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, according to the World Health
Health
Organization.[3] Public health
Public health
is interdisciplinary. For example, epidemiology, biostatistics and health services are all relevant
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Atlanta
Atlanta
Atlanta
(/ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and most populous city of the state of Georgia in the United States. With an estimated 2016 population of 472,522,[12] it is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta
Atlanta
metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States.[6] Atlanta
Atlanta
is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the "New South". During the 1960s, Atlanta
Atlanta
became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr
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NASA
The National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration ( NASA
NASA
/ˈnæsə/) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.[note 1] President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
established NASA
NASA
in 1958[10] with a distinctly civilian (rather than military) orientation encouraging peaceful applications in space science
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Terra (satellite)
Terra (EOS AM-1) is a multi-national NASA
NASA
scientific research satellite in a Sun-synchronous
Sun-synchronous
orbit around the Earth.[1] It is the flagship of the Earth
Earth
Observing System (EOS). The name "Terra" comes from the Latin
Latin
word for Earth. A naming contest was held by NASA
NASA
among U.S. high school students. The winning essay was submitted by Sasha Jones of Brentwood, Missouri. The identifier "AM-1" refers to its orbit, passing over the equator in the morning.Contents1 Launch 2 Mission 3 Malicious cyber activities 4 Gallery of images by Terra 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLaunch[edit] The satellite was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base
Vandenberg Air Force Base
on December 18, 1999, aboard an Atlas IIAS
Atlas IIAS
vehicle and began collecting data on February 24, 2000
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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Civil Engineering
Civil engineering
Civil engineering
is a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment, including works like roads, bridges, canals, dams, airports, sewerage systems, pipelines and railways.[1][2] Civil engineering
Civil engineering
is traditionally broken into a number of sub-disciplines
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Lake
A lake is an area filled with water, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land, apart from any river or other outlet that serves to feed or drain the lake.[1] Lakes lie on land and are not part of the ocean, and therefore are distinct from lagoons, and are also larger and deeper than ponds, though there are no official or scientific definitions.[2] Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. Most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams. Natural lakes are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age
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Natal, Rio Grande Do Norte
Natal (Brazilian Portuguese: [naˈtaw],[1] "Christmas") is the capital and largest city of the state Rio Grande do Norte, located in northeastern Brazil. According to IBGE's July 2014 report, the city had a total population of 862,044, while Greater Natal
Greater Natal
had 1,485,505 inhabitants. The implementation of the Via Costeira
Via Costeira
(Coastal Highway), 10 km (6.2 miles) long avenue along the shore and the dunes, was the true starting point for the beginning of tourist activity in the State in the 1980s. The main hotels are concentrated along Via Costeira
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Property
Property, in the abstract, is what belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing
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Drown
Drowning
Drowning
is defined as respiratory impairment from being in or under a liquid.[1] It is further classified by outcome into: death, ongoing health problems, and no ongoing health problems.[1] Drowning
Drowning
itself is quick and silent, although it may be preceded by distress which is more visible.[2] Generally, in the early stages of drowning, very little water enters the lungs: a small amount of water entering the trachea causes a muscular spasm that seals the airway and prevents the passage of both air and water until unconsciousness occurs. This means a person drowning is unable to shout or call for help, or seek attention, as they cannot obtain enough air
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Domestic Animals
This page gives a list of domestic animals,[1] also including a list of animals which are or may be undergoing the process of domestication and animals that have an extensive relationship with humans beyond simple predation. This includes species which are semi-domesticated, undomesticated but captive-bred on a commercial scale, or commonly wild-caught, at least occasionally captive-bred, and tameable. In order to be considered fully domesticated, most species have undergone significant genetic, behavioural and/or morphological changes from their wild ancestors; while others have been changed very little from their wild ancestors despite hundreds or thousands of years of potential selective breeding. A number of factors determine how quickly any changes may occur in a species, however, there isn't always a desire to improve a species from its wild form
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Waterway
A waterway is any navigable body of water. Broad distinctions are useful to avoid ambiguity, and disambiguation will be of varying importance depending on the nuance of the equivalent word in other languages. A first distinction is necessary between maritime shipping routes and waterways used by inland water craft
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Old English Language
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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