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Fairy Tales
A fairy tale, wonder tale, magic tale, or Märchen is folklore genre that takes the form of a short story that typically features entities such as dwarfs, dragons, elves, fairies, giants, gnomes, goblins, griffins, mermaids, talking animals, trolls, unicorns, or witches, and usually magic or enchantments. Fairy
Fairy
tales may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described)[1] and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables. The term is mainly used for stories with origins in European tradition and, at least in recent centuries, mostly relates to children's literature. In less technical contexts, the term is also used to describe something blessed with unusual happiness, as in "fairy tale ending" (a happy ending)[2] or "fairy tale romance"
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Fairy Tale (other)
A fairy tale is a story featuring folkloric characters. Fairy Tale(s) or Fairytale(s) may also refer to:Contents1 Art, entertainment, and media1.1 Dance 1.2 Films 1.3 Games 1.4 Literature and manga 1.5 Music1.5.1 Albums 1.5.2 Songs1.6 Television2 Other uses 3 See alsoArt, entertainment, and media[edit] Dance[edit]A Fairy Tale, a ballet by Marius Petipa and RichterFilms[edit]Fairy Tales (film), a 1978 sex comedy FairyTale: A True Story, a 1997 film based on the story of the Cottingley FairiesGames[edit]Fairy Tale (game), a card game A Fairy Tale (video game), a 2009 puzzle video game created by Reflexive Entertainment The Faery Tale Adventure, a 1987 adventure video gameLiterature and manga[edit]Faerie Tale, a 1988 fantasy novel by Raymond E. Feist Fairy Tail, a 2006 manga by Hiro Mashima Fairy Tales (Cummings book), a book of fairy tales by e.e
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Vladimir Propp
Vladimir Yakovlevich Propp (Russian: Владимир Яковлевич Пропп; 29 April [O.S. 17 April] 1895 – 22 August 1970) was a Soviet folklorist and scholar who analyzed the basic plot components of Russian folk tales to identify their simplest irreducible narrative elements.Contents1 Biography 2 Works in Russian 3 Translations into English and other languages 4 Narrative structure4.1 Functions 4.2 Characters5 Criticism 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Vladimir Propp
Vladimir Propp
was born on 17 April 1895 in Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
to a German family
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Epic Poems
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] Milman Parry
Milman Parry
and Albert Lord have argued that the Homeric epics, the earliest works of Western literature, were fundamentally an oral poetic form. These works form the basis of the epic genre in Western literature. Nearly all of Western epic (including Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneid
and Dante's Divine Comedy) self-consciously presents itself as a continuation of the tradition begun by these poems. Classical epic poetry employs a meter called dactylic hexameter and recounts a journey, either physical (as typified by Odysseus in the Odyssey) or mental (as typified by Achilles in the Iliad) or both
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Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Once Upon A Time
"Once upon a time" is a stock phrase used to introduce a narrative of past events, typically in fairy tales and folk tales. It has been used in some form since at least 1380 (according to the Oxford English Dictionary) in storytelling in the English language
English language
and has opened many oral narratives since 1600. These stories often then end with "and they all lived happily ever after", or, originally, "happily until their deaths". The phrase is particularly common in fairy tales for younger children, where it is almost always the opening line of a tale
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Madame D'Aulnoy
Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, Baroness d'Aulnoy (1650/1651–4 January 1705), also known as Countess d'Aulnoy, was a French writer known for her fairy tales. When she termed her works contes de fées (fairy tales), she originated the term that is now generally used for the genre.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Issue 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links and resourcesBiography[edit] D'Aulnoy was born in Barneville-la-Bertran, Calvados, as a member of the noble family of Le Jumel de Barneville.[2] In 1666, she was given at the age of fifteen (by her father) in an arranged marriage to a Parisian thirty years older—François de la Motte, Baron d'Aulnoy, of the household of the Duke of Vendôme. The baron was a freethinker and a known gambler. In 1669, the Baron d'Aulnoy was accused of treason (speaking out against imposed taxes by the King) by two men who may have been the lovers of Mme d'Aulnoy (aged nineteen) and her mother, The Marchioness de Gadagne ([3])
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Durham University
Durham University
Durham University
(legally the University of Durham)[4] is a collegiate public research university in Durham, North East England, with a second campus in Stockton-on-Tees. The chancellor of the university is Sir Thomas Allen, who succeeded Bill Bryson
Bill Bryson
