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Federación Anarquista Ibérica
The Iberian Anarchist
Anarchist
Federation (Spanish: Federación Anarquista Ibérica, FAI) is a Spanish organization of anarchist (anarcho-syndicalist and anarchist-communist) militants active within affinity groups inside the Confederación Nacional del Trabajo
Confederación Nacional del Trabajo
(CNT) anarcho-syndicalist union. It is often abbreviated as CNT-FAI because of the close relationship between the two organizations. The FAI publishes the periodical Tierra y Libertad. The Iberian part of its name alludes to the purpose of unifying Spanish and Portuguese anarchists in a Pan-Iberian organization. The FAI meetings were attended by members of the União Anarquista Portuguesa and the Confederação Geral do Trabalho (including the Zaragoza
Zaragoza
Congress of the CNT in 1936)
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List Of Political Ideologies
In social studies, a political ideology is a certain set of ethical ideals, principles, doctrines, myths or symbols of a social movement, institution, class or large group that explains how society should work and offers some political and cultural blueprint for a certain social order. A political ideology largely concerns itself with how to allocate power and to what ends it should be used. Some political parties follow a certain ideology very closely while others may take broad inspiration from a group of related ideologies without specifically embracing any one of them. The popularity of an ideology is in part due to the influence of moral entrepreneurs, who sometimes act in their own interests. Political ideologies have two dimensions:Goals: how society should be organized. Methods: the most appropriate way to achieve this goal.An ideology is a collection of ideas. Typically, each ideology contains certain ideas on what it considers to be the best form of government (e.g
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Left-wing Market Anarchism
Left-wing market anarchism, a form of left-libertarianism, individualist anarchism[1] and libertarian socialism,[2][3] is associated with contemporary scholars such as Kevin Carson,[4][5] Roderick T
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Black Anarchism
Black anarchism
Black anarchism
is a loose term sometimes applied in the United States to group together a number of people of African descent who identify with anarchism. They include Ashanti Alston, Lorenzo Kom'boa Ervin, Kuwasi Balagoon, Kai Lumumba Barrow, Greg Jackson, and Martin Sostre. Critics of the term suggest that it elides major political differences between these individuals, incorrectly presenting these individuals as having a shared theory or movement, while imposing a label that these individuals do not (or did not) all accept. The individuals to whom the label has been applied all oppose the existence of the State, the subjugation and domination of black people, and other groups, and favor a non-hierarchical organization of society. In general, these individuals argue for class struggle while stressing the importance of ending racial and national oppression, opposing white supremacy, patriarchy, capitalism, and the state
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Anarcho-capitalism
Anarcho-capitalism
Anarcho-capitalism
is a political philosophy and school of anarchist thought that advocates the elimination of the state in favor of self-ownership, private property, and free markets. Anarcho-capitalists hold that, in the absence of statute (law by centralized decrees and legislation), society tends to contractually self-regulate and civilize through the discipline of the free market (in what its proponents describe as a "voluntary society").[1][2] In an anarcho-capitalist society, law enforcement, courts, and all other security services would be operated by privately funded competitors retained by private property owners rather than centrally through compulsory taxation. Money, along with all other goods and services, would be privately and competitively provided in an open market
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Christian Anarchism
Christian anarchism
Christian anarchism
is a movement in political theology that claims anarchism is inherent in Christianity
Christianity
and the Gospels.[1][2] It is grounded in the belief that there is only one source of authority to which Christians are ultimately answerable—the authority of God as embodied in the teachings of Jesus. It therefore rejects the idea that human governments have ultimate authority over human societies. Christian anarchists denounce the state, believing it is violent, deceitful and, when glorified, idolatrous.[3][4] Christian anarchists hold that the "Reign of God" is the proper expression of the relationship between God and humanity
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Collectivist Anarchism
Collectivist anarchism
Collectivist anarchism
(also known as anarcho-collectivism) is a revolutionary[1] anarchist doctrine that advocates the abolition of both the state and private ownership of the means of production as it instead envisions the means of production being owned collectively and controlled and managed by the producers themselves. For the collectivization of the means of production, it was originally envisaged that workers will revolt and forcibly collectivize the means of production.[1] Once collectivization takes place, money would be abolished to be replaced with labour notes and workers' salaries would be determined in democratic organizations of voluntary membership based on job difficulty and the amount of time they contributed to production
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Egoist Anarchism
Egoist anarchism
Egoist anarchism
is a school of anarchist thought that originated in the philosophy of Max Stirner, a nineteenth-century existentialist philosopher whose "name appears with familiar regularity in historically orientated surveys of anarchist thought as one of the earliest and best-known exponents of individualist anarchism".[1]Contents1 Max Stirner
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Existentialist Anarchism
