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F2FS
F2FS (Flash-Friendly File
File
System) is a flash file system initially developed by Samsung Electronics
Samsung Electronics
for the Linux
Linux
kernel.[2] The motive for F2FS was to build a file system that, from the start, takes into account the characteristics of NAND flash memory-based storage devices (such as solid-state disks, eMMC, and SD cards), which are widely used in computer systems ranging from mobile devices to servers. F2FS was designed on a basis of a log-structured file system approach, which is adapted to newer forms of storage. Jaegeuk Kim, the principal F2FS author, has stated that it remedies some known issues[2] of the older log-structured file systems, such as the snowball effect of wandering trees and high cleaning overhead
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Defragmentation
In the maintenance of file systems, defragmentation is a process that reduces the amount of fragmentation. It does this by physically organizing the contents of the mass storage device used to store files into the smallest number of contiguous regions (fragments). It also attempts to create larger regions of free space using compaction to impede the return of fragmentation. Some defragmentation utilities try to keep smaller files within a single directory together, as they are often accessed in sequence. Defragmentation
Defragmentation
is advantageous and relevant to file systems on electromechanical disk drives
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Next3
Next3 is a journaled file system for Linux
Linux
based on ext3 which adds snapshots support, yet retains compatibility to the ext3 on-disk format.[2][3] Next3 is implemented as open-source software, licensed under the GPL
GPL
license.Contents1 Background 2 Features2.1 Snapshots 2.2 Dynamically Provisioned Snapshots Space 2.3 Compatibility 2.4 Performance 2.5 Next43 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] A snapshot is a read-only copy of the file system frozen at a point in time. Versioning file systems like Next3 can internally track old versions of files and make snapshots available through a special namespace. Features[edit] Snapshots[edit] An advantage of copy-on-write is that when Next3 writes new data, the blocks containing the old data can be retained, allowing a snapshot version of the file system to be maintained
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QNX4FS
QNX4FS is an extent-based file system used by the QNX4 and QNX6 operating systems. As the file system uses soft updates, it remains consistent even after a power failure, without using journaling. Instead, the writes are carefully ordered and flushed to disk at appropriate intervals so that the on-disk structure always remains consistent, no matter if the operation is interrupted. However, unflushed changes to the file system are nevertheless lost, as the disk cache is typically stored in volatile memory. This design has a considerable performance gain over journaling, by just bypassing that step.[citation needed] Another notable property of this file system is that its actual metadata, like inode information and disk bitmaps, are accessible in the same way as any other file on the file system (as /.inodes and /.bitmap, respectively)
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Hammer
A hammer is a tool or device that delivers a blow (a sudden impact) to an object. Most hammers are hand tools used to drive nails, fit parts, forge metal, and break apart objects. Hammers vary in shape, size, and structure depending on their purposes. Hammers are basic tools in many trades. The usual features are a head (most often made of steel) and a handle (also called a helve or haft). Although most hammers are hand tools, powered versions exist; they are known as powered hammers. Types of power hammer include steam hammers and trip hammers, often for heavier uses, such as forging. Some specialized hammers have other names, such as sledgehammer, mallet, and gavel
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Soup (Apple)
Soup is the file system for the Apple Newton
Apple Newton
platform, based on a shallow database system. The Newton considers its internal storage, and each inserted card, as a separate "store" (a volume). Any store may have either read/write "soups" (databases) or read-only objects called "packages" (Packages are roughly equivalent to applications, though they may also be storage areas or plug-ins). A soup is a simple, one-table database of "entries" which may be indexed in different ways and queried by a variety of methods. Various soups store the Newton's equivalent of "documents" or "files." The Newton has a rich set of indexing and querying mechanisms for soups. One important index is the "tags" index
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Samsung Electronics
Samsung
Samsung
Electronics
Electronics
Co., Ltd. (Korean: 삼성전자; Hanja: 三星電子 (Literally "tristar electronics")) is a South Korean multinational electronics company headquartered in Suwon, South Korea.[1] Through extremely complicated ownership structure with some circular ownership,[3] it is the flagship company of the Samsung Group, accounting for 70% of the group's revenue in 2012.[4] Samsung Electronics
