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Fleet Air Arm
1914 (As the Royal Naval Air Service) 1924 (as the naval branch of the Royal Air Force) 1937 (as part of Naval Service)CountryAllegiance Queen Elizabeth IIBranch  Royal NavySize 5,000 personnel Approx
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List Of Senior Officers Of The Royal Navy
An officer is a person who has a position of authority in a hierarchical organization. The term derives from the late Latin from officiarius, meaning "official".Contents1 Examples1.1 Military 1.2 Shipping industry 1.3 Law enforcement 1.4 Politics and government 1.5 Ceremonial and other contextsExamples[edit] Military[edit] Officer
Officer
(armed forces)Shipping industry[edit]Captain (nautical), the person in charge of a merchant ship Chief officer or chief mate, typically the person in charge of the deck department of a merchant ship Second officer or second mate, typically the navigator and medical officer on a merchant ship Third officer or third mate, typically the safety officer on a merchant ship Chief Engineering Officer. The person in charge of the technical department on a merchant ship. Second Engineering Officer. The person in charge of the engine room on a merchant ship. Third Engineering Officer
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Royal Highness
Royal Highness (abbreviated HRH for His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness) is a style used to address or refer to some members of royal families, usually princes and princesses but not normally monarchs or their spouses of equal rank to them (that is, not kings, queens regnant, or queens consort), who are usually styled Majesty. When used as a direct form of address, spoken or written, it takes the form "Your Royal Highness". When used as a third-person reference, it is gender-specific (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness, both abbreviated HRH) and, in plural, Their Royal Highnesses (TRH).Contents1 Origin 2 African usage 3 Holy Roman Empire 4 Kingdom of the Netherlands 5 United Kingdom 6 Denmark 7 Sweden 8 Saudi Arabia 9 See also 10 ReferencesOrigin[edit] By the 17th century, all local rulers in Italy adopted the style Highness, that was once used by kings and emperors only
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Royal Navy Chaplaincy Service
A chaplain is a cleric (such as a minister, priest, pastor, rabbi, or imam), or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel. Though originally the word chaplain referred to representatives of the Christian
Christian
faith,[1][2] it is now also applied to people of other religions or philosophical traditions–such as the case of chaplains serving with military forces
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British Armed Forces
The British Armed Forces,[nb 3] also known as Her Majesty's Armed Forces or the Armed Forces of the Crown, are the military services responsible for the defence of the United Kingdom, its overseas territories and the Crown dependencies. They also promote Britain's wider interests, support international peacekeeping efforts and provide humanitarian aid.[7] Since the formation of a Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
in 1707 (later succeeded by the United Kingdom),[8] the armed forces have seen action in a number of major wars involving the world's great powers, including the Seven Years' War, the Napoleonic Wars, the Crimean War, the First World War, and the Second World War
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Cargo Aircraft
A cargo aircraft (also known as freight aircraft, freighter, airlifter or cargo jet) is a fixed-wing aircraft that is designed or converted for the carriage of cargo rather than passengers. Such aircraft usually do not incorporate passenger amenities and generally feature one or more large doors for loading cargo
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BAE Systems Hawk
The BAE Systems
BAE Systems
Hawk is a British single-engine, jet-powered advanced trainer aircraft. It was first flown at Dunsfold, Surrey, in 1974 as the Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
Hawk, and subsequently produced by its successor companies, British Aerospace
British Aerospace
and BAE Systems, respectively. It has been used in a training capacity and as a low-cost combat aircraft. Operators of the Hawk include the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(notably the Red Arrows display team) and a considerable number of foreign military operators
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Trainer (aircraft)
A trainer is a class of aircraft designed specifically to facilitate flight training of pilots and aircrews. The use of a dedicated trainer aircraft with additional safety features—such as tandem flight controls, forgiving flight characteristics and a simplified cockpit arrangement—allows pilots-in-training to safely advance their real-time piloting, navigation and warfighting skills without the danger of overextending their abilities alone in a fully featured aircraft.[citation needed] Civilian pilots are normally trained in a light aircraft, with two or more seats to allow for a student and instructor
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Surveillance Aircraft
A surveillance aircraft is an aircraft used for surveillance—collecting information over time. They are operated by military forces and other government agencies in roles such as intelligence gathering, battlefield surveillance, airspace surveillance, observation (e.g. artillery spotting), border patrol and fishery protection. This article concentrates on aircraft used in those roles, rather than for traffic monitoring, law enforcement and similar activities. Surveillance
