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Financial Economics
Financial economics
Financial economics
is the branch of economics characterized by a "concentration on monetary activities", in which "money of one type or another is likely to appear on both sides of a trade".[1] Its concern is thus the interrelation of financial variables, such as prices, interest rates and shares, as opposed to those concerning the real economy. It has two main areas of focus:[2] asset pricing (or "investment theory") and corporate finance; the first being the perspective of providers of capital, i.e
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Demand
In economics, demand is the quantity of a commodity or a service that people are willing or able to buy at a certain price, per unit of time.[1] The relationship between price and quantity demanded is also known as demand curve. Preferences and choices, which underlie demand, can be represented as functions of cost, benefit, odds and other variables. Determinants of (Factors affecting) demand Innumerable factors and circumstances could affect a buyer's willingness or ability to buy a good. Some of the common factors are:Good's own price: The basic demand relationship is between potential prices of a good and the quantities that would be purchased at those prices. Generally the relationship is negative meaning that an increase in price will induce a decrease in the quantity demanded. This negative relationship is embodied in the downward slope of the consumer demand curve. The assumption of a negative relationship is reasonable and intuitive
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Welfare Economics
Welfare
Welfare
economics is a branch of economics that uses microeconomic techniques to evaluate well-being (welfare) at the aggregate (economy-wide) level.[1] A typical methodology begins with the derivation (or assumption) of a social welfare function, which can then be used to rank economically feasible allocations of resources in terms of the social welfare they entail. Such functions typically include measures of economic efficiency and equity, though more recent attempts to quantify social welfare have included a broader range of measures including economic freedom (as in the capability approach). The field of welfare economics is associated with two fundamental theorems
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Expeditionary Economics
Expeditionary economics
Expeditionary economics
is an emerging field of economic enquiry that focuses on the rebuilding and reconstructing of economies in post-conflict nations and providing support to disaster-struck nations. The term was first introduced in 2010 in an essay by Carl Schramm, the former president and CEO of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.[1] It focuses on the need for good economic planning on the part of developed nations to help prevent the creation of failed states. It also emphasizes the need for the structuring on new firms to rebuild the national economies.[2] Since then, the theory has been used by the U.S. Government
U.S. Government
and the U.S. Army
U.S. Army
to restructure the economies of countries such as Iraq
Iraq
and Afghanistan
Afghanistan
and helping Haiti
Haiti
after its severe earthquake
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Demographic Economics
Demographic economics
Demographic economics
or population economics is the application of economic analysis to demography, the study of human populations, including size, growth, density, distribution, and vital statistics.[1][2] Aspects of the subject includemarriage and fertility[1][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] the family[11][12][13][14][15][16][17] divorce[18][19][20] morbidity[21] and life expectancy/mortality[22][23][24] dependency ratios[1][3][25][26][27] migration[28][29][30] population growth[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38] population size[39][40]
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Development Economics
Development economics
Development economics
is a branch of economics which deals with economic aspects of the development process in low income countries. Its focus is not only on methods of promoting economic development, economic growth and structural change but also on improving the potential for the mass of the population, for example, through health, education and workplace conditions, whether through public or private channels.[1]
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Economics Of Digitization
The economics of digitization is the field of economics that studies how digitization affects markets and how digital data can be used to study economics. Digitization
Digitization
is the process by which technology lowers the costs of storing, sharing, and analyzing data. This process has changed how consumers behave, how industrial activity is organized, and how governments operate. The economics of digitization exists as a distinct field of economics for two reasons. First, new economic models are needed because many traditional assumptions about information no longer holds in a digitized world. Second, the new types of data generated by digitization require new methods to analyze. Research in the economics of digitization touches on several fields of economics including industrial organization, labor economics, and intellectual property
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Ecological Economics
Ecological economics
Ecological economics
(also called eco-economics, ecolonomy or bioeconomics of Georgescu-Roegen) is both a transdisciplinary and an interdisciplinary field of academic research addressing the interdependence and coevolution of human economies and natural ecosystems, both intertemporally and spatially.[1] By treating the economy as a subsystem of Earth's larger ecosystem, and by emphasizing the preservation of natural capital, the field of ecological economics is differentiated from environmental economics, which is the mainstream economic a
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Education Economics
Education
Education
economics or the economics of education is the study of economic issues relating to education, including the demand for education, the financing and provision of education, and the comparative efficiency of various educational programs and policies. From early works on the relationship between schooling and labor market outcomes for individuals, the field of the economics of education has grown rapidly to cover virtually all areas with linkages to education.Contents1
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Environmental Economics
Environmental economics
Environmental economics
is a sub-field of economics that is concerned with environmental issues. Quoting from the National Bureau of Economic Research Environmental Economics
Economics
program:... Environmental Economics
Economics
... undertakes theoretical or empirical studies of the economic effects of national or local environmental policies around the world ...
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Evolutionary Economics
Evolutionary economics
Evolutionary economics
is part of mainstream economics[1] as well as a heterodox school of economic thought that is inspired by evolutionary biology. Much like mainstream economics, it stresses complex interdependencies, competition, growth, structural change, and resource constraints but differs in the approaches which are used to analyze these phenomena.[2] Evolutionary economics
Evolutionary economics
deals with the study of processes that transform economy for firms, institutions, industries, employment, production, trade and growth within, through the actions of diverse agents from experience and interactions, using evolutionary methodology[3][4]
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Economic Geography
Economic geography
Economic geography
is the study of the location, distribution and spatial organization of economic activities across the world
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Business Economics
Business
Business
economics is a field in applied economics which uses economic theory and quantitative methods to analyze business enterprises and the factors contributing to the diversity of organizational structures and the relationships of firms with labour, capital and product markets.[1] A professional focus of the journal Business
Business
Economics
Economics
has been expressed as providing "practical information for people who apply economics in their jobs."[2]Contents1 Subject matter 2 Ambiguity in the use of term 3 Interpretations from various universities 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Journals 7 External linksSubject matter[edit] Business
Business
economics is concerned with economic issues and problems related to business organization, management, and strategy
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Health Economics
Health
Health
economics is a branch of economics concerned with issues related to efficiency, effectiveness, value and behavior in the production and consumption of health and healthcare
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Information Economics
Information economics
Information economics
or the economics of information is a branch of microeconomic theory that studies how information and information systems affect an economy and economic decisions. Information has special characteristics: It is easy to create but hard to trust. It is easy to spread but hard to control. It influences many decisions. These special characteristics (as compared with other types of goods) complicate many standard economic theories.[1] The subject of "information economics" is treated under Journal of Economic Literature classification code JEL D8 – Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty. The present article reflects topics included in that code. There are several subfields of information economics. Information as signal has been described as a kind of negative measure of uncertainty.[2] It includes complete and scientific knowledge as special cases
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Labour Economics
Labour economics
Labour economics
seeks to understand the functioning and dynamics of the markets for wage labour. Labour markets or job markets function through the interaction of workers and employers. Labour economics
Labour economics
looks at the suppliers of labour services (workers) and the demanders of labour services (employers), and attempts to understand the resulting pattern of wages, employment, and income. In economics, labour is a measure of the work done by human beings. It is conventionally contrasted with such other factors of production as land and capital
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