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Federal Emergency Relief Administration
The Federal Emergency Relief Administration
Federal Emergency Relief Administration
(FERA) was the new name given by the Roosevelt Administration to the Emergency Relief Administration (ERA) which President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
had created in 1933. FERA was established as a result of the Federal Emergency Relief Act and was replaced in 1935 by the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Prior to 1933, the federal government gave loans to the states to operate relief programs. One of these, the New York state program TERA (Temporary Emergency Relief Administration), was set up in 1931 and headed by Harry Hopkins, a close adviser to Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt asked Congress to set up FERA—which gave grants to the states for the same purpose—in May 1933, and appointed Hopkins to head it
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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William H. Murray
William Henry Davis " Alfalfa
Alfalfa
Bill" Murray (November 21, 1869 – October 15, 1956) was an American teacher, lawyer, and politician who became active in Oklahoma
Oklahoma
before statehood as legal adviser to Governor Douglas H. Johnston of the Chickasaw Nation. Although not American Indian, he was appointed by Johnston as the Chickasaw delegate to the Convention for the proposed State of Sequoyah, and was later elected as a delegate to the 1906 constitutional convention for the proposed state of Oklahoma. Murray was elected as the first Speaker of the Oklahoma
Oklahoma
House of Representatives after statehood, as U.S. Representative, and as the ninth Governor of Oklahoma
Governor of Oklahoma
(1931–1935). His campaign was marked by racist appeal and he supported Jim Crow
Jim Crow
laws
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Assistant Secretary Of The Navy
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Secretary of the Navy
(ASN) is the title given to certain civilian senior officials in the United States Department of the Navy. From 1861 to 1954, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Secretary of the Navy
was the second highest civilian office in the Department of the Navy (reporting to the United States Secretary of the Navy). That role has since been supplanted by the office of Under Secretary of the Navy
Under Secretary of the Navy
and the office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Secretary of the Navy
has been abolished
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Governor Of New York
See also:State Treasurer: abolished in 1926LegislatureState SenatePresident Kathy Hochul
Kathy Hochul
(D)Majority leader John J
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List Of Governors Of New York
The Governor of New York
Governor of New York
is the head of the executive branch of New York's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.[1] The Governor has a duty to enforce state laws, to convene the New York legislature,[1] the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the legislature,[2] and to grant pardons, except in cases of treason and impeachment.[3] Fifty-six individuals have served as Governor, four of whom served non-consecutive terms, totaling 60 distinct terms; the official numbering only lists each Governor once, so there have officially been fifty-six Governors. This numbering includes one acting Governor: the Lieutenant Governor who filled the vacancy after the resignation of the Governor, under the 1777 Constitution.[4] The list does not include people who have acted as Governor when the Governor was out of state, such as Lieutenant Governor Timothy L. Woodruff
Timothy L

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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
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List Of Presidents Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districtsUnited States SenatePresident <
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Third Inauguration Of Franklin D. Roosevelt
An inauguration is a formal ceremony or special event to mark either:the beginning of a major public leader's term of office, or the opening or first public use of a new civic area, organisation or project
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ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (PQDT) is an online database that indexes, abstracts, and provides full-text access to dissertations and theses. The database includes over 2.4 million records and covers 1637 to the present.[1][2] It is produced by ProQuest and was formerly known as ProQuest Digital Dissertations. The bibliographic database (without full text dissertations) is known as Dissertations Abstracts or Dissertations Abstracts International . PQDT annually publishes more than 90% of all dissertations submitted from accredited institutions of higher learning in North America as well as from colleges and universities in Europe and Asia. Over the past 60 years, PQDT has amassed more than 1.4 million titles beginning with the first U.S. dissertation accepted by a university (Yale) in 1861
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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California State Relief Administration
The California State Relief Administration (SRA), created in 1935, was the successor to the State Emergency Relief Administration (SERA), created in 1933. The agencies were responsible for distributing state and federal funds to improve conditions in California during the Great Depression, and administered unemployment relief.[1] References[edit]^ "Inventory of the State Relief Administration Records". Retrieved 2012-03-01. "LearnCalifornia.org - Typical Family on SRA Relief". Retrieved 2012-03-01.  "LearnCalifornia.org - Relief and Agricultural Employees in California". Retrieved 2012-03-01. Further reading[edit]"LearnCalifornia.org - Student: California During the Great Depression". Retrieved 2012-03-01.  "Inventory of the State Relief Administration Records, Administrator's Office, 1933-1941, Series 1". Retrieved 2012-03-01. This California-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis government-related article is a stub
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Key West, Florida
305 and 786 (305 Exchanges: 292,293,294,295,296,809)FIPS code 12-36550[2]GNIS feature ID 0294048[4]Website Official website Key West
Key West
(Spanish: Cayo Hueso) is an island and city in the Straits of Florida
Florida
on the North American continent, at the southwesternmost end of the roadway through the Florida
Florida
Keys in the state of Florida, United States. The island is about 4 miles (6.4 km) long and 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, with a total land mass of 4.2 square miles (11 km2).[5] Duval Street, its main street, is 1.1 miles (1.8 km) in length in its 14-block-long crossing from the Gulf of Mexico to the Straits of Florida
Florida
and the Atlantic Ocean
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Sharecroppers' Union
Founded in 1931 in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, the Sharecroppers’ Union (also known as SCU or Alabama Sharecroppers’ Union) had its origins in the Croppers’ and Farm Workers’ Union (CFWU). Among its first members was Ned Cobb, whose story was told in Theodore Rosengarten’s All God's Dangers: The Life of Nate Shaw.[1] It was founded with the support of the Communist Party and, although theoretically open to all races, its membership by 1933 was solely African-American.[2][3] Its aims were to improve wages and work conditions for sharecroppers, also referred to as tenant farmers.[4] SCU's initial demands included continuation of food advances, which had been suspended by landowners in an attempt to drive down wages; the ASU also demanded the right to sell surplus crops directly in the market rather than having to rely on brokerage by the landowners. They demanded also the right to cultivate small garden plots in order to minimize dependence on the landowners for food
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Southern Tenant Farmers Union
The Southern Tenant Farmers' Union (STFU) was founded in 1934 as a civil farmer's union to organize tenant farmers in the Southern United States.[1] Originally set up during the Great Depression, the STFU was founded to help sharecroppers and tenant farmers get better arrangements from landowners. They were eager to improve their share of profit or subsidies and working conditions. The STFU was established as a response to policies of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA). Part of the New Deal, the AAA was a program to reduce production in order to increase prices of commodities; landowners were paid subsidies, which they were supposed to pass on to their tenants. was designed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to help revive the United States' agricultural industry and to recharge the depressed economy. The AAA called for a reduction in food production, which would, through a controlled shortage of food, raise the price for any given food item through supply and demand
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Tenant Farmer
A tenant farmer is one who resides on land owned by a landlord. Tenant farming is an agricultural production system in which landowners contribute their land and often a measure of operating capital and management; while tenant farmers contribute their labor along with at times varying amounts of capital and management. Depending on the contract, tenants can make payments to the owner either of a fixed portion of the product, in cash or in a combination. The rights the tenant has over the land, the form, and measure of the payment varies across systems (geographically and chronologically). In some systems, the tenant could be evicted at whim (tenancy at will); in others, the landowner and tenant sign a contract for a fixed number of years (tenancy for years or indenture)
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