Electronics
has assembly plants and sales networks in 80 countries and employs around 308,745 people.[2] It is the world's largest information technology company by revenue
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Xsan
Xsan[needs IPA] is Apple Inc.'s storage area network (SAN) or clustered file system for macOS. Xsan
Xsan
enables multiple Mac desktop and Xserve
Xserve
systems to access shared block storage over a Fibre Channel network. With the Xsan
Xsan
file system installed, these computers can read and write to the same storage volume at the same time
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Phoronix
Phoronix
Phoronix
is a technology website that offers insights regarding the development of the Linux
Linux
kernel, product reviews, interviews, and news regarding free and open-source software by monitoring the
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Michael Larabel
Phoronix
Phoronix
is a technology website that offers insights regarding the development of the Linux
Linux
kernel, product reviews, interviews, and news regarding free and open-source software by monitoring the
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Atomic Operations
In concurrent programming, an operation (or set of operations) is atomic, linearizable, indivisible or uninterruptible if it appears to the rest of the system to occur at once without being interrupted. Atomicity is a guarantee of isolation from interrupts, signals, concurrent processes and threads. It is relevant for thread safety and reentrancy. Additionally, atomic operations commonly have a succeed-or-fail definition—they either successfully change the state of the system, or have no apparent effect. In a concurrent system, processes can access a shared object at the same time. Because multiple processes are accessing a single object, there may arise a situation in which while one process is accessing the object, another process changes its contents. This example demonstrates the need for linearizability. In a linearizable system although operations overlap on a shared object, each operation appears to take place instantaneously
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Fsck
The system utility fsck (file system consistency check) is a tool for checking the consistency of a file system in Unix
Unix
and Unix-like operating systems, such as Linux, macOS, and FreeBSD.[1] A similar command, CHKDSK
CHKDSK
exists in Microsoft Windows.Contents1 Pronunciation 2 Use 3 As an expletive 4 Examples 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPronunciation[edit] There is no agreed pronunciation. It can be pronounced "F-S-C-K", "F-S-check", "fizz-check", "F-sack", "fisk", "fizik", "F-sick", "F-sock", "F-sek", the sibilant "fsk", "farsk" or "fusk".[2] Use[edit] Generally, fsck is run either automatically at boot time, or manually by the system administrator. The command works directly on data structures stored on disk, which are internal and specific to the particular file system in use - so an fsck command tailored to the file system is generally required
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Inode
The inode is a data structure in a Unix-style file system that describes a filesystem object such as a file or a directory. Each inode stores the attributes and disk block location(s) of the object's data.[1] Filesystem
Filesystem
object attributes may include metadata (times of last change,[2] access, modification), as well as owner and permission data.[3] Directories are lists of names assigned to inodes. A directory contains an entry for itself, its parent, and each of its children.Contents1 Etymology 2 Details 3 POSIX inode description 4 Implications 5 Practical considerations 6 Inlining 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] There has been uncertainty on the Linux kernel mailing list about the reason for the "i" in "inode". In 2002, the question was brought to Unix pioneer Dennis Ritchie, who replied:[4]In truth, I don't know either. It was just a term that we started to use
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Trim (computing)
A trim command (known as TRIM in the ATA command set, and UNMAP in the SCSI command set) allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally.[1] Trim was introduced soon after SSDs were introduced
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Terabyte
The terabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The prefix tera represents the fourth power of 1000, and means 1012 in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), and therefore one terabyte is one trillion (short scale) bytes. The unit symbol for the terabyte is TB.Contents1 Definition 2 History 3 Illustrative usage examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] 1 TB = 1000000000000bytes = 1012bytes = 1000gigabytes. A related unit, the tebibyte (TiB), using a binary prefix, is equal to 10244 bytes. One terabyte is about 0.9095 TiB
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