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Ezechiel
Ezekiel
Ezekiel
(/ɪˈziːkiəl/; Hebrew: יְחֶזְקֵאל‬ Y'ḥezqēl [jəħɛzˈqēl]) is the central protagonist of the Book of Ezekiel
Book of Ezekiel
in the Hebrew Bible. In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Ezekiel
Ezekiel
is acknowledged as a Hebrew prophet. In Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity, he is also viewed as the 6th-century BCE author of the Book of Ezekiel
Book of Ezekiel
that reveals prophecies regarding the destruction of Jerusalem, the restoration to the land of Israel, and what some call the Millennial Temple visions, or the Third Temple
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Shadrach, Meshach, And Abednego
Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego
Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego
are figures from chapter 3 of the Book of Daniel, three Hebrew men thrown into a fiery furnace by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, when they refuse to bow down to the king's image; the three are preserved from harm and the king sees four men walking in the flames, "the fourth ..
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Jeremiah
Jeremiah
Jeremiah
(/dʒɛrɪˈmaɪ.ə/;[1] Hebrew: יִרְמְיָהוּ‬, Modern: Yirmeyahu  [jiʁmeˈjahu], Tiberian: Yirmĭyāhū; Greek: Ἰερεμίας; Arabic: إرميا‎ Irmiyā meaning "Yah Exalts"), also called the "Weeping prophet",[2] was one of the major prophets of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament). According to Jewish tradition, Jeremiah
Jeremiah
authored the Book of Jeremiah, the Books of Kings and the Book of Lamentations,[3] with the assistance and under the editorship of Baruch ben Neriah, his scribe and disciple. Greater detail is known about Jeremiah's life than for that of any other prophet
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Josephus
Titus
Titus
Flavius Josephus
Josephus
(/dʒoʊˈsiːfəs/;[1] Greek: Φλάβιος Ἰώσηπος; 37 – c. 100),[2][page needed] born Yosef ben Matityahu (Hebrew: יוסף הכהן בן מתתיהו‬, Yosef ben Matityahu; Greek: Ἰώσηπος Ματθίου παῖς),[3][4] was a first-century Romano-Jewish scholar, historian and hagiographer, who was born in Jerusalem—then part of Roman Judea—to a father of priestly descent and a mother who claimed royal ancestry. He initially fought against the Romans during the First Jewish–Roman War as head of Jewish forces in Galilee, until surrendering in 67 CE to Roman forces led by Vespasian
Vespasian
after the six-week siege of Jotapata. Josephus
Josephus
claimed the Jewish Messianic prophecies that initiated the First Roman-Jewish War made reference to Vespasian
Vespasian
becoming Emperor of Rome
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Nebuchadnezzar II
Nebuchadnezzar II
Nebuchadnezzar II
(from Akkadian
Akkadian
𒀭𒀝𒆪𒁺𒌨𒊑𒋀 dNabû-kudurri-uṣur, Hebrew: נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּר‬, Modern Nəvūkádne’ṣar, Tiberian Neḇukáḏné’ṣār), meaning "O god Nabu, preserve/defend my firstborn son") was king of Babylon c. 605 BC – c. 562 BC, the longest and most powerful reign of any monarch in the Neo-Babylonian empire.[2][3]Contents1 Life1.1 Reign2 Portrayal in the Bible 3 Portrayal in medieval Muslim
Muslim
sources 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife[edit]Building Inscription of King Nebuchadnezar II at the Ishtar Gate. An abridged excerpt says: "I (Nebuchadnezzar) laid the foundation of the gates down to the ground water level and had them built out of pure blue stone
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Babylonia
Babylonia
Babylonia
(/ˌbæbəˈloʊniə, -ˈloʊnjə/) was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(present-day Iraq). A small Amorite-ruled state emerged in 1894 BC, which contained the minor administrative town of Babylon.[1] It was merely a small provincial town during the Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire (2335–2154 BC) but greatly expanded during the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
in the first half of the 18th century BC and became a major capital city. During the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
and afterwards, Babylonia
Babylonia
was called "the country of Akkad" (Māt Akkadī in Akkadian).[2][3] It was often involved in rivalry with the older state of Assyria
Assyria
to the north and Elam
Elam
to the east in Ancient Iran
