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Faramir
In J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth
Middle-earth
legendarium, Faramir
Faramir
is a fictional character appearing in The Lord of the Rings. He is introduced as the younger brother of Boromir
Boromir
of the Fellowship of the Ring and second son of Denethor
Denethor
II, the Steward of the realm of Gondor. The relationships between the three men are revealed over the course of the book and are elaborated in the appendices. Faramir
Faramir
first enters the narrative in person in The Two Towers, where, upon meeting Frodo Baggins, he is presented with a temptation to take possession of the One Ring
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Third Age
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the history of the fictional universe of began when the Ainur entered Arda, following the creation events in the Ainulindalë
Ainulindalë
and long ages of labour throughout Eä, the universe. Time from that point was measured using Valian Years, though the subsequent history of Arda was divided into three time periods using different years, known as the Years of the Lamps, the Years of the Trees and the Years of the Sun. A separate, overlapping chronology divides the history into 'Ages of the Children of Ilúvatar'. The first such Age began with the Awakening of the Elves during the Years of the Trees and continued for the first six centuries of the Years of the Sun. All the subsequent Ages took place during the Years of the Sun
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Dénouement
Dramatic structure
Dramatic structure
is the structure of a dramatic work such as a play or film. Many scholars have analyzed dramatic structure, beginning with Aristotle
Aristotle
in his Poetics (c. 335 BCE). This article looks at Aristotle's analysis of the Greek tragedy and on Gustav Freytag's analysis of ancient Greek and Shakespearean drama.Contents1 History 2 Aristotle's analysis 3 Freytag's analysis3.1 Exposition 3.2 Rising action 3.3 Climax 3.4 Falling action 3.5 Dénouement4 Criticism 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In his Poetics, the Greek philosopher Aristotle
Aristotle
put forth the idea the play should imitate a single whole action
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Wizard (Middle-earth)
In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
are a group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power
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Isildur
Isildur is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He appears in the author's books The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales. In The Lord of the Rings, he was first mentioned in The Fellowship of the Ring as a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. A more complete history appears in The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
and Unfinished Tales. He was the second king of Gondor
Gondor
(jointly with his brother Anárion until the latter's death) and the second king of Arnor. He cut the One Ring from Sauron's hand, and was its bearer until he was killed by orcs. His name means "devoted to the moon"
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Mordor
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional world of Middle-earth, Mordor (pronounced [ˈmɔrdɔr]; from Sindarin
Sindarin
Black Land and Quenya
Quenya
Land of Shadow) was the region occupied and controlled by Sauron, in the southeast of northwestern Middle-earth
Middle-earth
to the East of Anduin, the great river. Orodruin, a volcano in Mordor, was the goal of the Fellowship of the Ring (and later Frodo Baggins
Frodo Baggins
and Sam Gamgee) in the quest to destroy the One Ring. Mordor has three enormous mountain ranges surrounding it, from the north, from the west and from the south
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One Ring
The One Ring
One Ring
is an artefact that appears as the central plot element in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Lord of the Rings
(1954–55). It is described in an earlier story, The Hobbit
The Hobbit
(1937), as a magic ring of invisibility. In the sequel, The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
Tolkien
ascribes to the Ring a darker character, with malevolent power going far beyond conferring invisibility: it was created by Sauron
Sauron
the Dark Lord as part of his design to win domination over Middle-earth
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River Anduin
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth, Anduin
Anduin
is the Sindarin name for the Great River
River
of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin
Sindarin
name means Long River). The ancestors of the Rohirrim called it Langflood. It flowed from its sources in the Grey and Misty Mountains
Misty Mountains
to the Mouths of Anduin
Anduin
(Ethir Anduin) in the Great Sea (Belegaer)
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Narsil
Weapons and armour of Middle-earth are found in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings, such as The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. Wars and battles are featured in much of Tolkien's writings, and weapons and armour are often given special attention.[1][2] Tolkien modelled his fictional warfare on the Ancient and Early Middle periods of history. His depiction of weapons and armour particularly reflect the Northern European culture of Beowulf, the Norse sagas and similar works. Tolkien established this relationship in The Fall of Gondolin, the first story in his legendarium to be written. In this story, the Elves of Gondolin use mail armour, swords, shields, spears, axes and bows, which is consistent with Northern European warfare
