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Father Christmas
Father Christmas
Christmas
is the traditional English name for the personification of Christmas. Although now known as a Christmas gift-bringer, and normally considered to be synonymous with American culture's Santa Claus
Santa Claus
which is now known worldwide, he was originally part of an unrelated and much older English folkloric tradition. The recognisably modern figure of the English Father Christmas
Christmas
developed in the late Victorian period, but Christmas
Christmas
had been personified for centuries before then.[2] English personifications of Christmas
Christmas
were first recorded in the 15th century, with Father Christmas
Christmas
himself first appearing in the mid 17th century in the aftermath of the English Civil War
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Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
FRS (/piːps/ PEEPS;[1] 23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an administrator of the navy of England and Member of Parliament who is most famous for the diary that he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Pepys had no maritime experience, but he rose to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty
Secretary to the Admiralty
under both King Charles II and King James II through patronage, hard work, and his talent for administration. His influence and reforms at the Admiralty
Admiralty
were important in the early professionalisation of the Royal Navy.[2] The detailed private diary that Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration
English Restoration
period
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Shrovetide
Shrovetide, also known as the Pre-Lenten Season, is the Christian period of preparation before the beginning of the liturgical season of Lent.[1][2] Shrovetide starts on Septuagesima Sunday,[1] includes Sexagesima Sunday, Quinquagesima Sunday (commonly called Shrove Sunday),[3] as well as Shrove Monday,[4] and culminates on Shrove Tuesday.[5] One hallmark of Shrovetide is the merrymaking associated with Carnival.[6] On the final day
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Tudor Period
The Tudor period
Tudor period
is the period between 1485 and 1603 in England and Wales and includes the Elizabethan period
Elizabethan period
during the reign of Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I
until 1603. The Tudor period
Tudor period
coincides with the dynasty of the House of Tudor
House of Tudor
in England whose first monarch was Henry VII (1457–1509)
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Stuart Period
The Stuart period
Stuart period
of British history lasted from 1603 to 1714 during the dynasty of the House of Stuart. The period ended with the death of Queen Anne and the accession of King George I from the German House of Hanover. The period was a plague-by internal and religious strife, and a large-scale civil war which resulted in the execution of King Charles I in 1649. The Interregnum, largely under the control of Oliver Cromwell, is included here for continuity, even though the Stuarts were in exile. The Cromwell regime collapsed and Charles II had very wide support for his taking of the throne in 1660. His brother James II was overthrown in 1689 in the Glorious Revolution. He was replaced by his Protestant daughter Mary II and her Dutch husband William III. Mary's sister Anne was the last of the line
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Inn Of Court
The Inns of Court
Inns of Court
in London
London
are the professional associations for barristers in England and Wales. All barristers must belong to one such association.[1][2] They have supervisory and disciplinary functions over their members. The Inns also provide libraries, dining facilities and professional accommodation
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Summer's Last Will And Testament
Summer's Last Will and Testament is an Elizabethan stage play, a comedy written by Thomas Nashe. The play is notable for breaking new ground in the development of English Renaissance drama: "No earlier English comedy has anything like the intellectual content or the social relevance that it has."[1] Although Nashe is known as an Elizabethan playwright, Summer's Last Will and Testament is his only extant solo-authored play; his other surviving dramatic work, Dido, Queen of Carthage, is a collaboration with Christopher Marlowe, in which Nashe's role was probably very minimal.Contents1 Publication 2 Date and performance 3 Genre 4 Modern adaptation 5 References 6 External linksPublication[edit] The play was entered into the Stationers' Register on 28 October 1600, and was published before the end of that year in a quarto printed by Simon Stafford for the bookseller Walter Burre
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Thomas Nashe
Thomas Nashe
Thomas Nashe
(baptised November 1567 – c. 1601) is considered the greatest of the English Elizabethan
Elizabethan
