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Feudalism
Feudalism
Feudalism
was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries
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Liberal Democracy
Liberal democracy
Liberal democracy
is a liberal political ideology and a form of government in which representative democracy operates under the principles of classical liberalism. Also called western democracy, it is characterised by fair, free and competitive elections between multiple distinct political parties, a separation of powers into different branches of government, the rule of law in everyday life as part of an open society and the equal protection of human rights, civil rights, civil liberties and political freedoms for all people. To define the system in practice, liberal democracies often draw upon a constitution, either formally written or uncodified, to delineate the powers of government and enshrine the social contract
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Slovakia
Coordinates: 48°40′N 19°30′E / 48.667°N 19.500°E / 48.667; 19.500Slovak Republic Slovenská republika  (Slovak)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Nad Tatrou sa blýska" "Lightning Over the Tatras"Location of  Slovakia  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Location of Slovakia
Slovakia
in the WorldCapital and largest city Bratislava 48°09′N 17°07′E / 48.150°N 17.117°E / 48.150; 17.117Official languages SlovakEthni
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Roland
Roland
Roland
(Frankish: *Hrōþiland; died 15 August 778) was a Frankish military leader under Charlemagne
Charlemagne
who became one of the principal figures in the literary cycle known as the Matter of France. The historical Roland
Roland
was military governor of the Breton March, responsible for defending Francia's frontier against the Bretons. His only historical attestation is in Einhard's Vita Karoli Magni, which notes he was part of the Frankish rearguard killed by rebellious Basques
Basques
in Iberia at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass. The story of Roland's death at Roncevaux Pass
Roncevaux Pass
was embellished in later medieval and Renaissance literature. He became the chief paladin of the emperor Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and a central figure in the legendary material surrounding him, collectively known as the Matter of France
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Demarchy
In governance, sortition (also known as allotment or demarchy) selects political officials as a random sample from a larger pool of candidates.[1] The logic behind the sortition process originates from the idea that “power corrupts.” For that reason, when the time came to choose individuals to be assigned to empowering positions, the ancient Athenians resorted to choosing by lot
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Chiefdom
A chiefdom is a form of hierarchical political organization in non-industrial societies usually based on kinship, and in which formal leadership is monopolized by the legitimate senior members of select families or 'houses'
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Social Democracy
Social democracy
Social democracy
is a political, social and economic ideology that supports economic and social interventions to promote social justice within the framework of a liberal democratic polity and capitalist economy
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Orava Castle
Orava Castle (Slovak: Oravský hrad, German: Arwaburg, Hungarian: Árva vára), is situated on a high rock above Orava river in the village of Oravský Podzámok, Slovakia. It is considered to be one of the most beautiful castles in Slovakia. The castle was built in the Kingdom of Hungary in the thirteenth century. Many scenes of the 1922 film Nosferatu were filmed here, the castle representing Count Orlok's Transylvanian castle.[1] Orava Castle stands on the site of an old wooden fortification, built after the Mongol invasion of Hungary of 1241
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Chanson De Geste
The chanson de geste, /ʃɑːnˈsɔːn də ˈʒɛst/ Old French
Old French
for "song of heroic deeds" (from gesta: Latin: "deeds, actions accomplished"[1]), is a medieval narrative, a type of epic poem that appears at the dawn of French literature.[2] The earliest known poems of this genre date from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries, before the emergence of the lyric poetry of the trouvères (troubadours) and the earliest verse romances. They reached their apogee in the period 1150–1250.[3] Composed in verse, these narrative poems of moderate length (averaging 4000 lines[4]) were originally sung, or (later) recited, by minstrels or jongleurs
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Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Timocracy
A timocracy (from Greek τιμή timē, "price, worth" and -κρατία -kratia, "rule")[1]in Aristotle's Politics is a state where only property owners may participate in government. The more extreme forms of timocracy, where power derives entirely from wealth with no regard for social or civic responsibility, may shift in their form and become a plutocracy where the wealthy and powerful use their power to increase their wealth. In Plato's Politics, a state in which Love of wealth,Property and power are the Guiding principles of the rulers[2]. Timocracy and property[edit] Solon
Solon
introduced the ideas of timokratia as a graded oligarchy in his Solonian Constitution for Athens
Athens
in the early 6th century BC. His was the first known deliberately implemented form of timocracy, allocating political rights and economic responsibility depending on membership of one of four tiers of the population
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Anarchy
Anarchy
Anarchy
is the condition of a society, entity, group of people, or a single person that rejects hierarchy.[1][2] Colloquially, it can also refer to a society experiencing widespread turmoil and collapse. The word originally meant leaderlessness, but in 1840 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon adopted the term in his treatise What Is Property? to refer to a new political philosophy: anarchism, which advocates stateless societies based on voluntary associations. In practical terms, anarchy can refer to the curtailment or abolition of traditional forms of government and institutions
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Types Of Democracy
Types of democracy refers to kinds of governments or social structures which allow people to participate equally, either directly or indirectly.[1]Contents1 Direct democracies 2 Representative democracies 3 Types based on location 4 Types based on level of freedom 5 Religious democracies 6 Other types of democracy 7 See also7.1 Further types8 References 9 External linksDirect democracies[edit] A direct democracy or pure democracy is a type of democracy where the people govern directly. It requires wide participation of citizens in politics.[2] Athenian democracy
Athenian democracy
or classical democracy refers to a direct democracy developed in ancient times in the Greek city-state of Athens
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Oligarchy
Oligarchy (from Greek ὀλιγαρχία (oligarkhía); from ὀλίγος (olígos), meaning 'few', and ἄρχω (arkho), meaning 'to rule or to command')[1][2][3] is a form of power structure in which power rests with a small number of people. These people might be distinguished by nobility, wealth, family ties, education or corporate, religious or military control. Such states are often controlled by families who typically pass their influence from one generation to the next, but inheritance is not a necessary condition for the application of this term. Throughout history, oligarchies have often been tyrannical, relying on public obedience or oppression to exist
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Aristocracy
Aristocracy (Greek ἀριστοκρατία aristokratía, from ἄριστος aristos "excellent", and κράτος kratos "power") is a form of government that places power in the hands of a small, privileged ruling class.[1] The term derives from the Greek aristokratia, meaning "rule of the best".[2] The term is synonymous with hereditary government, and hereditary succession is its primary philosophy, after which the hereditary monarch appoints officers as they see fit. At the time of the word's origins in ancient Greece, the Greeks conceived it as rule by the best qualified citizens—and often contrasted it favourably with monarchy, rule by an individual
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Plutocracy
Plutocracy (Greek: πλοῦτος, ploutos, 'wealth' + κράτος, kratos, 'rule') or plutarchy, is a form of society defined as being ruled or controlled by a function of wealth or higher income. The first known use of the term was in 1631.[1] Unlike systems such as democracy, capitalism, socialism or anarchism, plutocracy is not rooted in an established political philosophy
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