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Fagin
Fagin
Fagin
/ˈfeɪɡɪn/ is a fictional character in Charles Dickens's novel Oliver Twist. In the preface to the novel, he is described as a "receiver of stolen goods". He is the leader of a group of children (the Artful Dodger
Artful Dodger
and Charley Bates
Charley Bates
among them) whom he teaches to make their livings by pickpocketing and other criminal activities, in exchange for shelter. A distinguishing trait is his constant - and insincere - use of the phrase "my dear" when addressing others. At the time of the novel, he is said by another character, Monks, to have already made criminals out of "scores" of children. Nancy, who is the lover of Bill Sikes, one of the novel's major villains, is confirmed to be Fagin's former pupil. Fagin
Fagin
is a self-confessed miser who, despite the wealth he has acquired, does very little to improve the squalid lives of the children he guards, or his own
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Norman Lebrecht
Norman Lebrecht (born 11 July 1948 in London) is a British commentator on music and cultural affairs, a novelist, and the author of the classical music blog Slipped Disc.[1] He was a columnist for The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph
from 1994 to 2002, and assistant editor of the London Evening Standard
London Evening Standard
from 2002 to 2009. On BBC Radio 3, Lebrecht presented lebrecht.live beginning in 2000, and The Lebrecht Interview from 2006 to 2016. He won the 2002 Whitbread Award for First Novel for The Song of Names, at the age of 54. He also writes a column for the magazine Standpoint
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Fictional Character
A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game).[1][2][3] The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made.[2] Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration,[4] although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749.[5][6] From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed.[6] Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person."[7] In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes.[8] Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor.[6] Since the 19th century, the art of creating cha
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Antisemitism
Antisemitism
Antisemitism
(also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.[1][2][3] A person who holds such positions is called an antisemite. Antisemitism is generally considered to be a form of racism.[4][5] Antisemitism
Antisemitism
may be manifested in many ways, ranging from expressions of hatred of or discrimination against individual Jews
Jews
to organized pogroms by mobs, state police, or even military attacks on entire Jewish communities. Although the term did not come into common usage until the 19th century, it is now also applied to historic anti-Jewish incidents
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Comic Book
A comic book or comicbook,[1] also called comic magazine or simply comic, is a publication that consists of comic art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form
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Seville
Seville
Seville
(/səˈvɪl/; Spanish: Sevilla [seˈβiʎa], locally [seˈβi(ɟ)ʝa] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of the autonomous community of Andalusia
Andalusia
and the province of Seville, Spain. It is situated on the plain of the river Guadalquivir. The inhabitants of the city are known as sevillanos (feminine form: sevillanas) or hispalenses, after the Roman name of the city, Hispalis. Seville
Seville
has a municipal population of about 703,000 as of 2011[update], and a metropolitan population of about 1.5 million, making it the fourth-largest city in Spain
Spain
and the 30th most populous municipality in the European Union. Its Old Town, with an area of 4 square kilometres (2 sq mi), contains three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Alcázar palace complex, the Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies
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Rinconete Y Cortadillo
Rinconete y Cortadillo
Rinconete y Cortadillo
(or Novela de Rinconete y Cortadillo)[1] is one of the twelve short stories included in Novelas Ejemplares, by Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes. The story is set in Seville
Seville
in 1569, which at the time was a rich city with marked social contrasts, because it was the hub of Spanish trade with America.[2] References[edit]^ "Novela de Rinconete y Cortadillo" (in Spanish). Universidad de Alcalá. Retrieved 20 January 2013.  ^ Bel Bravo, María Antonia (1996) [1993]. "El mundo social de Rinconete y Cortadillo" [The Social World of Rinconete y Cortadillo] (PDF). In Arellano, Ignacio. Studia Aurea. Actas del III Congreso de la AISO III (pdf) (in Spanish). 3: Prosa. Toulouse-Pamplona: GRISO-LEMSO. pp. 45–53 [47]. ISBN 9788492158133
