HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Five Boroughs Of The Danelaw
The Five Boroughs or The Five Boroughs of the Danelaw
Danelaw
(Old Norse: Fimm Borginn) were the five main towns of Danish Mercia
Mercia
(what is now the East Midlands). These were Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Nottingham
Nottingham
and Stamford. The first four later became county towns.Contents1 Establishment and rule1.1 Derby 1.2 Leicester 1.3 Lincoln 1.4 Nottingham 1.5 Stamford2 The Danish burhs to the south2.1 Northampton 2.2 Bedford 2.3 Huntingdon 2.4 Cambridge3 Anglo-Saxon and Danish reconquest 4 Earldom of the Five Boroughs 5 See also 6 ReferencesEstablishment and rule[edit] Viking raids began in England in the late 8th century, and were largely of the 'hit and run' sort.[1] However, in 865 various Viking armies combined and landed in East Anglia, not to raid but to conquer the four Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England
[...More...]

"Five Boroughs Of The Danelaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
[...More...]

"Old Norse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Legionary
The Roman legionary (Latin: legionarius, pl. legionarii) was a professional heavy infantryman of the Roman army
Roman army
after the Marian reforms. Legionaries had to be Roman citizens under the age of 45. They enlisted in a legion for twenty-five years of service, a change from the early practice of enlisting only for a campaign. The last five years were on veteran lighter duties. At the end of their service, Roman legionaries received a small allotment of land or a monetary equivalent.[1]Contents1 Immunes 2 Equipment 3 Training and discipline 4 Other legionaries 5 See also 6 References6.1 General books 6.2 Other books7 External linksImmunes[edit] Regular trained legionaries were known as milites and were the equivalent in rank of the modern private. Included in the ranks, aside from the milites, were the immunes, specialist soldiers with secondary roles such as engineer, artilleryman, drill and weapons instructor, carpenter and medic
[...More...]

"Roman Legionary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edward The Elder
Edward the Elder
Edward the Elder
(c. 874 – 17 July 924) was King of the Anglo-Saxons from 899 until his death. He was the elder son of Alfred the Great and his wife Ealhswith. When Edward succeeded to the throne, he had to defeat a challenge from his cousin Æthelwold, who had a strong claim as the son of Alfred's elder brother and predecessor, Æthelred. Alfred had succeeded Æthelred as king of Wessex
Wessex
in 871, and almost faced defeat against the Danish Vikings until his decisive victory at the Battle of Edington
Battle of Edington
in 878. After the battle, the Vikings still ruled Northumbria, East Anglia and eastern Mercia, with only Wessex and western Mercia
Mercia
under Anglo-Saxon control
[...More...]

"Edward The Elder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hertford
Hertford
Hertford
(/ˈhɑːrtfərd/ HART-fərd, locally /ˈhɑːrfərd/ HAR-fərd) is the county town of Hertfordshire, England, and is also a civil parish in the East Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
district of the county. Forming a civil parish, the 2011 census put the population of Hertford
Hertford
at about 26,000.[2]Contents1 Toponomy 2 Governance 3 Geography 4 History 5 Economy 6 Sport and leisure6.1 Football 6.2 Cricket7 People 8 Landmarks 9 Transport9.1 Rail 9.2 Road 9.3 Bus and coach 9.4 River10 Education 11 Entertainment 12 Town twinning 13 References 14 External linksToponomy[edit] The earliest reference to the town appears in the Ecclesiastical History of the English People, written by Bede
Bede
in 731 AD, which refers to "Herutford"
[...More...]

"Hertford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Warwick
Warwick
Warwick
(/ˈwɒrɪk/) is the county town of Warwickshire, England. It lies on the River Avon, 11 miles (18 km) south of Coventry
Coventry
and just west of Leamington Spa
Leamington Spa
and Whitnash, with which it is contiguous. At the 2011 Census, the population was 31,345. Signs of human activity date back to the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, and constant habitation to the 6th century AD. Warwick
Warwick
was a Saxon burh in the 9th century, and Warwick Castle
Warwick Castle
was established in 1068 during the Norman conquest of England. Warwick School
Warwick School
claims to be the country's oldest boys' school. The earldom of Warwick, created in 1088, controlled the town in the Middle Ages and built town walls, of which Eastgate and Westgate survive. The castle grew into a stone fortress, then a country house
[...More...]

"Warwick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Towcester
Towcester
Towcester
(/ˈtoʊstər/ TOH-stər), the Roman town of Lactodorum, is an affluent market town in south Northamptonshire, England.Contents1 Etymology 2 Location 3 Demography and expansion 4 Governance 5 Facilities 6 Sport 7 History7.1 Prehistoric and Roman periods 7.2 Saxon period and Medieval age 7.3 Georgian and Victorian periods 7.4 20th century and beyond8 Notable people from Towcester 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit]
[...More...]

"Towcester" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edmund I
Edmund I
Edmund I
(Old English: Ēadmund, pronounced [æːɑdmund]; 921 – 26 May 946) was King of the English
King of the English
from 939 until his death. His epithets include the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, and the Magnificent. Edmund was the son of Edward the Elder
Edward the Elder
and his third wife Eadgifu of Kent, and a grandson of Alfred the Great. His father died when he was young, and was succeeded by his oldest son Æthelstan. Edmund came to the throne upon the death of his half-brother in 939, apparently with little opposition. His reign was marked by almost constant warfare, including conquests or reconquests of the Midlands, Northumbria, and Strathclyde (the last of which was ceded to Malcolm I of Scotland). Edmund was assassinated after six-and-a-half years as king, while attending mass in Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire
[...More...]

