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First Epistle Of Clement
The First Epistle
Epistle
of Clement (Ancient Greek: Κλήμεντος πρὸς Κορινθίους, translit. Klēmentos pros Korinthious, lit. 'Clement to Corinthians') is a letter addressed to the Christians in the city of Corinth. The letter was composed at some time between AD 70 and AD 140, and ranks with Didache
Didache
as one of the earliest—if not the earliest—of extant Christian documents outside the canonical New Testament. As the name suggests, a Second Epistle
Epistle
of Clement is known, but this is a later work by a different author
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Gospel Of The Nazarenes
The Gospel of the Nazarenes
Gospel of the Nazarenes
(also Nazareans, Nazaraeans, Nazoreans, or Nazoraeans) is the traditional but hypothetical name given by some scholars to distinguish some of the references to, or citations of, non-canonical Jewish-Christian Gospels
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Apocalypse
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Apocalypse
Apocalypse
depicted in Christian Orthodox traditional fresco scenes in Osogovo Monastery, Republic of MacedoniaSt. John at Patmos: the receiving of an apocalyptic visionAn apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering"[1]) is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation
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Martyrdom Of Polycarp
The Martyrdom of Polycarp
Polycarp
is one of the works of the Apostolic Fathers, and as such is one of the very few writings from the actual age of the persecutions. Polycarp
Polycarp
was Bishop of Smyrna around the years AD 155-160 (possibly AD 170-180). The letter as a whole takes influence from both Jewish martyrdom texts in the Old Testament and the Gospels
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Gnostic Gospels
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism HinduismGnostic sectsList of Gnostic sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianismSamaritan Baptist sectsDositheos Simon Magus
Simon Magus
(Simonians) Menander Basilides
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Jewish–Christian Gospels
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
New Testamen

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Apocalypse Of Stephen
The Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of Stephen is one of the New Testament apocrypha's texts. The Stephen in question is one of the Seven Deacons
Seven Deacons
to the Apostles. The text describes a conflict at the very beginnings of Christianity about the nature of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth. Stephen appears on the scene and recounts Revelation as a literal truth, to which the crowd declare blasphemy, and Caiaphas
Caiaphas
has him arrested and beaten. The text then has Stephen appear before Pilate whom he tells to not speak, and orders him to recognize Jesus. The tale is set before Paul of Tarsus' conversion, and so proceeds to describe how Paul persecutes Stephen by having him crucified
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Gospel Of Barnabas
The Gospel
Gospel
of Barnabas
Barnabas
is a book depicting the life of Jesus, which claims to be by the biblical Barnabas
Barnabas
who in this work is one of the twelve apostles. Two manuscripts are known to have existed, both dated to the late 16th or early 17th centuries, with one written in Italian and the other in Spanish. The Spanish manuscript is now lost, its text surviving only in a partial 18th-century transcript.[1] Barnabas
Barnabas
is about the same length as the four canonical gospels put together, with the bulk being devoted to an account of Jesus' ministry, much of it harmonized from accounts also found in the canonical gospels
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Apocalypse Of Paul
The Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of Paul (Apocalypsis Pauli, more commonly known in the Latin tradition as the Visio Pauli or Visio sancti Pauli) is a third-century text of the New Testament apocrypha.[1] The original version of the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
is
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Coptic Apocalypse Of Paul
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism HinduismGnostic sectsList of Gnostic sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianismSamaritan Baptist sectsDositheos Simon Magus
Simon Magus
(Simonians) Menander Basilides
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Apocalypse Of Peter
The Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of Peter (or Revelation of Peter) is an early Christian text of the 2nd century and an example of apocalyptic literature with Hellenistic overtones. It is not in the Bible, but is mentioned in the Muratorian fragment, the oldest surviving list of New Testament
New Testament
books, which also states it was not allowed to be read in church by others. The text is extant in two incomplete versions of a lost Greek original, one Koine Greek,[1] and an Ethiopic
Ethiopic
version,[2] which diverge considerably. As compiled by William MacComber and others, the number of Ethiopic
Ethiopic
manuscripts of this same work continue to grow
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Gnostic Apocalypse Of Peter
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism Hinduism Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsList of Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianism


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Apocalypse Of Pseudo-Methodius
Written in Syriac in the late seventh century, the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of Pseudo-Methodius shaped and influenced Christian eschatological thinking in the Middle Ages.[1][2][3][4] Falsely attributed to Methodius of Olympus,[5] a fourth century Church Father, the work attempts to make sense of the Islamic Conquest of the Mediterranean world.[6] The Apocalypse
Apocalypse
is noted for incorporating numerous aspects of Christian eschatology
Christian eschatology
such as the invasion of Gog and Magog, the rise of the Antichrist, and the tribulations that precede the end of the world. The Apocalypse, however, adds a new element to Christian eschatology: the rise of a messianic Roman emperor
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Apocalypse Of Thomas
The Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of Thomas is a work from the New Testament apocrypha, apparently composed originally in Greek. It concerns the end of the world, and appears to be a rendering of the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of John,[citation needed] although written in a somewhat less enigmatic or mystical manner. It is the inspiration for the popular medieval millennial list Fifteen Signs before Doomsday.[1] The text was written in Greek between the second and the fourth century, and was either copied or translated in Latin in Italy or North Africa. There are two recensions of the text, the second one of which containing an interpolation apparently written in the fifth century. It was widespread in Northwestern Europe, with manuscripts dating between the eighth and the eleventh century
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Third Epistle To The Corinthians
The Third Epistle
Epistle
to the Corinthians is a pseudepigraphical text under the name of Paul the Apostle. It is also found in the Acts of Paul, and was framed as Paul's response to the Epistle
Epistle
of the Corinthians to Paul. The earliest extant copy is Papyrus Bodmer X, dating to the third century.[1] Originally written in Greek, the letter survives in Greek, Coptic, Latin, and Armenian manuscripts.[2][1]Contents1 Content and theological background 2 Canonicity 3 References 4 External linksContent and theological background[edit] The text is structured as an attempt to correct alleged misinterpretations of the earlier First and Second Epistle
Epistle
to the Corinthians of which the author (usually called "pseudo-Paul") has become aware due to the (similarly dubious) Epistle
Epistle
of the Corinthians to Paul
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First Apocalypse Of James
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism Hinduism Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsList of Gnostic
Gnostic
sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianism


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