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Firestarter (firewall)
Firestarter is a personal firewall tool that uses the Netfilter (iptables/ipchains) system built into the Linux
Linux
kernel. It has the ability to control both inbound and outbound connections. Firestarter provides a graphical interface for configuring firewall rules and settings. It provides real-time monitoring of all network traffic for the system
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Port Forwarding
In computer networking, port forwarding or port mapping is an application of network address translation (NAT) that redirects a communication request from one address and port number combination to another while the packets are traversing a network gateway, such as a router or firewall
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Linux Distribution
A Linux
Linux
distribution (often abbreviated as distro) is an operating system made from a software collection, which is based upon the Linux kernel and, often, a package management system. Linux
Linux
users usually obtain their operating system by downloading one of the Linux distributions, which are available for a wide variety of systems ranging from embedded devices (for example, OpenWrt) and personal computers (for example, Linux
Linux
Mint) to powerful supercomputers (for example, Rocks Cluster Distribution). A typical Linux
Linux
distribution comprises a Linux
Linux
kernel, GNU
GNU
tools and libraries, additional software, documentation, a window system (the most common being the X Window System), a window manager, and a desktop environment
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Endian Firewall
Endian Firewall
Endian Firewall
is an open-source router, firewall and gateway security Linux
Linux
distribution developed by the South Tyrolean company Endian. The product is available as either free software, commercial software with guaranteed support services, or as a hardware appliance (including support services).Contents1 Short Description 2 License 3 Features3.1 Gateway 3.2 Firewall & Security 3.3 Server Services 3.4 User Management 3.5 Logging & Monitoring 3.6 Others4 History and compared to the original 5 Resonance 6 References 7 External linksShort Description[edit] The Endian Firewall
Endian Firewall
is a turnkey Linux
Linux
security distribution, which is an independent, unified security management operating system. The Endian Firewall
Endian Firewall
is based on a hardened Linux
Linux
operating system
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Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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BSD
Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD) was a Unix
Unix
operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Today, the term "BSD" is often used non-specifically to refer to any of the BSD descendants which form a branch of the family of Unix-like
Unix-like
operating systems. Operating systems derived from the original Berkeley source code, such as FreeBSD
FreeBSD
and OpenBSD, remain actively developed and widely used. BSD was initially called Berkeley Unix
Unix
because it shared the same source code with AT&T Research Unix
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SourceForge
SourceForge
SourceForge
is a Web-based service that offers software developers a centralized online location to control and manage free and open-source software projects. It provides a source code repository, bug tracking, mirroring of downloads for load balancing, a wiki for documentation, developer and user mailing lists, user-support forums, user-written reviews and ratings, a news bulletin, micro-blog for publishing project updates, and other features. SourceForge
SourceForge
was one of the first to offer this service free of charge to open source projects.[5][discuss] Since 2012 the website runs on Apache Allura software
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Squid (software)
Squid is a caching and forwarding HTTP
HTTP
web proxy. It has a wide variety of uses, including speeding up a web server by caching repeated requests, caching web, DNS and other computer network lookups for a group of people sharing network resources, and aiding security by filtering traffic. Although primarily used for HTTP
HTTP
and FTP, Squid includes limited support for several other protocols including Internet
Internet
Gopher, SSL,[6] TLS and HTTPS. Squid does not support the SOCKS protocol. Squid was originally designed to run as a daemon on Unix-like
Unix-like
systems. A Windows port was maintained up to version 2.7
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GUI Widget
A control element (sometimes called a control or widget) in a graphical user interface is an element of interaction, such as a button or a scroll bar. Controls are software components that a computer user interacts with through direct manipulation to read or edit information about an application. User interface libraries such as Windows Presentation Foundation, GTK+, and Cocoa, contain a collection of controls and the logic to render these.[1] Each widget facilitates a specific type of user-computer interaction, and appears as a visible part of the application's GUI as defined by the theme and rendered by the rendering engine. The theme makes all widgets adhere to a unified aesthetic design and creates a sense of overall cohesion. Some widgets support interaction with the user, for example labels, buttons, and check boxes
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Free And Open-source Software
Free and open-source software
Free and open-source software
(FOSS) is software that can be classified as both free software and open-source software.[a] That is, anyone is freely licensed to use, copy, study, and change the software in any way, and the source code is openly shared so that people are encouraged to voluntarily improve the design of the software.[3] This is in contrast to proprietary software, where the software is under restrictive copyright and the source code is usually hidden from the users. The benefits of using FOSS can include decreased software costs, increased security and stability (especially in regard to malware), protecting privacy, education, and giving users more control over their own hardware. Free, open-source operating systems such as Linux and descendants of BSD
BSD
are widely utilized today, powering millions of servers, desktops, smartphones (e.g
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Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) is a network management protocol used on TCP/IP
TCP/IP
networks whereby a DHCP server dynamically assigns an IP address
IP address
and other network configuration parameters to each device on a network so they can communicate with other IP networks.[1] A DHCP server enables computers to request IP addresses and networking parameters automatically from the Internet service provider (ISP), reducing the need for a network administrator or a user to manually assign IP addresses to all network devices.[1] In the absence of a DHCP server, a computer or other device on the network needs to be manually assigned an IP address. DHCP can be implemented on networks ranging in size from home networks to large campus networks and regional Internet service provider networks.[2] A router or a residential gateway can be enabled to act as a DHCP server
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GTK+
GTK+
GTK+
(formerly GIMP
GIMP
Toolkit) is a cross-platform widget toolkit for creating graphical user interfaces.[2] It is licensed under the terms of the GNU
GNU
Lesser General Public License, allowing both free and proprietary software to use it
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Linux Kernel
The Linux
Linux
kernel is an open-source monolithic Unix-like
Unix-like
computer operating system kernel. The Linux
Linux
family of operating systems is based on this kernel and deployed on both traditional computer systems such as personal computers and servers, usually in the form of Linux distributions,[9] and on various embedded devices such as routers, wireless access points, PBXes, set-top boxes, FTA receivers, smart TVs, PVRs, and NAS appliances. The Android operating system for tablet computers, smartphones, and smartwatches uses services provided by the Linux
Linux
kernel to implement its functionality. While the adoption on desktop computers is low, Linux-based operating systems dominate nearly every other segment of computing, from mobile devices to mainframes
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Software License
A software license is a legal instrument (usually by way of contract law, with or without printed material) governing the use or redistribution of software. Under United States copyright law all software is copyright protected, in source code as also object code form.[2] The only exception is software in the public domain. A typical software license grants the licensee, typically an end-user, permission to use one or more copies of software in ways where such a use would otherwise potentially constitute copyright infringement of the software owner's exclusive rights under copyright law.Contents1 Software
Software
licenses and copyright law1.1 Ownership vs
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Repository (version Control)
In revision control systems, a repository[1] is an on-disk data structure which stores metadata for a set of files or directory structure. Depending on whether the version control system in use is distributed (for instance, Git
Git
or Mercurial) or centralized (Subversion or Perforce, for example), the whole set of information in the repository may be duplicated on every user's system or may be maintained on a single server
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