in 2012.[5] As a collegiate university its main functions are divided between the academic departments of the university and 16 colleges. In general, the departments perform research and provide lectures to students, while the colleges are responsible for the domestic arrangements and welfare of undergraduate students, graduate students, post-doctoral researchers and some university staff. The university was founded by an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
in 1832 and granted a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1837
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Universidade Nova De Lisboa
The Universiade
Universiade
is an international multi-sport event, organized for university athletes by the International University
University
Sports Federation (FISU). The name is a combination of the words "University" and "olympiad". The Universiade
Universiade
is often referred to in English as the World University
University
Games or World Student Games; however, this latter term can also refer to competitions for sub- University
University
grades students.[citation needed] The Universiade
Universiade
is the largest[vague] multi-sport event in the world apart from the Olympic Games.[1]
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Aarne-Thompson Classification System
The Aarne–Thompson classification systems are indices used to classify folktales: the Aarne–Thompson Motif-Index (catalogued by alphabetical letters followed by numerals), the Aarne–Thompson Tale Type Index (cataloged by AT or AaTh numbers), and the Aarne–Thompson–Uther classification system (developed in 2004 and cataloged by ATU numbers)
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Happy Ending
A happy ending is an ending of the plot of a work of fiction in which almost everything turns out for the best for the protagonists, their sidekicks, and almost everyone except the villains. In storylines where the protagonists are in physical danger, a happy ending mainly consists of their survival and successful completion of the quest or mission; where there is no physical danger, a happy ending may be lovers consummating their love despite various factors which may have thwarted it. A considerable number of storylines combine both situations. In Steven Spielberg's version of "War of the Worlds", the happy ending consists of three distinct elements: The protagonists all survive the countless perils of their journey; humanity as a whole survives the alien invasion; and the protagonist father regains the respect of his estranged children
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Motif (literature)
In narrative, a motif  (pronunciation) (help·info) is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story. Through its repetition, a motif can help produce other narrative (or literary) aspects such as theme or mood.[1][2] A narrative motif can be created through the use of imagery, structural components, language, and other narrative elements. The flute in Arthur Miller's play Death of a Salesman
Death of a Salesman
is a recurrent sound motif that conveys rural and idyllic notions. Another example from modern American literature
American literature
is the green light found in the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Narratives may include multiple motifs of varying types. In Shakespeare's play Macbeth, he uses a variety of narrative elements to create many different motifs. Imagistic references to blood and water are continually repeated
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Hero
A hero (masculine) or heroine (feminine) is a person or main character of a literary work who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through feats of ingenuity, bravery or strength, often sacrificing their own personal concerns for a greater good. The concept of the hero can be found in classical literature. It is the main or revered character in heroic epic poetry celebrated through ancient legends of a people, often striving for military conquest and living by a continually flawed personal honor code.[1] The definition of a hero has changed throughout time
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Prince
A prince is a male ruler or member of a monarch's or former monarch's family. Prince
Prince
is also a title of nobility, often hereditary, in some European states. The feminine equivalent is a princess
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Dragon
A dragon is a large, serpent-like legendary creature that appears in the folklore of many cultures around world. Beliefs about dragons vary drastically by region, but dragons in western cultures since the High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
have often been depicted as winged, horned, four-legged, and capable of breathing fire. Dragons
Dragons
in eastern cultures are usually depicted as wingless, four-legged, serpentine creatures with above-average intelligence. The earliest attested dragons resemble giant snakes. Dragon-like creatures are first described in the mythologies of the ancient Near East and appear in ancient Mesopotamian art and literature. Stories about storm-gods slaying giant serpents occur throughout nearly all Indo-European and Near Eastern mythologies
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