HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Financial Tribune
Financial Tribune
Financial Tribune
is a non-governmental newspaper in Iran
Iran
opened in 2014. Its purpose is to cover a variety of political, economic, technology, and social stories.[1] Though it covers a wide gamut of issues, the main focus of the newspaper is on commerce, in particular news/views related to promoting private enterprise in the economy.  Contents1 Profile 2 Causes 3 English Newspapers in Iran 4 See also 5 Financialtribune News Desks 6 ReferencesProfile[edit] The Financial Tribune's Editor-in-Chief is Khosro Ghadiri, the paper's Senior Editor is Amin Sabooni, formerly the Editor-in-Chief of Iran Daily newspaper
[...More...]

"Financial Tribune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rashidun Caliphate
The Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: اَلْخِلَافَةُ ٱلرَّاشِدَةُ‎ al-Khilāfa-al-Rāshidah) (632–661) was the first of the four major caliphates established after the death of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. It was ruled by the first four successive caliphs (successors) of Muhammad
Muhammad
after his death in 632 CE (AH 11). These caliphs are collectively known in Sunni Islam
Islam
as the Rashidun, or "Rightly Guided" caliphs (اَلْخُلَفَاءُ ٱلرَّاشِدُونَ al-Khulafā’ur-Rāshidūn)
[...More...]

"Rashidun Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proto-Elamite
The Proto-Elamite
Proto-Elamite
period is the time from ca. 3400 BC to 2500 BC.[1] In archaeological terms this corresponds to the late Banesh
Banesh
period, and it is recognized as the oldest civilization in Iran. The Proto-Elamite script
Proto-Elamite script
is an Early Bronze Age
Bronze Age
writing system briefly in use before the introduction of Elamite cuneiform.Contents1 Overview 2 Proto-Elamite
Proto-Elamite
script2.1 Inscription corpus 2.2 Decipherment attempts3 See also 4 References 5 Literature 6 External linksOverview[edit]Clay tokens, from Susa, Uruk period, circa 3500 BC
[...More...]

"Proto-Elamite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Institute Of Standards And Industrial Research Of Iran
The Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran (ISIRI; مؤسسهٔ استاندارد و تحقیقات صنعتی ایران) is the Iranian governmental institution for standardization and certification.[1] It is the Iranian representative to International Organization for Standardization. See also[edit]Industry of Iran List of ISIRI standardsReferences[edit]^ "members". ISO
[...More...]

"Institute Of Standards And Industrial Research Of Iran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
[...More...]

"Newspaper Circulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Taxation In Iran
The fiscal year begins on March 21 and ends on March 20 of the next year according to Iranian calendar. The Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs is the government agency authorized to levy and collect taxes
[...More...]

"Taxation In Iran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Iran
The history of Iran, commonly also known as Persia
Persia
in the Western world, is intertwined with the history of a larger region, also to an extent known as Greater Iran, comprising the area from Anatolia, the Bosphorus, and Egypt
Egypt
in the west to the borders of
[...More...]

"History Of Iran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prehistory Of Iran
The prehistory of Iran could be divided to Paleolithic, Epipaleolithic, Neolithic
Neolithic
and Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
periods as follow:Contents1 Paleolithic 2 Epipaleolithic 3 Neolithic 4 Chalcolithic 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingPaleolithic[edit] One of the potential routes for early human migrations toward southern and eastern Asia is Iran, a country characterized by a wide range of geographic variation and resources, which could support early groups of hominins who wandered into the region
[...More...]

"Prehistory Of Iran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Before Common Era
Common Era or Current Era (CE)[1] is a name for a calendar era widely used around the world today. The era preceding CE is known as before the Common or Current Era (BCE). The Current Era notation system can be used as an alternative to the Dionysian era
Dionysian era
system, which distinguishes eras as AD (anno Domini, "[the] year of [the] Lord")[2] and BC ("before Christ"). The two notation systems are numerically equivalent; thus "2018 CE" corresponds to "AD 2018" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC".[2][3][4][a] Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
(and its predecessor, the Julian calendar)
[...More...]