pamphleteers.[2]:5 He was a playwright, poet, and satirist. He is best known for his novel The Unfortunate Traveller[3] and his numerous defences of the Church of England.[4]Contents1 Early life 2 In London, Marprelate controversy 3 Erotica 4 Feud with the Harvey brothers 5 Major works 6 Chronology of Nashe's works 7 The Anne Forest Novels 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Thomas Nashe
Thomas Nashe
was the son of the parson William Nashe and Margaret (née Witchingham). He was born and baptised in Lowestoft, on the coast of Suffolk, where his father, William Nashe, or Nayshe as it is recorded, was curate
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Ben Jonson
Benjamin Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637[2]) was an English playwright, poet, actor, and literary critic, whose artistry exerted a lasting impact upon English poetry and stage comedy. He popularised the comedy of humours. He is best known for the satirical plays Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone, or The Fox (c
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Protestantism
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Masque
The masque was a form of festive courtly entertainment that flourished in 16th- and early 17th-century Europe, though it was developed earlier in Italy, in forms including the intermedio (a public version of the masque was the pageant). A masque involved music and dancing, singing and acting, within an elaborate stage design, in which the architectural framing and costumes might be designed by a renowned architect, to present a deferential allegory flattering to the patron. Professional actors and musicians were hired for the speaking and singing parts. Often the masquers, who did not speak or sing, were courtiers: the English queen Anne of Denmark
Anne of Denmark
frequently danced with her ladies in masques between 1603 and 1611, and Henry VIII and Charles I of England
Charles I of England
performed in the masques at their courts
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Thomas Nabbes
Thomas Nabbes (1605 – 6 April 1641) was an English dramatist. He was born in humble circumstances in Worcestershire, and educated at Exeter College, Oxford
Exeter College, Oxford
in 1621. He left the university without taking a degree, and in about 1630 began a career in London
London
as a dramatist. He was employed at some point in the household of a nobleman near Worcester, and seems to have been of a convivial disposition.[1] He had at least two children, Bridget and William, both of whom died within two years of his death, and were buried with him at St Giles in the Fields.[2]Contents1 Burial 2 Works 3 The Unfortunate Mother 4 Selected works 5 ReferencesBurial[edit] For centuries there was uncertainty about Nabbes' fate and burial
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Puritanism
The Puritans
Puritans
were English Reformed
Reformed
Protestants
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Thomas The Apostle
Thomas the Apostle
Thomas the Apostle
(Biblical Hebrew: תומאס הקדוש‎, Coptic: ⲑⲱⲙⲁⲥ, Classical Syriac: ܬܐܘܡܐ ܫܠܝܚܐ‎ Mar Thoma; also called Didymus which means "the twin") was one of the Twelve Apostles
Apostles
of Jesus, according to the New Testament. He is informally ca
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English Reformation
The English Reformation
Reformation
was a series of events in 16th century England by which the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church. These events were, in part, associated with the wider process of the European Protestant Reformation, a religious and political movement that affected the practice of Christianity
Christianity
across western and central Europe during this period. Many factors contributed to the process: the decline of feudalism and the rise of nationalism, the rise of the common law, the invention of the printing press and increased circulation of the Bible, and the transmission of new knowledge and ideas among scholars, the upper and middle classes and readers in general
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Interregnum (1649–1660)
The "interregnum" in England, Scotland, and Ireland started with the execution of Charles I in January 1649 (September 1651 in Scotland) and ended in May 1660 when his son Charles II was restored to the thrones of the three realms, although he had been already acclaimed king in Scotland since 1650. The precise start and end of the interregnum, as well as the social and political events that occurred during the interregnum, varied in the three kingdoms and the English dominions.Contents1 Prelude 2 England 3 Ireland 4 Scotland 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesPrelude[edit] After the Second English Civil War
Second English Civil War
the leadership of the New Model Army felt deeply betrayed by the King because they thought that while they had been negotiating in good faith he had duplicitously gone behind their backs in making The Engagement with the Scots and encouraging a new civil war
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