Surveillance
aircraft usually carry no armament, or only limited defensive armament. A surveillance aircraft does not necessarily require high-performance capability or stealth characteristics. It may be a modified civilian aircraft. Surveillance
Surveillance
aircraft have also included moored balloons (e.g
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Patrol Aircraft
A maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), also known as a patrol aircraft, maritime reconnaissance aircraft, or by the older American term patrol bomber, is a fixed-wing aircraft designed to operate for long durations over water in maritime patrol roles — in particular anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-ship warfare (AShW), and search and rescue (SAR).Contents1 History1.1 World War I 1.2 World War II 1.3 Post–World War II2 Armament and countermeasures 3 Sensors 4 Examples 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]SS class airshipWorld War I[edit] The first aircraft that would now be identified as maritime patrol aircraft were flown by the Royal Naval Air Service
Royal Naval Air Service
and the French Aéronautique Maritime
Aéronautique Maritime
during World War I, primarily on anti-submarine patrols
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Attack Aircraft
An attack aircraft, strike aircraft, or attack bomber, is a tactical military aircraft that has a primary role of carrying out airstrikes with greater precision than bombers, and is prepared to encounter strong low-level air defenses while pressing the attack.[1] This class of aircraft is designed mostly for close air support and naval air-to-surface missions, overlapping the tactical bomber mission. Designs dedicated to non-naval roles are often known as ground-attack aircraft.[2] Fighter aircraft
Fighter aircraft
often carry out the attack role, although they would not be considered attack aircraft per se, although fighter-bomber conversions of those same aircraft would be considered part of the class. Strike fighters, which have effectively replaced the fighter-bomber and light bomber concepts, also differ little from the broad concept of an attack aircraft. The dedicated attack aircraft as a separate class existed primarily during and after World War II
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Naval Ensign
A naval ensign is an ensign used by naval ships of various countries to denote their nationality. It can be the same or different from a country's civil ensign or state ensign. It can also be known as a war ensign. A large version of a naval ensign which is flown on a warship's mast just before going into battle is called a battle ensign. An ensign differs from a jack, which is flown from a jackstaff at the bow of a vessel. Most countries have only one national flag and ensign for all purposes. In other countries, a distinction is made between the land flag and the civil, state and naval ensigns. The elaborate British ensigns, for example, differ from the flag used on land, the Union Flag, and have different versions of plain and defaced Red and Blue ensigns for civilian and state use, besides the naval ensign (White Ensign)
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Roundel
A roundel is a circular disc used as a symbol. The term is used in heraldry, but also commonly used to refer to a type of national insignia used on military aircraft, generally circular in shape and usually comprising concentric rings of different colours. Other symbols also often use round shapes.Contents1 Heraldry 2 Military aircraft 3 Flags 4 In popular culture 5 Examples5.1 Military aircraft
Military aircraft
roundels 5.2 Other roundels6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHeraldry[edit] Main article: Roundel
Roundel
(heraldry) In heraldry, a roundel is a circular charge. Roundels are among the oldest charges used in coats of arms, dating from at least the twelfth century
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Beechcraft Super King Air
The Beechcraft
Beechcraft
Super King Air family is part of a line of twin-turboprop aircraft produced by Beechcraft. The Model 200 and Model 300 series were originally marketed as the "Super King Air" family, but the "Super" was dropped in 1996.[3] They form the King Air line together with the King Air Model 90 and 100 series.[4] Beechcraft
Beechcraft
currently offers the 250 (design. B200GT[2]) and the larger 350i (B300[2]) models.[5] The 350ER (B300CER[2]) is available to government, military and commercial customers for special mission operations[6] such as aerial survey, air ambulance, flight inspection and surveillance.[7] The Beechcraft
Beechcraft
1900 regional airliner was derived from the Model B200 King Air.[8] The Super King Air family has been in continuous production since 1974,[9] the longest production run of any civilian turboprop aircraft in its class
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Iraq War
Invasion
Invasion
phase (2003)  United States  United Kingdom  Australia  Poland Peshmerga Supported by:  Canada[1]  Netherlands[2] Invasion
Invasion
phase (2003) Ba'athist IraqPost-invasion (2003–11)  United
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Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI
George VI
and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII
King Edward VIII
in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
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