HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Filler (media)
Filler is material of lower cost or quality that is used to fill a certain television time slot or physical medium, such as a musical album.Contents1 Television 2 Music albums 3 See also 4 ReferencesTelevision[edit] In the early days of television, most output was live. The hours of broadcast were limited and so a test card was commonly broadcast at other times. When a breakdown happened during a live broadcast, a standard recording filled in. On the BBC, a film of a potter's wheel was often used for this purpose, filmed at the Compton Potters' Arts Guild.[1] Similar short films, such as a kitten playing, were also used as interludes or interstitial programs to fill gaps in TV schedules
[...More...]

"Filler (media)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cover Version
In popular music, a cover version, cover song, or simply cover, is a new performance or recording by someone other than the original artist or composer of a previously recorded, commercially released song. Before the onset of rock 'n' roll in the 1950s, songs were published and several records of a song might be brought out by singers of the day, each giving it their individual treatment
[...More...]

"Cover Version" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Broadcast Programming
Broadcast
Broadcast
programming is the practice of organizing and/or ordering of broadcast media programs (Internet, television, radio, etc. ) in a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly or season-long schedule. Modern broadcasters use broadcast automation to regularly change the scheduling of their programs to build an audience for a new show, retain that audience, or compete with other broadcasters' programs. In the United Kingdom, this is known as TV listings. Television
Television
scheduling strategies are employed to give programs the best possible chance of attracting and retaining an audience
[...More...]

"Broadcast Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Bus Plunge
Bus
Bus
plunge stories are a nickname for a journalistic practice of reporting bus mishaps in short articles that describe the vehicle as "plunging" from a bridge or hillside road.[1][2] The phenomenon has been noted in the New York Times, which once published as many as 14 "bus plunge" stories per year in its foreign news section.[3] The stories exist not only because of their perceived newsworthiness but because they could be reduced to a few lines and used to fill gaps in the page layout. Further, the words "bus" and "plunge" are short, and can be used in one-column headlines within the narrow, eight-column format that was prevalent in newspapers through the first half of the 20th century. The adoption of computerized layout tools has reduced the need for such filler stories, but news wires continue to carry them.[3] See also[edit]JournaleseNotes[edit]^ "Miracle escape in bus plunge". Thisislocallondon.co.uk
[...More...]

"Bus Plunge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Napster
Napster
Napster
is the name given to three music-focused online services. It was founded as a pioneering peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing Internet service that emphasized sharing digital audio files, typically audio songs, encoded in MP3
MP3
format. The company ran into legal difficulties over copyright infringement. It ceased operations and was eventually acquired by Roxio. In its second incarnation, Napster
Napster
became an online music store until it was acquired by Rhapsody from Best Buy[1] on December 1, 2011. Later companies and projects successfully followed its P2P file sharing example such as Gnutella, Freenet, Kazaa, BearShare, and many others
[...More...]

"Napster" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Courtney Love
Courtney Michelle Love (née Harrison; born July 9, 1964) is an American singer, songwriter, actress, and visual artist. A notable presence in the punk and grunge scenes of the 1990s, Love has enjoyed a career that spans four decades. She rose to prominence as the lead vocalist of the alternative rock band Hole, which she formed in 1989. Love has drawn public attention for her uninhibited live performances and confrontational lyrics, as well as her highly publicized personal life following her marriage to Kurt Cobain. The daughter of countercultural parents, Love had an itinerant childhood: Born in San Francisco, she was raised primarily in Portland, Oregon, where she was in a series of short-lived bands and active in the local punk scene
[...More...]

"Courtney Love" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Remix
A remix is a piece of media which has been altered from its original state by adding, removing, and/or changing pieces of the item. A song, piece of artwork, book, video, or photograph can all be remixes. The only characteristic of a remix is that it appropriates and changes other materials to create something new. Most commonly, remixes are a subset of audio mixing in music and song recordings
[...More...]

"Remix" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Demo (music)
A demo (from "demonstration") is a song or group of songs recorded for limited circulation or reference use rather than for general public release
[...More...]

"Demo (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

B-side
The terms A-side and B-side
A-side and B-side
refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 33 1/3 rpm phonograph records, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records. The A-side usually featured the recording that the artist, record producer, or the record company intended to receive the initial promotional effort and then receive radio airplay, hopefully, to become a "hit" record. The B-side (or "flip-side") is a secondary recording that has a history of its own: some artists released B-sides that were considered as strong as the A-side and became hits in their own right
[...More...]

"B-side" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
[...More...]

"National Diet Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

CD
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
[...More...]

"CD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vinyl Record
A phonograph record (also known as a gramophone record, especially in British English, or record) is an analog sound storage medium in the form of a flat disc with an inscribed, modulated spiral groove. The groove usually starts near the periphery and ends near the center of the disc. At first, the discs were commonly made from shellac; starting in the 1950s polyvinyl chloride became common. In recent decades, records have sometimes been called vinyl records, or simply vinyl, although this would exclude most records made until after World War II. The phonograph disc record was the primary medium used for music reproduction until late in the 20th century. It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and had effectively superseded it by around 1912. Records retained the largest market share even when new formats such as the compact cassette were mass-marketed
[...More...]

"Vinyl Record" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Interstitial Programs
In television programming, an interstitial program (or wraparound program or wraparound segment) refers to a short program which is often shown between movies or other events, e.g. cast interviews after movies on premium channels. The term can also refer to a narrative bridge between segments within a program, such as the live action introductions to the animated segments in the Disney films Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, or the Simpson family's interludes during their annual Treehouse of Horror episodes. Sometimes, if a program finishes earlier than expected, a short extra program may be inserted in the schedule to fill the time until the next scheduled program is due to start. American cable channel TBS commonly aired TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes after shorter-than-average Braves games. For U.S. telecasts of the film The Wizard of Oz between 1959 and 1968, celebrity hosts appeared in wraparound segments
[...More...]

"Interstitial Programs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Potter's Wheel
In pottery, a potter's wheel is a machine used in the shaping (known as throwing) of round ceramic ware. The wheel may also be used during the process of trimming the excess body from dried ware, and for applying incised decoration or rings of colour. Use of the potter's wheel became widespread throughout the Old World
Old World
but was unknown in the Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
New World, where pottery was handmade by methods that included coiling and beating. A potter's wheel may occasionally be referred to as a "potter's lathe". However, that term is better used for another kind of machine that is used for a different shaping process, turning, similar to that used for shaping of metal and wooden articles. The techniques of jiggering and jolleying can be seen as extensions of the potter's wheel: in jiggering, a shaped tool is slowly brought down onto the plastic clay body that has been placed on top of the rotating plaster mould
[...More...]

"Potter's Wheel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.