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Fjölnir
Fjölnir
Fjölnir
(Old Norse: Fjǫlnir, lit. "Manifold" or "Multiplier"[1]) is a legendary king in Norse mythology
Norse mythology
said to have been the son of Freyr
Freyr
(Frey) and his consort Gerðr
Gerðr
(Gertha). The name appears in a variety of forms, including Fiolnir, Fjölner, Fjolner, and Fjolne. He was claimed as the progenitor of the Swedish Yngling dynasty, reigning from Gamla Uppsala. According to the Grottasöngr, Fjölnir
Fjölnir
lived from the 1st century BC to the early 1st century AD. Fjölnir
Fjölnir
was said to have drowned in a vat of mead while visiting Peace-Fróði, a similarly-legendary king of Zealand, the Danish island
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Boydell & Brewer
Boydell & Brewer is an academic press based in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England
England
that specializes in publishing historical and critical works. In addition to British and general history, the company publishes three series devoted to studies, editions, and translations of material related to the Arthurian legend. There are also series that publish studies in medieval German and French literature, Spanish theatre, early English texts, in other subjects. Depending on the subject, its books are assigned to one of several imprints in Woodbridge, Cambridge (UK), or Rochester, New York, location of its principal North American office. Imprints include Boydell & Brewer, D.S
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Asgard
In Norse religion, Asgard
Asgard
(Old Norse: Ásgarðr; "Enclosure of the Æsir"[1]) is one of the Nine Worlds and home to the Æsir
Æsir
tribe of gods. It is surrounded by an incomplete wall attributed to a Hrimthurs riding the stallion Svaðilfari, according to Gylfaginning
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Albert Engström
Albert Engström (1869 – 1940) was a Swedish artist, author and member of the Swedish Academy from 1922.[1]Contents1 Author and Artist 2 Translations 3 References 4 External linksAuthor and Artist[edit] Engström was born in Lönneberga, Kalmar County (Småland) but spent most of his childhood in Hult (near Eksjö), where his father was the railroad stationmaster. He graduated from Norrköping secondary school in 1888 and went to Uppsala University the following year to read Latin and Greek, a pursuit which he abandoned after two years. In 1892 he enrolled at the Valand School of Fine Arts in Gothenburg to study under Carl Larsson.[1] Between 1894 and 1896 Albert Engström was on the editorial staff for the satirical publication Söndags-Nisse. In 1897 he founded the humor magazine Strix. Among the themes of his many illustrations were those of tramps and drunkards, and indeed alcohol, or rather its adverse effects, featured largely in his humour
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Historia Norwegiæ
Historia Norwegiæ is a short history of Norway
Norway
written in Latin by an anonymous monk. The only extant manuscript is in the private possession of the Earl of Dalhousie, and is kept at Brechin Castle, Scotland. However, the manuscript itself is fragmented; the Historia itself is in folios 1r-12r. Recent dating efforts place it somewhere c. 1500-1510A.<[1] The original text appears to have been written earlier than the manuscript itself; the text refers to both a volcanic eruption and an earthquake in 1211 as contemporary events,[2] and Orkney
Orkney
is stated to be under Norwegian rule.Contents1 Contents 2 Notable 3 Dates 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksContents[edit] Historia Norwegiæ consists of three parts:I. A short geographical survey of Norway
Norway
and its dominions, followed by a brief history of Norway II. Genealogy of the Earls of Orkney III
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Íslendingabók
Íslendingabók (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈistlɛntiŋkaˌpouk], Old Norse pronunciation: [ˈiːslɛndɪŋgaˌboːk], Book of Icelanders; Latin: Libellus Islandorum) is a historical work dealing with early Icelandic history. The author was an Icelandic priest, Ari Þorgilsson, working in the early 12th century. The work originally existed in two different versions but only the younger one has survived. The older contained information on Norwegian kings, made use of by later writers of kings' sagas. The priest Jón Erlendsson in Villingaholt (died 1672) in the service of bishop Brynjólfur Sveinsson
Brynjólfur Sveinsson
made two copies of Íslendingabók (now AM 113 a fol and AM 113 b fol at the Árni Magnússon
Árni Magnússon
Institute for Icelandic Studies), the latter one because the bishop was unhappy with the first version. The original copied from is assumed to have dated to ca. 1200
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Gesta Danorum
Gesta Danorum
Gesta Danorum
("Deeds of the Danes") is a patriotic work of Danish history, by the 13th century author Saxo Grammaticus
Saxo Grammaticus
("Saxo the Literate", literally "the Grammarian"). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark
Denmark
and is an essential source for the nation's early history. It is also one of the oldest known written documents about the history of Estonia and Latvia. Consisting of sixteen books written in Latin
Latin
on the invitation of Archbishop
Archbishop
Absalon, Gesta Danorum
Gesta Danorum
describes Danish history and to some degree Scandinavian history in general, from prehistory to the late 12th century
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Hadingus
Hadingus
Hadingus
was one of the earliest legendary Danish kings according to Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum, where he has a detailed biography. Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
and others have argued that Hadingus
Hadingus