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Miguel De Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Saavedra[b] (/sərˈvæntiːz/;[3] Spanish: [miˈɣel de θerˈβantes saaˈβeðɾa]; 29 September 1547 (assumed) – 23 April 1616 N.S.)[4] was a Spanish writer who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the Spanish language and one of the world's pre-eminent novelists. His masterpiece Don Quixote has been translated into more languages than any other book except the Bible. His major work, Don Quixote, sometimes considered the first modern novel,[5] is a classic of Western literature, regarded among the best works of fiction ever written.[6] His influence on the Spanish language has been so great that the language is often called la lengua de Cervantes ("the language of Cervantes").[7] He has also been dubbed El príncipe de los ingenios ("The Prince of Wits").[8] In 1569, in forced exile from Castile, Cervantes moved to Rome, where he worked as chamber assistant of a cardinal
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Underworld
The underworld or netherworld is an otherworld thought to be deep underground or beneath the surface of the world in most religions and mythologies.[1] Typically, it is a place where the souls of the departed go, an afterlife or a realm of the dead
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Graphic Novel
A graphic novel is a book made up of comics content. Although the word "novel" normally refers to long fictional works, the term "graphic novel" is applied broadly and includes fiction, non-fiction, and anthologized work
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Back Story
A backstory, background story, back-story, or background is a set of events invented for a plot, presented as preceding and leading up to that plot. It is a literary device of a narrative history all chronologically earlier than the narrative of primary interest. It is the history of characters and other elements that underlie the situation existing at the main narrative's start. Even a purely historical work selectively reveals backstory to the audience.[1][2]Contents1 Usage 2 Recollection 3 Shared universe 4 See also 5 ReferencesUsage[edit] As a literary device backstory is often employed to lend depth or believability to the main story. The usefulness of having a dramatic revelation was recognized by Aristotle, in Poetics. Backstories are usually revealed, partially or in full, chronologically or otherwise, as the main narrative unfolds
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Anti-Defamation League
The Anti-Defamation League
Anti-Defamation League
(ADL; formerly known as the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith) is an international Jewish non-governmental organization based in the United States
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B'nai B'rith
B'nai B'rith
B'nai B'rith
International (English: /bəˌneɪ ˈbrɪθ/, from Hebrew: בני ברית‬ b'né brit, "Children of the Covenant")[1] is the oldest Jewish service organization in the world. B'nai B'rith states that it is committed to the security and continuity of the Jewish people and the State of Israel
Israel
and combating antisemitism and bigotry
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Irving Howe
Irving Howe
Irving Howe
(/haʊ/; June 11, 1920 – May 5, 1993) was a Jewish American literary and social critic and a prominent figure of the Democratic Socialists of America.Contents1 Early years 2 Political career 3 Writer 4 Death 5 Legacy 6 Works6.1 Books and pamphlets 6.2 Articles, introductions, translations7 References 8 Further reading8.1 Primary sources9 External linksEarly years[edit] Howe was born as Irving Horenstein in The Bronx, New York. He was the son of Jewish immigrants from Bessarabia, Nettie (née Goldman) and David Horenstein, who ran a small grocery store that went out of business during the Great Depression.[1] His father became a peddler and eventually a presser in a dress factory
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Bantam Books
Bantam Books
Bantam Books
is an American publishing house owned entirely by parent company Random House, a subsidiary of Penguin Random House; it is an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group. It was formed in 1945 by Walter B. Pitkin, Jr., Sidney B. Kramer, and Ian and Betty Ballantine. It has since been purchased several times by companies including National General, Carl Lindner's American Financial and, most recently, Bertelsmann; it became part of Random House in 1998, when Bertelsmann
Bertelsmann
purchased it to form Bantam Doubleday Dell.[1] It began as a mass market publisher, mostly of reprints of hardcover books, with some original paperbacks as well
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Criminal
In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority.[1] The term "crime" does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition,[2] though statutory definitions have been provided for certain purposes.[3] The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law; in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law.[2] One proposed definition is that a crime or offence (or criminal offence) is an act harmful not only to some individual but also to a community, society or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law.[1][4] The notion that acts such as murder, rape and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide.[5] What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by criminal law of each country
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