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First Vision
The First Vision
The First Vision
(also called the grove experience) refers to a vision that Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
said he received in the spring of 1820, in a wooded area in Manchester, New York, which his followers call the Sacred Grove. Smith described it as a personal theophany in which he received instruction from God. Smith's followers believe the vision reinforces his authority as the founder and prophet of the Latter Day Saint movement. According to the account Smith told in 1838, he went to the woods to pray about which church to join but fell into the grip of an evil power that nearly overcame him. At the last moment, he was rescued by two shining "personages" (implied to be Jesus
Jesus
and God the Father) who hovered above him
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Second Great Awakening
The Second Great Awakening
Great Awakening
was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States. The movement began around 1790, gained momentum by 1800 and, after 1820, membership rose rapidly among Baptist
Baptist
and Methodist
Methodist
congregations whose preachers led the movement. It was past its peak by the late 1850s. The Second Great Awakening reflected Romanticism
Romanticism
characterized by enthusiasm, emotion, and an appeal to the super-natural. It rejected the skeptical rationalism and deism of the Enlightenment. The revivals enrolled millions of new members in existing evangelical denominations and led to the formation of new denominations
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George Edward Anderson
George Edward Anderson (October 28, 1860 – May 9, 1928) was an early American photographer known for his portraiture and documentary photographs of early Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints historical sites and Utah settlements.Contents1 Biography1.1 LDS mission 1.2 Later years2 Legacy 3 Selected works 4 Notes 5 External linksBiography[edit] George Edward Anderson was born in Salt Lake City, Utah and apprenticed as a teenager under photographer Charles Roscoe Savage.[1] At Savage’s Art Bazar Studio, Anderson became friends with fellow apprentices John Hafen and John F. Bennett. Hafen later become an accomplished artist and Bennett was instrumental in preserving Anderson’s glass plate negatives.[2]:11[1][3] At seventeen, Anderson established his photography studio in Salt Lake City with his brothers, Stanley and Adam. The railroad allowed Anderson to establish tent studios in Manti, Utah, Springville, Utah and Nephi, Utah
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Richard Lloyd Anderson
Richard Lloyd Anderson (born 1926) is an emeritus professor of Church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University
Brigham Young University
(BYU). His book Investigating the Book of Mormon
Book of Mormon
Witnesses is widely considered the definitive LDS ('Mormon') work on this subject.[1] Anderson is the brother of Karl Ricks Anderson.Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Anderson was born in Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
to Lloyd Anderson and his wife Agnes Ricks. His father was an advertising executive with local newspapers. His family moved in later years so he attended high school in Provo, Ogden and Pocatello. Anderson served in the United States Naval Air Corps
United States Naval Air Corps
during World War II.[2] He was a radio-man because of an overbite that disqualified him from being a pilot
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Samuel H. Smith (Latter Day Saints)
Samuel Harrison Smith (13 March 1808 – 30 July 1844) was a younger brother of Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Samuel was a leader in his own right and a successful missionary. Smith is commonly regarded as the first Latter Day Saint missionary following the organization of the Church of Christ by his brother, Joseph. One of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon's golden plates, Samuel Smith remained devoted to his church throughout his life.Contents1 Early life 2 Book of Mormon witness and church establishment 3 Latter Day Saint missionary 4 High council and other church service 5 Death 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further readingEarly life[edit] Born in Tunbridge, Vermont, to Joseph Smith, Sr., and Lucy Mack Smith, Samuel moved with his family to western New York by the 1820s
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Richard Bushman
Richard Lyman Bushman (born June 20, 1931) is an American historian and Gouverneur Morris
Gouverneur Morris
Professor of History emeritus at Columbia University. Bushman has been called "one of the most important scholars of American religious history [of the late 20th century]", and in 2012 a $3 million donation was made to the University of Virginia
University of Virginia
to establish the Richard Lyman Bushman Chair of Mormon Studies in his honor.[1] He also serves as one of three general editors of the Joseph Smith Papers.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Honors 3 Publications 4 See also 5 References5.1 Footnotes 5.2 Works cited6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Richard L
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Jan Shipps
Jo Ann Barnett "Jan" Shipps[1] (born 1929) is an American historian specializing in Mormon History, particularly in the latter half of the 20th century to the present. Shipps is generally regarded as the foremost non-Mormon scholar of the Latter Day Saint movement, having given particular attention to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Her first book on the subject was Mormonism: The Story of a New Religious Tradition published by the University of Illinois Press. Recently, The University of Illinois Press published her book Sojourner in the Promised Land: Forty Years Among the Mormons, in which she interweaves her own history of Mormon-watching with 16 essays on Mormon history and culture. Contents1 Career as a scholar1.1 Theories and arguments 1.2 Recent contributions2 Scholarly associations 3 Publications 4 Notes 5 External linksCareer as a scholar[edit] Shipps has a Ph.D. in history
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D. Michael Quinn
Dennis Michael Quinn (born March 26, 1944) is an American historian who has focused on the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was a professor at Brigham Young University (BYU) from 1976 until he resigned in 1988
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Seer Stones (Latter Day Saints)