was partially modelled on the god Njörðr.Contents1 Gesta Danorum 2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesGesta Danorum[edit] Hadingus
Hadingus
is the legendary the son of Gram of Denmark
Gram of Denmark
and Signe, the daughter of Finnish King Sumble. Gram steals Signe from her wedding, kills the husband (Henry, King of Saxony) and takes her to Denmark, where Hadingus
Hadingus
is born. When Gram is killed by Swipdag, King of Norway, Hadingus
Hadingus
is taken to Sweden and is fostered by the giant Wagnofthus and his daughter Harthgrepa
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Hunding
Hunding
Hunding
is a municipality in the district of Deggendorf
Deggendorf
in Bavaria
Bavaria
in Germany. References[edit]^ "Fortschreibung des Bevölkerungsstandes". Bayerisches Landesamt für Statistik und Datenverarbeitung (in German). January 2018. v t eTowns and municipalities in DeggendorfAholming Auerbach Außernzell Bernried Buchhofen Deggendorf Grafling Grattersdorf Hengersberg Hunding Iggensbach Künzing Lalling Metten Moos Niederalteich Oberpöring Offenberg Osterhofen Otzing Plattling Schaufling Schöllnach Stephansposching Wallerfing WinzerAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 249071802 GND: 4257437-7This Deggendorf
Deggendorf
district location article is a stub
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Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
(French: [dymezil]; 4 March 1898 – 11 October 1986, Paris) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Proto-Indo-European religion
Proto-Indo-European religion
and society. He is considered one of the major contributors to mythography, in particular for his formulation of the trifunctional hypothesis of social class in ancient societies.Contents1 Biography 2 Criticism 3 Works in English 4 Works 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit]Book signed by Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
and offered to Maurice Halbwachs. Maurice Halbwachs
Maurice Halbwachs
Collection of Human and Social Sciences Library Paris Descartes-CNRSThis section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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Faroese Language
Faroese[4] (/ˌfɛəroʊˈiːz, -ˈiːs/; Faroese: føroyskt mál, pronounced [ˈføːɹɪst ma:l]; Danish: færøsk, pronounced [ˈfɛɐ̯ˌøːˀsɡ]) is a North Germanic language spoken as a first language by about 66,000 people, 45,000 of whom reside on the Faroe Islands
Faroe Islands
and 21,000 in other areas, mainly Denmark. It is one of five languages descended from Old West Norse spoken in the Middle Ages, the others being Norwegian, Icelandic, and the extinct Norn and Greenlandic Norse
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Odin
In Germanic mythology, Odin
Odin
(from Old Norse
Old Norse
Óðinn) is a widely revered god. In Norse mythology, from which stems most of the information about the god, Odin
Odin
is associated with wisdom, healing, death, royalty, the gallows, knowledge, battle, sorcery, poetry, frenzy, and the runic alphabet, and is the husband of the goddess Frigg
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Temple At Uppsala
The Temple at Uppsala
Temple at Uppsala
was a religious center in the ancient Norse religion once located at what is now Gamla Uppsala
Gamla Uppsala
(Swedish "Old Uppsala"), Sweden
Sweden
attested in Adam of Bremen's 11th-century work Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum and in Heimskringla, written by Snorri Sturluson
Snorri Sturluson
in the 13th century
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Grímnismál
Grímnismál
Grímnismál
(Sayings of Grímnir) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. It is preserved in the Codex Regius
Codex Regius
manuscript and the AM 748 I 4to fragment. It is spoken through the voice of Grímnir, one of the many guises of the god Odin. The very name suggests guise, or mask or hood. Through an error, King Geirröth tortured Odin-as-Grímnir, a fatal mistake, since Odin
Odin
caused him to fall upon his own sword. The poem is written mostly in the ljóðaháttr metre,[1] typical for wisdom verse.Contents1 Structure and history 2 Synopsis 3 In popular culture 4 References 5 External linksStructure and history[edit] The work starts out with a lengthy prose section describing the circumstances leading up to Grímnir's monologue. The monologue itself comprises 54 stanzas of poetic verse describing the worlds and Odin's many guises
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Geirröd
In Norse mythology, Geirröd was a jötunn and the father of the giantesses Gjálp
Gjálp
and Greip. The story of Geirröd is told in Þórsdrápa. Loki, while flying as a hawk, was captured by Geirröd. Because he hated Thor, Geirröd demanded that Loki
Loki
bring his enemy to Geirröd's castle without his magic belt and hammer. Loki
Loki
agreed to lead Thor
Thor
to the trap. On the way to Geirröd's castle, Loki
Loki
and Thor
Thor
stopped at the home of Grid, a giantess
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Reginsmál
Reginsmál
Reginsmál
("Reginn's sayings") or Sigurðarkviða Fáfnisbana II ("Second Lay of Sigurd
Sigurd
Fáfnir's Slayer") is an Eddic poem, found in the Codex Regius
Codex Regius
manuscript. The poem is unnamed in the manuscript, where it follows Grípisspá
Grípisspá
and precedes Fáfnismál, but modern scholars regard it as a separate poem and have assigned it names for convenience. The poem, if regarded as a single unit, is disjoint and fragmentary, consisting of stanzas both in ljóðaháttr and fornyrðislag. The first part relates Loki's dealings with Andvari. Interpolated with prose passages, the poem moves on to Sigurd's relationship with Reginn and the advice given to him by Odin. References[edit]Reginsmol Translation and commentary by Henry A. Bellows The Second Lay of Sigurd
Sigurd
Fafnicide Translation by Benjamin Thorpe Reginsmál. The Lay of Regin
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