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Fare Evasion
Fare
Fare
evasion or ticket evasion, as distinct from fare avoidance or ticket avoidance, is the act of travelling on public transport in disregard of the law and/or regulation, having deliberately not purchased the required ticket to travel (having had the chance to do so). It is a problem in many parts of the world, and revenue protection officers operate on many systems. Often ticket barriers, manned or automatic, are in place at stations etc., to ensure only those with valid tickets may access the transport. Fare
Fare
evasion and fare fraud is generally a crime in most jurisdictions.[citation needed] The fare not paid, compared to potential penalties and hassle, is generally considered “not worth it”.[1][2] Fare
Fare
evasion can be a chronic problem in transit systems, especially large cities like New York[1] or Paris
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Stowaway
A stowaway is a person who secretly boards a vehicle, such as a ship, an aircraft, a train, cargo truck or bus, in order to travel without paying and without being detected.Contents1 Air travel1.1 Security2 Rail transportation 3 Ship
Ship
travel3.1 Origin 3.2 In United States 3.3 From 18434 See also 5 References 6 External linksAir travel[edit] Further information: List of wheel-well stowaway flights Poor perimeter security at a number of airports around the world can make it easier for people to stow away on planes.[1] Stowaways in aircraft wheel wells face numerous health risks, many of which are
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Security Guard
A security guard (also known as a security officer or protective agent) is a person employed by a public or private party to protect the employing party’s assets (property, people, equipment, money, etc.) from a variety of hazards (such as waste, damaged property, unsafe worker behavior, criminal activity such as theft, etc.) by enforcing preventative measures
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Madrid
Madrid
Madrid
(/məˈdrɪd/, Spanish: [maˈðɾið], locally [maˈðɾi(θ)]) is the capital of Spain
Spain
and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid
Community of Madrid
and Spain
Spain
as a whole. The city has almost 3.166 million[4] inhabitants with a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Moscow
Moscow
Moscow
(/ˈmɒskoʊ, -kaʊ/; Russian: Москва́, tr. Moskva, IPA: [mɐˈskva] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 12.2 million residents within the city limits[11] and 17.1 million within the urban area.[12] Moscow
Moscow
is recognized as a Russian federal city. Moscow
Moscow
is a major political, economic, cultural, and scientific centre of Russia
Russia
and Eastern Europe, as well as the largest city entirely on the European continent. By broader definitions Moscow
Moscow
is among the world's largest cities, being the 14th largest metro area, the 18th largest agglomeration, the 15th largest urban area, and the 11th largest by population within city limits worldwide
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Emergency Exit
An emergency exit in a structure is a special exit for emergencies such as a fire: the combined use of regular and special exits allows for faster evacuation, while it also provides an alternative if the route to the regular exit is blocked by fire, etc. The qualifications for an emergency exit are as follows: it must be in a location that is easily accessible, the exit must have an area or location that it can bring you to in the event of any emergency situation, it must be controlled by the inside of the building, it must be well managed and regularly up kept, and it must be in a permanent location. It is usually in a strategically located (e.g. in a stairwell, hallway, or other likely places) outward opening door with a crash bar on it and with exit signs leading to it
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New York City Subway
October 27, 1904 (Original subway) July 3, 1868[6] (first elevated, rapid transit operation) October 9, 1863 (first railroad operation)[note 6]Operator(s) New York City
New York City
Transit Authority (NYCTA)Number of vehicles 6,418[7]Headway Peak hours: 2–5 minutes[8] Off-peak: 10–20 minutes[8]TechnicalSystem length 7005394289280000000♠245 miles (394 km)[9]      (route length) 691 mi (1,112 km)[9]      (track length, revenue) 850 mi (1,370 km)[10]      (track length, total)Track gauge 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gau
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Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Transportation Authority (abbreviated MBTA and known colloquially as "the T")[8][9] is the public agency responsible for operating most public transportation services in Greater Boston, Massachusetts. Earlier modes of public transportation in Boston
Boston
were independently owned and operated; many were first folded into a single agency with the formation of the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) in 1947. The MTA was replaced in 1964 with the present-day MBTA, which was established as an individual department within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
before becoming a division of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) in 2009. The MBTA and Philadelphia's Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) are the only U.S
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Closed-circuit Television
Closed-circuit television
Closed-circuit television
(CCTV), also known as video surveillance,[1][2] is the use of video cameras to transmit a signal to a specific place, on a limited set of monitors. It differs from broadcast television in that the signal is not openly transmitted, though it may employ point to point (P2P), point to multipoint (P2MP), or mesh wired or wireless links. Though almost all video cameras fit this definition, the term is most often applied to those used for surveillance in areas that may need monitoring such as banks, stores, and other areas where security is needed. Though Videotelephony
Videotelephony
is seldom called "CCTV" one exception is the use of video in distance education, where it is an important tool.[3][4] Surveillance
Surveillance
of the public using CCTV is common in many areas around the world
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Vandalism
Vandalism
Vandalism
is "action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property."[1] The term includes property damage, such as graffiti and defacement directed towards any property without permission of the owner. The term finds its roots in an Enlightenment view that the Germanic Vandals
Vandals
were a uniquely destructive people.Contents1 Etymology 2 As a crime2.1 Examples 2.2 Political 2.3 Motives 2.4 Reaction of authorities 2.5 Cybervandalism3 Defacement 4 As art4.1 Graphic design5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External links 10 See alsoEtymologyThe Vandals
Vandals
sacking RomeThe Vandals, an ancient Germanic people, are associated with senseless destruction as a result of their sack of Rome under King Genseric
Genseric
in 455
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Fine (penalty)
A fine or mulct is money that a court of law or other authority decides has to be paid as punishment for a crime or other offence. The amount of a fine can be determined case by case, but it is often announced in advance.[1]A warning sign in Singapore that states the fine for releasing vehicles that are immobilized with wheel clamps by Singapore Police Force officers.The most usual use of the term is for financial punishments for the commission of crimes, especially minor crimes, or as the settlement of a claim. A synonym, typically used in civil law actions, is mulct. One common example of a fine is money paid for violations of traffic laws. Currently in English common law, relatively small fines are used either in place of or alongside community service orders for low-level criminal offences
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SAPSAN
The Sapsan
Sapsan
(Russian: Сапсан, lit. 'Peregrine Falcon', known as Velaro RUS EVS) is a Russian gauge
Russian gauge
high speed electric express train
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Prosecution
The prosecutor is the chief legal representative of the prosecution in countries with either the common law adversarial system, or the civil law inquisitorial system. The prosecution is the legal party responsible for presenting the case in a criminal trial against an individual accused of breaking the law
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Conviction
In law, a conviction is the verdict that usually results when a court of law finds a defendant guilty of a crime.[1] The opposite of a conviction is an acquittal (i.e. "not guilty"). In Scotland
Scotland
and in the Netherlands, there can also be a verdict of "not proven", which counts as an acquittal. There are also cases where the court orders that a defendant not be convicted, despite being found guilty; in England, Wales, Canada, Australia
Australia
and New Zealand the mechanism for this is a discharge. For a host of reasons, the criminal justice system is not perfect, and sometimes guilty defendants are acquitted, while innocent people are convicted. Appeal
Appeal
mechanisms and post conviction relief procedures may mitigate the effects of a conviction to some extent
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Misdemeanor
A misdemeanor (American English,[1] spelled misdemeanour in British English) is any "lesser" criminal act in some common law legal systems. Misdemeanors are generally punished less severely than felonies, but theoretically more so than administrative infractions (also known as minor, petty, or summary offences) and regulatory offences
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