According to Latter Day Saint theology, seer stones were stones that were sacred gifts from God. They are believed to have been used by Joseph Smith, as well as ancient prophets, to receive revelations from God. Some other early Latter Day Saints also possessed and used seer stones. Smith owned at least two seer stones, which he had earlier employed for treasure seeking before he founded the church.[3] Other early Mormons, such as Hiram Page, David Whitmer, and Jacob Whitmer, also owned seer stones.[4] Seer stones are mentioned in the Book of Mormon in the Book of Mosiah, where they are also called "interpreters" and described as being used by seers to translate and receive revelations. The term "Urim and Thummim" is usually used by Latter Day Saints members to refer to the "interpreters" mentioned in the Book of Mormon
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Folk Magic
In religious studies and folkloristics, folk religion, popular religion, or vernacular religion comprises various forms and expressions of religion that are distinct from the official doctrines and practices of organized religion. The precise definition of folk religion varies among scholars. Sometimes also termed popular belief, it consists of ethnic or regional religious customs under the umbrella of a religion, but outside official doctrine and practices.[1] The term "folk religion" is generally held to encompass two related but separate subjects. The first is the religious dimension of folk culture, or the folk-cultural dimensions of religion
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Lyons (village), New York
Lyons is a hamlet in Wayne County, New York, in the United States. The population was 3,619 at the 2010 census. It is located in the southern half of the town of Lyons. The hamlet and the town are named after Lyon
Lyon
(sometimes spelled Lyons), France. Originally, named "The Forks" , Lyons was renamed by Land agent, George Williamson. Lyons is the county seat of Wayne County. It was an incorporated village from 1854 through 2015. The hamlet is east of the city of Rochester. Government offices for the Town of Lyons are located in the hamlet.[3]Contents1 History1.1 Dissolution2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 Housing4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The community was settled around 1789[1] and incorporated as a village in 1854.[2] The Erie Canal, which once went through the center of the village, was rerouted to the south when it was enlarged in the 1850s. Later, the canal conformed roughly to the bed of the Clyde River
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Stained Glass
The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works created from it. Throughout its thousand-year history, the term has been applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches, mosques and other significant buildings. Although traditionally made in flat panels and used as windows, the creations of modern stained glass artists also include three-dimensional structures and sculpture. Modern vernacular usage has often extended the term "stained glass" to include domestic leadlight and objets d'art created from came glasswork exemplified in the famous lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany. As a material stained glass is glass that has been coloured by adding metallic salts during its manufacture. The coloured glass is crafted into stained glass windows in which small pieces of glass are arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead and supported by a rigid frame
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Prophecy
A prophecy is a message that is claimed by a prophet to have been communicated to them by a god. Such messages typically involve inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of divine will concerning the prophet's social world and events to come (compare divine knowledge). All known ancient cultures had prophets who delivered prophecies.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definitions 3 Bahá'í Faith 4 Buddhism 5 China 6 Christianity6.1 Later Christianity 6.2 Latter Day
Day
Saint movement7 Islam 8 Judaism 9 Native American prophecy 10 Nostradamus 11 Skepticism 12 Psychology 13 See also 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External linksEtymology[edit] The English noun "prophecy", in the sense of "function of a prophet" appeared from about 1225, from Old French
Old French
profecie (12th century), and from prophetia, Greek propheteia "gift of interpreting the will of God", from Greek prophetes (see prophet)
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Joseph Smith, Sr.
Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
Sr. (July 12, 1771 – September 14, 1840) was the father of Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
Jr., the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Joseph Sr. was also one of the Eight Witnesses
Eight Witnesses
of the Book
Book
of Mormon, which Mormons believe was translated by Smith Jr. from golden plates. In 1833, Smith Sr. was named the first patriarch of the Church of Christ (which was renamed to the Church of the Latter Day Saints[1] in 1834 and Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints[2][3] in 1838). Joseph Sr. was also a member of the First Presidency
First Presidency
of the church and a Freemason
Freemason
in Ontario Lodge No
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Lucy Mack Smith
Lucy Mack Smith
Lucy Mack Smith
(July 8, 1775 – May 14, 1856) was the mother of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. She is noted for writing the memoir, Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations and was an important leader of the movement during Joseph's life.Contents1 Background and early life 2 Marriage and children 3 Book
Book
of Mormon 4 Church leadership 5 Family deaths 6 Succession crisis 7 Ancestry and descendants 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBackground and early life[edit] Lucy Mack was born on July 8, 1775, in Gilsum, New Hampshire, during an era of political, economic, and social change. The second half of the eighteenth century had seen a slowly evolving shift of responsibilities within the American family. Even though the Revolutionary War would accelerate that shift, the initial impetus came from the changing economic scene
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Manchester, New York
Manchester
Manchester
is a town in Ontario County, New York, United States. The population was 9,395 at the 2010 census. The town was named after one of its villages, which in turn was named after the original Manchester in England.[3] The Town of Manchester
Manchester
includes a village also named Manchester. The town is northeast of the city of Canandaigua.Contents1 The Lehigh Valley Railroad 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Communities and locations in the Town of Manchester 5 References 6 External linksThe Lehigh Valley Railroad[edit] See Lehigh Valley Railroad
Lehigh Valley Railroad
for more information. Manchester
Manchester
was an important division point and car classification yard for the Lehigh Valley Railroad
Lehigh Valley Railroad
and was, at one time, the largest such facility in the world. As a division point, crews and locomotives were exchanged
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