HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Fargo, North Dakota
Fargo is the most populous city in the state of North Dakota, accounting for nearly 16% of the state population.[5] Fargo is also the county seat of Cass County
[...More...]

picture info

City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
[...More...]

picture info

Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn.[1] In effect, DST causes a lost hour of sleep in the spring and an extra hour of sleep in the fall.[2][3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
[...More...]

picture info

Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
[...More...]

picture info

Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
& Company is an American multinational financial services company headquartered in San Francisco, California, with central offices throughout the country.[3] It is the world's second-largest bank by market capitalization[4] and the third largest bank in the U.S. by total assets.[5] In July 2015, Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
became the world's largest bank by market capitalization, edging past ICBC,[5] before slipping behind JPMorgan Chase
JPMorgan Chase
in September 2016, in the wake of a scandal involving the creation of over 2 million fake bank accounts by Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
employees.[4] Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
surpassed Citigroup
Citigroup
Inc. to become the third-largest U.S. bank by assets at the end of 2015
[...More...]

picture info

Steamboat
A steamboat is a boat that is propelled primarily by steam power, typically driving propellers or paddlewheels. Steamboats sometimes use the prefix designation SS, S.S. or S/S (for 'Screw Steamer') or PS (for 'Paddle Steamer'), however these designations are most often used for steamships. The term steamboat is used to refer to smaller, insular, steam-powered boats working on lakes and rivers, particularly riverboats
[...More...]

picture info

Dakota People
The Dakota people
Dakota people
are a Native American tribe and First Nations
First Nations
band government in North America. They compose two of the three main subcultures of the Sioux
Sioux
/ˈsuː/ people, and are typically divided into the Eastern Dakota and the Western Dakota. The Eastern Dakota are the Santee (Isáŋyathi or Isáŋ-athi; "knife" + "encampment", ″dwells at the place of knife flint″), who reside in the eastern Dakotas, central Minnesota
Minnesota
and northern Iowa. They have federally recognized tribes established in several places. The Western Dakota are the Yankton, and the Yanktonai (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), who reside in the Upper Missouri River area. The Yankton-Yanktonai are collectively also referred to by the endonym Wičhíyena (″Those Who Speak Like Men″)
[...More...]

picture info

Sioux
The Sioux
Sioux
/suː/ also known as Lakota, are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations
First Nations
peoples in North America. The term can refer to any ethnic group within the Great Sioux Nation
Great Sioux Nation
or to any of the nation's many language dialects. The Sioux
Sioux
comprise three major divisions based on language divisions: the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota. The Santee Dakota (Isáŋyathi; "Knife") reside in the extreme east of the Dakotas, Minnesota
Minnesota
and northern Iowa. The Yankton and Yanktonai Dakota (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), collectively also referred to by the endonym Wičhíyena, reside in the Minnesota River area
[...More...]

picture info

Floodplain
A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river which stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls and which experiences flooding during periods of high discharge.[1] The soils usually consist of levees, silts, and sands deposited during floods. Levees are the heaviest materials (usually pebble-size) and they are deposited first; silts and sands are finer materials.Contents1 Formation 2 Ecology 3 Interaction with society 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksFormation[edit] Floodplains are made by a meander eroding sideways as it travels downstream. When a river breaks its banks, it leaves behind layers of alluvium (silt). These gradually build up to create the floor of the plain. Floodplains generally contain unconsolidated sediments, often extending below the bed of the stream
[...More...]

picture info

Forbes
Forbes
Forbes
(/fɔːrbz/) is an American business magazine. Published bi-weekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes
Forbes
also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, politics, and law. Its headquarters is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category include Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists and rankings, including of the richest Americans (the Forbes
Forbes
400), of the world's top companies (the Forbes
Forbes
Global 2000), and The World's Billionaires
[...More...]

picture info

County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
[...More...]

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
[...More...]

picture info

Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
[...More...]

Federal Information Processing Standard
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to es
[...More...]

picture info

North American Numbering Plan
The North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
(NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses 25 distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean
Caribbean
and the U.S. territories. Not all North American countries participate in the NANP. The NANP was originally devised in the 1940s by AT&T for the Bell System and independent telephone operators in North America, to unify the diverse local numbering plans that had been established in the preceding decades. AT&T continued to administer the numbering plan until the breakup of the Bell System
Bell System
when administration was delegated to the North American Numbering Plan
North American Numbering Plan
Administration (NANPA), a service that has been procured from the private sector by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States
[...More...]

picture info

ZIP Code
ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan;[1] it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S
[...More...]

.