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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Chebar River
Tel Abib (Hebrew: תל-אביב‎, Tel Aviv; lit. "Spring Mound", where Spring (Aviv) is the season) is an unidentified tell (hill city) on the Kebar Canal, near Nippur
Nippur
in what is now Iraq
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Tel Abib
Tel Abib (Hebrew: תל-אביב‎, Tel Aviv; lit. "Spring Mound", where Spring (Aviv) is the season) is an unidentified tell (hill city) on the Kebar Canal, near Nippur
Nippur
in what is now Iraq
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Yahweh
Yahweh
Yahweh
(/ˈjɑːhweɪ/, or often /ˈjɑːweɪ/ in English; Hebrew: יַהְוֶה‬ [jahˈweh]) was the national god of the Iron Age kingdoms of Israel (Samaria) and Judah.[3] His exact origins are disputed, although they reach back to the early Iron Age
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Cherub
A cherub (/ˈtʃɛrəb/;[1] also pl. cherubim; Hebrew: כְּרוּב‎ kərūv, pl. כְּרוּבִים‬, kərūvîm; Latin
Latin
cherub, pl. cherubin, cherubim; Syriac ܟܪܘܒܐ) is one of the unearthly beings who directly attend to God
God
according to Abrahamic religions
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City Of David
The City of David
David
(Hebrew: עיר דוד‬, Ir David; literal translation to Arabic: مدينة داوود‎, Madina Dawud, common Arabic name: وادي حلوه, Wadi Hilweh) is an Israeli settlement and the archaeological site which is speculated to compose the original urban core of ancient Jerusalem.[1][2][3][4][5] First suggested in 1920, the name was used officially from the 1970s, following the capture of East Jerus
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Siege Of Jerusalem (587 BC)
In 589 BC, Nebuchadnezzar II
Nebuchadnezzar II
laid siege to Jerusalem, culminating in the destruction of the city and its temple in the summer of 587 or 586 BC.Contents1 Siege 2 Chronological notes 3 Timeline of events in final siege 4 ReferencesSiege[edit] Following the siege of 597 BC, the Neo-Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar installed Zedekiah
Zedekiah
as tributary king of Judah, at the age of 21. However, Zedekiah
Zedekiah
revolted against Babylon, and entered into an alliance with Pharaoh Hophra, the king of Egypt. Nebuchadnezzar responded by invading Judah[1] and began a siege of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
in December 589 BC
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Kohen
Four gifts given in Jerusalem 11. Firstborn animal · 12. Firstfruits 13. Burnt offering (Judaism) · 14. Parts of the thank offering and Nazirite's offering Ten gifts given (even) outside of Jerusalem 15. Heave offering 16. Heave offering of the Levite's tithe 17. Dough offering 18. First shearing of the sheep 19. Shoulder, cheeks and maw 20. Coins for redemption of the first born son · 21. Redemption of a donkey  · 22. Dedication of property to a priest  · 23. Field not redeemed in a Jubilee year · 24
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Holocaust Survivors
Sh'erit ha-Pletah
Sh'erit ha-Pletah
(Hebrew: שארית הפליטה‎, lit. 'the surviving remnant') is a biblical (Ezra 9:14 and 1 Chronicles
1 Chronicles
4:43) term used by Jewish refugees
Jewish refugees
who survived the Holocaust to refer to themselves and the communities they formed in postwar Europe following the liberation in the spring of 1945. Hundreds of thousands of survivors spent several years following their repatriation in Displaced Persons (DP) camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy
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Yad Vashem
Yad Vashem
Yad Vashem
(Hebrew: יָד וַשֵׁם‬; literally, "a monument and a name") is Israel's official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust. It is dedicated to preserving the memory of the dead; honoring Jews who fought against their Nazi
Nazi
oppressors and Gentiles who selflessly aided Jews in need; and researching the phenomenon of the Holocaust
Holocaust
in particular and genocide in general, with the aim of avoiding such events in the future. Established in 1953, Yad Vashem
Yad Vashem
is on the western slope of Mount Herzl, also known as the Mount of Remembrance, a height in western Jerusalem, 804 meters (2,638 ft) above sea level and adjacent to the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Forest
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