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Rivendell
Rivendell
Rivendell
is an Elven realm in Middle-earth, a fictional world created by J. R. R. Tolkien. It is an important location in Tolkien's legendarium, and is featured in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales. It was established and ruled by Elrond
Elrond
Half-elven in the Second Age of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
(four or five thousand years before the events of The Lord of the Rings), and was protected by the powers of its lord and his elven ring Vilya. Elrond
Elrond
lived in Rivendell
Rivendell
with his family—his wife Celebrían (until she departed for Valinor), their sons Elladan and Elrohir, and their daughter Arwen—as well as a sizeable number of other Elves, both Noldor and Sindar
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Half-elven
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Half-elven ( Sindarin
Sindarin
singular Peredhel, plural Peredhil, Quenya singular Perelda) are the children of the union of Elves and Men. Of these, the most significant were the products of couplings between the Eldar (the Elves who followed the Call to Valinor) and the Edain (the Men of the Three Houses of early Men who allied themselves with the Eldar in their war against Morgoth). There were three recorded unions of the Edain and Eldar that generated descendants: They were Idril
Idril
and Tuor, Lúthien
Lúthien
and Beren, Arwen and Aragorn. The first two couples wed during the final part of the First Age of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
while the third married at the end of the Third Age (some six thousand-five hundred years later)
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Fictional Character
A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game).[1][2][3] The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made.[2] Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration,[4] although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749.[5][6] From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed.[6] Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person."[7] In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes.[8] Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor.[6] Since the 19th century, the art of creating cha
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Hobbits
Hobbits[1] are a fictional, diminutive, humanoid race who inhabit the lands of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fiction. They are also referred to as Halflings. Hobbits first appeared in the novel The Hobbit, whose titular hobbit is the protagonist Bilbo Baggins. The novel The Lord of the Rings includes as major characters the hobbits Frodo Baggins, Samwise Gamgee, Peregrin Took, and Meriadoc Brandybuck, as well as several other minor hobbit characters. Hobbits are also briefly mentioned in The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
and Unfinished Tales. According to the author in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings, hobbits are "relatives"[2] of the race of Men. Elsewhere, Tolkien describes Hobbits as a "variety"[3] or separate "branch"[4] of humans. Within the story, hobbits and other races seem aware of the similarities (hence the colloquial terms "Big People" and "Little People" used in Bree)
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Man (Middle-earth)
A man is a male human. The term man is usually reserved for an adult male, with the term boy being the usual term for a male child or adolescent. However, the term man is also sometimes used to identify a male human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as "men's basketball". Like most other male mammals, a man's genome typically inherits an X chromosome from his mother and a Y chromosome from his father. The male fetus produces larger amounts of androgens and smaller amounts of estrogens than a female fetus. This difference in the relative amounts of these sex steroids is largely responsible for the physiological differences that distinguish men from women. During puberty, hormones which stimulate androgen production result in the development of secondary sexual characteristics, thus exhibiting greater differences between the sexes
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Anduin
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth, Anduin
Anduin
is the Sindarin name for the Great River
River
of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin
Sindarin
name means Long River). The ancestors of the Rohirrim called it Langflood. It flowed from its sources in the Grey and Misty Mountains
Misty Mountains
to the Mouths of Anduin
Anduin
(Ethir Anduin) in the Great Sea (Belegaer)
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Orc (Middle-earth)
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy writings, Orcs are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings—Morgoth, Sauron
Sauron
and Saruman. Although not entirely dim-witted and occasionally crafty, they are portrayed as miserable beings, hating everyone including themselves and their masters, whom they serve out of fear. They make no beautiful things, but rather design cunning devices made to hurt and destroy. In some of his unpublished early work, Tolkien
Tolkien
appears to distinguish orcs from goblins. By the time of his published work, however, the terms had become synonymous. The Hobbit generally uses the term goblin, while The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
prefers orc
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