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FN FAL
700 rounds/min (fully automatic), variable (semi-automatic)Muzzle velocity 840 m/s (2,756 ft/s)Effective firing range 200–600 m sight adjustmentsFeed system 20- or 30-round detachable box magazine. 50-round drum magazines are also available.[3]Sights Aperture rear sight, post front sight; sight radius:The FN FAL
FN FAL
(French: Fusil Automatique Léger, English: Light Automatic Rifle), is a battle rifle designed by Belgian small arms designers Dieudonné Saive and Ernest Vervier and manufactured by Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal (FN Herstal). During the Cold War
Cold War
the FAL was adopted by many countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), with the notable exception of the United States
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Rifle Grenade
A rifle grenade is a grenade that uses a rifle-based launcher to permit a longer effective range than would be possible if the grenade was thrown by hand. The practice of projecting grenades with rifle-mounted launchers was first widely used during World War I
World War I
and continues to the present, with the term "rifle grenade" now encompassing many different types of payloads including high explosive, fragmentation, and anti-tank warheads as well as concussion, smoke, incendiary, and flare missiles.
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Harry Truman
Harry S. Truman[b] (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953), taking the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. A World War I
World War I
veteran, he assumed the presidency during the waning months of World War II
World War II
and the beginning of the Cold War. He is known for implementing the Marshall Plan
Marshall Plan
to rebuild the economy of Western Europe, for the establishment of the Truman Doctrine
Truman Doctrine
and NATO against Soviet and Chinese Communism, and for intervening in the Korean War. In domestic affairs, he was a moderate Democrat whose liberal proposals were a continuation of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, but the conservative-dominated Congress blocked most of them
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Imperial Units
The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial[1] or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The Imperial units
Imperial units
replaced the Winchester Standards, which were in effect from 1588 to 1825.[2] The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, although some imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom, Canada
Canada
and other countries formerly part of the British Empire
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Labour Party (UK)
The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom. It has been described as a broad church, bringing together an alliance of social democratic, democratic socialist and trade unionist outlooks.[9] The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights. Labour is a full member of the Party of European Socialists
Party of European Socialists
and Progressive Alliance, and holds observer status in the Socialist
Socialist
International. As of 2017, the party is considered the "largest party in Western Europe" in terms of party membership, with more than half-a-million members.[10] The Labour Party was founded in 1900, having grown out of the trade union movement and socialist parties of the nineteenth century
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Winston Churchill
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG OM CH TD DL FRS RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer, serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As a Member of Parliament (MP), he represented five constituencies during his career. As Prime Minister, Churchill oversaw British victory in the Second World War. Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he was a member of the Liberal Party from 1904 to 1924 before joining the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955. Born in Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to an aristocratic family, Churchill was the son of an English politician and an American socialite. Joining the British Army, he saw action in British India, the Anglo–Sudan War, and the Second Boer
Boer
War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns
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Quid Pro Quo
Quid pro quo ("something for something" in Latin)[1] is a phrase used in English to mean an exchange of goods or services, in which one transfer is contingent upon the other; "a favour for a favour". Phrases with similar meanings include: "give and take", "tit for tat", and "you scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours".Contents1 In common law1.1 United Kingdom2 Origins 3 In literature 4 Other meanings 5 See also 6 NotesIn common law[edit] In common law, quid pro quo indicates that an item or a service has been traded in return for something of value, usually when the propriety or equity of the transaction is in question. A contract must involve consideration: that is, the exchange of something of value for something else of value
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Warsaw Pact
The Warsaw
Warsaw
Pact, formally known as the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance,[1] was a collective defence treaty signed in Warsaw, Poland
Poland
among the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and seven Soviet satellite states of Central and Eastern Europe
Central and Eastern Europe
during the Cold War. The Warsaw
Warsaw
Pact was the military complement to the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CoMEcon), the regional economic organization for the socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe
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Intermediate Cartridge
An intermediate cartridge is a rifle/carbine cartridge that is less powerful than typical full-power battle rifle cartridges (such as the .303 British, 7.62×54mmR, 7.92×57mm Mauser, .30-06 Springfield
.30-06 Springfield
or 7.62×51mm NATO), but still has significantly longer effective range than pistol/personal defense weapon cartridges.[1] As their recoil is significantly reduced compared to full-power rifle cartridges, fully automatic rifles firing intermediate cartridges are relatively easy to control. However, even though less powerful than a traditional full-power rifle cartridge, the ballistics are still sufficient for an effective range of 300–600 metres (330–660 yd), which are the maximum typical engagement ranges in modern combat
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AKM
The AKM
AKM
(Russian: Автома́т Кала́шникова модернизи́рованный, tr. Avtomát Kaláshnikova modernizírovanny, lit. Modernized Kalashnikov Automatic Rifle) is a 7.62mm assault rifle designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov. It is a common modernized variant of the AK-47
AK-47
rifle developed in the 1940s. Introduced into service with the Soviet Army
Soviet Army
in 1959, the AKM
AKM
is the most ubiquitous variant of the entire AK series of firearms and it has found widespread use with most member states of the former Warsaw Pact and its African and Asian allies as well as being widely exported and produced in many other countries. The production of these rifles was carried out at both the Tula Arms Plant
Tula Arms Plant
and Izhmash
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Rifle
Evolution of the modern rifle: Top: Baker rifle, an early 19th-century flintlock rifle. Second: Pattern 1853 Enfield, a mid 19th-century caplock rifled musket. Third: Dreyse needle gun, the first standard issue military breechloading rifle. Fourth: Henry rifle, the first successful lever action repeating rifle. Fifth: Lebel Model 1886 rifle, a late 19th-century bolt-action rifle and the first to use smokeless powder. Sixth: M1 Garand, an early 20th-century semi-automatic rifle and the first to be adopted as standard military issue. Seventh: АК-47, a mid 20th-century gas-operated, magazine-fed automatic rifle. Eighth: FAMAS, a late 20th-century selective fire, bullpup assault rifle.A rifle is a portable long-barrelled firearm designed for precision shooting, to be held with both hands and braced against the shoulder during firing, and with a barrel that has a helical pattern of grooves ("rifling") cut into the bore walls
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Gas-operated
Gas-operation is a system of operation used to provide energy to operate autoloading firearms. In gas operation, a portion of high-pressure gas from the cartridge being fired is used to power a mechanism to extract the spent case and insert a new cartridge into the chamber. Energy from the gas is harnessed through either a port in the barrel or a trap at the muzzle. This high-pressure gas impinges on a surface such as a piston head to provide motion for unlocking of the action, extraction of the spent case, ejection, cocking of the hammer or striker, chambering of a fresh cartridge, and locking of the action
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Receiver (firearms)
In firearms terminology, the firearm receiver or firearm frame is the part of a firearm which provides housing for internal components such as the hammer, bolt or breechblock, action and firing mechanism, and is usually threaded at its forward portion to "receive" the barrel and has screw holes on the bottom and/or rear to receive the stock and grip.[1] The receiver is often made of forged, machined, or stamped steel or aluminium; in addition to these traditional materials, modern science and engineering have introduced polymers and sintered metal powders to receiver construction.[2]Contents1 In US law1.1 Unfinished receivers2 Notable receivers 3 ReferencesIn US law[edit] AR-15
AR-15
rifles showing their configurations with different upper receivers (stripped-down lower receiver is visible at bottom)For the purposes of United States law, the receiver or frame is legally the firearm,[3] and as such it is the controlled part
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