"Before Common Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kura-Araxes Culture
The Kura–Araxes culture
Kura–Araxes culture
or the early trans-Caucasian culture was a civilization that existed from about 4000 BC until about 2000 BC,[1] which has traditionally been regarded as the date of its end; in some locations it may have disappeared as early as 2600 or 2700 BC.[2] The earliest evidence for this culture is found on the Ararat plain; it spread northward in Caucasus
Caucasus
by 3000 BC (but never reaching Colchis[3]). Altogether, the early trans-Caucasian culture enveloped a vast area approximately 1,000 km by 500 km,[4] and mostly encompassed, on modern-day territories, the Southern Caucasus
Caucasus
(except western Georgia), northwestern Iran, the northeastern Caucasus, eastern Turkey, and as far as Syria.[5][6] The name of the culture is derived from the Kura and Araxes river valleys
[...More...]

"Kura-Araxes Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Elam
Elam (/ˈiːləm/) (Elamite: 𒁹𒄬𒆷𒁶𒋾, haltamti,Sumerian: 𒉏𒈠𒆠, NIM.MAki) was an ancient Pre-Iranian civilization centered in the far west and southwest of what is now modern-day Iran, stretching from the lowlands of what is now Khuzestan and Ilam Province as well as a small part of southern Iraq. The modern name Elam stems from the Sumerian transliteration elam(a), along with the later Akkadian elamtu, and the Elamite haltamti. Elamite states were among the leading political forces of the Ancient Near East.[1] In classical literature, Elam was also known as Susiana, which is a name derived from its capital, Susa.[2] Elam was part of the early urbanization during the Chalcolithic period (Copper Age)
[...More...]

"Elam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Foreign Direct Investment In Iran
Foreign direct investment
Foreign direct investment
in Iran
Iran
(FDI) has been hindered by unfavorable or complex operating requirements and by international sanctions, although in the early 2000s the Iranian government liberalized investment regulations. Iran
Iran
ranks 62nd in the World Economic Forum's 2011 analysis of the global competitiveness of 142 countries.[1][2] In 2010, Iran
Iran
ranked sixth globally in attracting foreign investments.[3] Foreign investors have concentrated their activity in a few sectors of the economy: the oil and gas industries, vehicle manufacture, copper mining, petrochemicals, foods, and pharmaceuticals
[...More...]

"Foreign Direct Investment In Iran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Akkadian Empire
Coordinates: 33°6′N 44°6′E / 33.100°N 44.100°E / 33.100; 44.100 Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire𒆳𒌵𒆠 māt Akkadi  (Akkadian) 𒀀𒂵𒉈𒆠 a-ga-de3KI  (Sumerian)c. 2334 – 2154 BCMap of the Akkadian
Akkadian

[...More...]

"Akkadian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kassites
The Kassites
Kassites
(/ˈkæsaɪts/) were people of the ancient Near East, who controlled Babylonia
Babylonia
after the fall of the Old Babylonian Empire
Babylonian Empire
c. 1531 BC and until c. 1155 BC (short chronology). The endonym of the Kassites
Kassites
was probably Galzu,[1] although they have also been referred to by the names Kaššu, Kassi, Kasi or Kashi. They gained control of Babylonia
Babylonia
after the Hittite sack of the city in 1595 BC (i.e
[...More...]

"Kassites" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mannaeans
The Mannaeans
Mannaeans
/məˈniːənz/ (country name usually Mannea; Akkadian: Mannai, possibly Biblical Minni, מנּי) were an ancient people who lived in the territory of present-day northwestern Iran
Iran
south of lake Urmia, around the 10th to 7th centuries BC. At that time they were neighbors of the empires of Assyria
Assyria
and Urartu, as well as other small buffer states between the two, such as Musasir
Musasir
and Zikirta. In the Bible
Bible
(Jeremiah 51:27) the Mannaeans
Mannaeans
are called Minni
[...More...]

"Mannaeans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neo-Assyrian Empire
The Neo-Assyrian Empire
Neo-Assyrian Empire
was an Iron Age
Iron Age
Mesopotamian
[...More...]

"Neo-Assyrian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.