HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Festival
A festival is an event ordinarily celebrated by a community and centering on some characteristic aspect of that community and its religion or cultures. It is often marked as a local or national holiday, mela, or eid. Next to religion and folklore, a significant origin is agricultural. Food is such a vital resource that many festivals are associated with harvest time. Religious commemoration and thanksgiving for good harvests are blended in events that take place in autumn, such as Halloween
Halloween
in the northern hemisphere and Easter
Easter
in the southern. Festivals often serve to fulfill specific communal purposes, especially in regard to commemoration or thanksgiving. The celebrations offer a sense of belonging for religious, social, or geographical groups, contributing to group cohesiveness
[...More...]

"Festival" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Moveable Feast
A moveable feast or movable feast is an observance in a Christian liturgical calendar that occurs on a different date (relative to the dominant civil or solar calendar) in different years.[1] The most important set of moveable feasts are a fixed number of days before or after Easter Sunday, which varies by over 40 days since it depends partly on the phase of the moon and must be computed each year. In Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
(including the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Eastern Catholic Churches), these moveable feasts form what is called the Paschal cycle, which stands in contrast to the approach taken by Catholic and Protestant Christianity. Most other feast days, such as those of particular saints, are fixed feasts, held on the same date every year
[...More...]

"Moveable Feast" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Idiom
An idiom (Latin: idiomī, "special property", from Ancient Greek: ἰδίωμα, translit. idíōma, "special feature, special phrasing, a peculiarity", f. Ancient Greek: ἴδιος, translit. ídios, "one's own") is a phrase or an expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal, meaning. Categorized as formulaic language, an idiom's figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning.[1] There are thousands of idioms, occurring frequently in all languages. It is estimated that there are at least twenty-five thousand idiomatic expressions in the English language.[2]Contents1 Derivations 2 Compositionality 3 Mobility 4 Translating idioms 5 Dealing with non-compositionality 6 See also 7 References7.1 Bibliography8 External linksDerivations[edit] Many idiomatic expressions, in their original use, were not figurative but had literal meaning
[...More...]

"Idiom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Secular
Secularity
Secularity
(adjective form secular,[1] from Latin
Latin
saeculum meaning "worldly", "of a generation", "temporal", or a span of about 100 years[2]) is the state of being separate from religion, or of not being exclusively allied with or against any particular religion. Historically,
[...More...]

"Secular" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle English
Middle English
Middle English
(ME) is collectively the varieties of the English language spoken after the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
(1066) until the late 15th century; scholarly opinion varies but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period of 1150 to 1500.[2] This stage of the development of the English language
English language
roughly followed the High to the Late Middle Ages. Middle English
Middle English
developed out of Late Old English, seeing many dramatic changes in its grammar, pronunciation and orthography. Writing customs during Middle English
Middle English
times varied widely, but by the end of the period, about 1470, aided by the invention of the printing press, a standard based on the London
London
dialect (Chancery Standard) had become established
[...More...]

"Middle English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
[...More...]

"Old French" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

MV Festivity
The Empire ships were a series of ships in the service of the British Government. Their names were all prefixed with Empire. Mostly they were used during the Second World War by the Ministry of War Transport (MoWT), which owned the ships but contracted out their management to various shipping lines. Some ships requisitioned during the Suez Crisis were also given the Empire prefix. They were acquired from a number of sources
[...More...]

"MV Festivity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swabia
Swabia
Swabia
(/ˈsweɪbiə/;[1] German: Schwaben, colloquially Schwabenland or Ländle; in English also archaic Suabia or Svebia) is a cultural, historic and linguistic region in southwestern Germany. The name is ultimately derived from the medieval Duchy of Swabia, one of the German stem duchies, representing the territory of Alemannia, whose inhabitants interchangeably were called Alemanni or Suebi. This territory would include all of the Alemannic German
Alemannic German
area, but the modern concept of Swabia
Swabia
is more restricted, due to the collapse of the duchy of Swabia
Swabia
in the thirteenth century
[...More...]

"Swabia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antwerp
Antwerp
Antwerp
(/ˈæntwɜːrp/ ( listen), Dutch: Antwerpen [ˈɑntʋɛrpə(n)] ( listen), French: Anvers [ɑ̃vɛʁ(s)]) is a city in Belgium, and is the capital of Antwerp province in Flanders. With a population of 520,504,[2] it is the most populous city proper in Belgium. Its metropolitan area houses around 1,200,000 people, coming in second behind Brussels.[3][4] Antwerp
Antwerp
is on the River Scheldt, linked to the North Sea
North Sea
by the Westerschelde estuary
[...More...]

"Antwerp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
[...More...]

"Ancient Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rameses III
III
III
or iii may refer to:Contents1 Companies 2 Music 3 Other uses 4 See alsoCompanies[edit]Information International, Inc., a computer technology company Innovative Interfaces, Inc., a library-software company 3i, formerly Investors in Industry, a British investment companyMusic[edit] III
III
Records, a Japanese record label III
III
(Orbital EP), 1991 III
[...More...]

"Rameses III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gods
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
[...More...]

"Gods" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Family
In the context of human society, a family (from Latin: familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage or other relationship), or co-residence (as implied by the etymology of the English word "family"[citation needed] [...] from Latin familia 'family servants, domestics collectively, the servants in a household,' thus also 'members of a household, the estate, property; the household, including relatives and servants,' abstract noun formed from famulus 'servant, slave [...]'[1]) or some combination of these.[citation needed] Members of the immediate family may include spouses, parents, brothers, sisters, sons, and daughters[citation needed]. Members of the extended family may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews, nieces, and siblings-in-law[citation needed]
[...More...]

"Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
[...More...]

"God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Group Cohesiveness
Group cohesiveness (also called group cohesion and social cohesion) arises when bonds link members of a social group to one another and to the group as a whole
[...More...]

"Group Cohesiveness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.