"Edmund I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Wulfstan I, Archbishop Of York
Wulfstan (died December 956) was Archbishop of York
Archbishop of York
between 931 and 952. He is often known as Wulfstan I, to separate him from Wulfstan II, Archbishop of York.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Citations 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Wulfstan was consecrated in 931.[1] He was presumably appointed with the consent of King Æthelstan, and attested all of the king's charters between 931 and 935. Between 936-41, however, he was absent from the king's court, for unknown reasons.[2] Career[edit] His career is characterised by frequent swapping of allegiances, both among Viking leaders from Dublin
Dublin
and the Wessex kings
[...More...]

"Wulfstan I, Archbishop Of York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ratae Corieltauvorum
Coordinates: 52°38′06″N 1°08′29″W / 52.6349°N 1.1413°W / 52.6349; -1.1413The Jewry Wall, remains of the Roman baths Ratae Corieltauvorum
Ratae Corieltauvorum
or simply Ratae was a town in the Roman province of Britannia. Today it is known as Leicester, located in the English county of Leicestershire.Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Prehistory 2.2 Roman2.2.1 Establishment 2.2.2 Development2.3 Medieval3 Remains 4 References 5 External linksName[edit] Ratae is a latinate form of the Brittonic word for "ramparts" (cf. Gaelic rath), suggesting the site was an Iron Age oppidum
[...More...]

"Ratae Corieltauvorum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kingdom Of Lindsey
The Kingdom of Lindsey
Kingdom of Lindsey
or Linnuis (Old English: Lindesege) was a lesser Anglo-Saxon kingdom, which was absorbed into Northumbria
Northumbria
in the 7th century.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Kings of Lindsey3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksGeography[edit] Lindsey lay between the Humber
Humber
estuary and the Wash, forming its inland boundaries from the courses of the Witham and Trent rivers, and the Foss Dyke
Foss Dyke
between them. A marshy region south of the Humber
Humber
known as the Isle of Axholme was also included
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Lindsey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Torksey
Torksey
Torksey
is a small village in the West Lindsey
West Lindsey
district of Lincolnshire, England
[...More...]

"Torksey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ivar The Boneless
Ivar the Boneless
Ivar the Boneless
(Old Norse: Ívarr hinn Beinlausi; Old English: Hyngwar) was a Viking
Viking
leader and a commander who invaded what is now England. According to the Tale of Ragnar Lodbrok, he was the son of Ragnar Loðbrok
Ragnar Loðbrok
and Aslaug. His brothers included Björn Ironside, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Hvitserk, Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye and Ubba. The origin of the nickname is not certain. The sagas describe him as lacking bones. A genetic condition, osteogenesis imperfecta, is known to cause the body to appear to have "an imperfect bone formation", because the body and limbs can bend off beyond the usual joint limitations, and produce other ill effects and degrading functions. It was known by the Ancient Greeks and Romans
[...More...]

"Ivar The Boneless" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mercia
Mercia
Mercia
(/ˈmɜːrʃiə, -ʃə/;[1] Old English: Miercna rīce) was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
Heptarchy. The name is a Latinisation of the Old English
Old English
Mierce or Myrce, meaning "border people" (see March). The kingdom was centred on the valley of the River Trent
River Trent
and its tributaries, in the region now known as the English Midlands. The kingdom's "capital" was the town of Tamworth, which was the seat of the Mercian Kings from at least c. 584, when King Creoda built a fortress at the town. For 300 years (between 600 and 900), having annexed or gained submissions from five of the other six kingdoms of the Heptarchy
Heptarchy
(East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex), Mercia
Mercia
dominated England south of the River Humber: this period is known as the Mercian Supremacy
[...More...]

"Mercia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

River Trent
The River Trent
River Trent
is the third-longest river in the United Kingdom. Its source is in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
on the southern edge of Biddulph Moor. It flows through and drains most of the metropolitan central and northern Midlands south and east of its source north of Stoke-on-Trent. The river is known for dramatic flooding after storms and spring snowmelt, which in past times often caused the river to change course. The river passes through Stoke-on-Trent, Burton upon Trent
Burton upon Trent
and Nottingham
Nottingham
before joining the River Ouse at Trent Falls
Trent Falls
to form the Humber
Humber
Estuary, which empties into the North Sea
North Sea
between Hull in Yorkshire
Yorkshire
and Immingham
Immingham
in Lincolnshire
[...More...]

"River Trent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ealdorman
An ealdorman (from Old English ealdorman, lit. "elder man"; plural: "ealdormen") was a high-ranking royal official and prior magistrate of an Anglo-Saxon shire or group of shires from about the ninth century to the time of King Cnut. The term "ealdorman" was rendered in Latin as dux in early West Saxon charters, and as præfectus (which is also the equivalent of gerefa, modern reeve, from which sheriff or shire reeve is derived)
[...More...]

"Ealdorman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.