Some observers believe existentialism forms a philosophical ground for anarchism. Anarchist historian Peter Marshall claims, "there is a close link between the existentialists' stress on the individual, free choice, and moral responsibility and the main tenets of anarchism".[1]Contents1 Background1.1 Max Stirner 1.2 Friedrich Nietzsche 1.3 Other forerunners2 Early and middle 20th century2.1 Kafka and Buber 2.2 Post-war period 2.3 Influence of existentialism3 Contemporary era 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground[edit] See also: Anarchism
Anarchism
and Friedrich Nietzsche, Egoist anarchism, and Philosophy of Max Stirner Max Stirner[edit] Anarchism
Anarchism
had a proto-existentialist view mainly in the writings of German individualist anarchist Max Stirner
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Insurrectionary Anarchism
Insurrectionary anarchism
Insurrectionary anarchism
is a revolutionary theory, practice, and tendency within the anarchist movement that emphasizes insurrection within anarchist practice.[1][2] It is critical of formal organizations such as labor unions and federations that are based on a political programme and periodic congresses.[1] Instead, insurrectionary anarchists advocate informal organization and small affinity group based organization.[1][2] Insurrectionary anarchists put value in attack, permanent class conflict, and a refusal to negotiate or compromise with class enemies.[1
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Left Anarchism
The terms left anarchism and left-wing anarchism distinguish collectivist anarchism from laissez-faire anarchism and right-libertarian philosophies.[1][2] Left anarchists refer to philosophies which posit a future society in which private property is replaced by reciprocity and non-hierarchical society.[3][4] The term "left anarchism" is sometimes used synonymously with libertarian socialism,[5] left-libertarianism or social anarchism.[6] More traditional anarchists typically discourage the concept of "left-wing" theories of anarchism on grounds of redundancy, that it lends legitimacy to the notion that anarchism is compatible with capitalism[7][8] or nationalism.[9][10] Ulrike Heider, a syndicalist, categorized anarchism into left anarchism, right anarchism (anarcho-capitalism) and green anarchism.[11][page needed] See also[edit]Anarcho-capitalism Collectivist anarchism National-Anarchism Post-left anarchy Right-libertarianism Social anarchismReferences[edit]
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Magonism
Magonism[1][2] (Spanish: Magonismo) is an anarchist, or more precisely anarcho-communist,[3][4] school of thought precursor of the Mexican Revolution
Revolution
of 1910. It is mainly based on the ideas of Ricardo Flores Magón,[5] his brothers Enrique and Jesús, and also other collaborators of the Mexican newspaper Regeneración
Regeneración
(organ of the Mexican Liberal Party), as Práxedis Guerrero, Librado Rivera
Librado Rivera
and Anselmo L
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Confederação Geral Do Trabalho
The General Confederation of Labour (Portuguese: Confederação Geral do Trabalho, or CGT) is a former Portuguese labour union confederation. Post-war period[edit] The General Confederation of Labour had its roots in the National Workers' Union (UON) and was founded on 13 September 1919. It was the only Portuguese trade union at the time. It was greatly influenced by the anarcho-syndicalist movement. According to its statutes, its three goals were:the unification of all workers of the country to defend their "economic, social and professional interests, as well as to improve their moral, material and physical condition" to develop the skills within the working class necessary to overthrow capitalism to exercise the concept of mutual helpThe highest decision-making organ in the CGT was the confederation council, a national congress of representatives, which in turn elected seven members that formed the national committee to handle day-to-day matters
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Mutualism (economic Theory)
Mutualism is an economic theory and anarchist school of thought that advocates a society where each person might possess a means of production, either individually or in purely voluntary collectives, with trade representing equivalent amounts of labor in the free market.[1] Integral to the scheme is the establishment of a mutual-credit bank that would lend to producers at a minimal interest rate, just high enough to cover administration.[2] Mutualism is based on a labor theory of value that holds that when labor or its product is sold, in exchange it ought to receive goods or services embodying "the amount of labor necessary to produce an article of exactly similar and equal utility".[3] Mutualism originated from the writings of philosopher Pierre-Joseph Proudhon. Mutualists oppose the idea of individuals receiving an income through loans, investments and rent as they believe these individuals are not laboring
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Anarcho-pacifism
Anarcho-pacifism
Anarcho-pacifism
(also pacifist anarchism or anarchist pacifism) is a tendency within anarchism that rejects the use of violence in the struggle for social change and the abolition of the state.[1][2] The main early influences were the thought of Henry David Thoreau[2] and Leo Tolstoy
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Philosophical Anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
is an anarchist school of thought[1] which holds that the state lacks moral legitimacy while not supporting violence to eliminate it.[2] Though philosophical anarchism does not necessarily imply any action or desire for the elimination of the State, philosophical anarchists do not believe that they have an obligation or duty to obey the State, or conversely, that the State has a right to command. Philosophical anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
is a component especially of individualist anarchism.[3] Scholar Michael Freeden
Michael Freeden
identifies four broad types of individualist anarchism. He says the first is the type associated with William Godwin that advocates self-government with a "progressive rationalism that included benevolence to others." The second type is egoism, most associated with Max Stirner
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