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Evergreen
In botany, an evergreen is a plant that has leaves throughout the year, always green. This is true even if the plant retains its foliage only in warm climates, and contrasts with deciduous plants, which completely lose their foliage during the winter or dry season
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Encyclopedia Americana
Encyclopedia
Encyclopedia
Americana is one of the largest general encyclopedias in the English language. Following the acquisition of Grolier in 2000, the encyclopedia has been produced by Scholastic. The encyclopedia has more than 45,000 articles, most of them more than 500 words and many running to considerable length (the "United States" article is over 300,000 words). The work's coverage of American and Canadian geography and history has been a traditional strength. Written by 6,500 contributors, the Encyclopedia
Encyclopedia
Americana includes over 9,000 bibliographies, 150,000 cross-references, 1,000+ tables, 1,200 maps, and almost 4,500 black-and-white line art and color images. It also has 680 factboxes. Most articles are signed by their contributors. Long available as a 30-volume print set, the Encyclopedia
Encyclopedia
Americana is now marketed as an online encyclopedia requiring a subscription
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Jack Pine
Jack pine
Jack pine
(Pinus banksiana) is an eastern North American pine. Its native range in Canada
Canada
is east of the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
from the Mackenzie River
Mackenzie River
in the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
to Cape Breton Island
Cape Breton Island
in Nova Scotia, and the north-central and northeast of the United States from Minnesota
Minnesota
to Maine, with the southernmost part of the range just into northwest Indiana
Indiana
and northwest Pennsylvania. It is also known as grey pine[4] and scrub pine.[4][5] In the far west of its range, Pinus banksiana hybridizes readily with the closely related lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta)
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Oecologia
Oecologia is an international peer-reviewed English-language journal published by Springer since 1968 (some articles were published in German or French until 1976). The journal publishes original research in a range of topics related to plant and animal ecology. Oecologia has an international focus and presents original papers, methods, reviews and special topics. Papers focus on population ecology, plant-animal interactions, ecosystem ecology, community ecology, global change ecology, conservation ecology, behavioral ecology and physiological ecology. Oecologia had an impact factor of 3.011 (2012) and is ranked 37 out of 136 in the subject category "ecology".[1][2] Editorial Board[edit] As of June 2014, the journal has six editors in chief:[3]Carlos L. Ballaré (plant interactions), University of Buenos Aires, Argentina Roland Brandl (terrestrial invertebrate ecology), Philipps-University Marburg, Germany Katherine L
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Organic Matter In The Soil
Soil
Soil
organic matter (SOM) is the organic matter component of soil, consisting of plant and animal residues at various stages of decomposition, cells and tissues of soil organisms, and substances synthesized by soil organisms. SOM exerts numerous positive effects on soil physical and chemical properties, as well as the soil’s capacity to provide regulatory ecosystem services.[1] Particularly, the presence of SOM is regarded as being critical for soil function and soil quality.[2] The positive impacts of SOM result from a number of complex, interactive edaphic factors; a non-exhaustive list of SOM's effects on soil functioning includes improvements related to soil structure, aggregation, water retention, soil biodiversity, absorption and retention of pollutants, buffering capacity, and the cycling and storage of plant nutrients
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Psychrophile
Psychrophiles or cryophiles (adj. psychrophilic or cryophilic) are extremophilic organisms that are capable of growth and reproduction in low temperatures, ranging from −20 °C[1] to +10 °C. They are found in places that are permanently cold, such as the polar regions and the deep sea
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Flowering Plant
sweet bayScientific classificationKingdom: PlantaeSubkingdom: Embryophyta(unranked): Spermatophyta(unranked): AngiospermsGroups (APG IV)[1]Basal angiospermsAmborellales Nymphaeales AustrobaileyalesCore angiospermsmagnoliids Chloranthales monocots Ceratophyllales eudicotsSynonyms Anthophyta Cronquist[2] Angiospermae Lindl. Magnoliophyta Cronquist, Takht.
Takht.
& W.Zimm.[3] Magnolicae Takht.[4]The flowering plants, also known as angiosperms, Angiospermae[5][6] or Magnoliophyta,[7] are the most diverse group of land plants, with 416 families, approximately 13,164 known genera and c. 295,383 known species.[8] Like gymnosperms, angiosperms are seed-producing plants. However, they are distinguished from gymnosperms by characteristics including flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds
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Temperate Climate
In geography, the temperate or tepid climates of Earth
Earth
occur in the middle latitudes, which span between the tropics and the polar regions.[1] These zones generally have wider temperature ranges throughout the year and more distinct seasonal changes compared to tropical climates, where such variations are often small. In the Koppen climate classification, a climate is termed "temperate" when the coldest month has a mean temperature above -3 C (26.6 F) but below 18 C (64.4 F)
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South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States. The state is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the south and west by Georgia, across the Savannah River, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state. Its GDP
GDP
as of 2013 was $183.6 billion, with an annual growth rate of 3.13%.[6] South Carolina
South Carolina
is composed of 46 counties
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Pinus Longaeva
Pinus longaeva
Pinus longaeva
(commonly referred to as the Great Basin bristlecone pine, intermountain bristlecone pine, or western bristlecone pine)[2] is a long-living species of bristlecone pine tree found in the higher mountains of California, Nevada, and Utah.[3] One member of this species, at 5067 years old, is the oldest known living non-clonal organism on Earth.[4] In 1987, the bristlecone pine was designated one of Nevada's state trees.[5]Contents1 Physical characteristics 2 Distribution and ecology2.1 Fire ecology3 Age 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPhysical characteristics[edit] It is a medium-size tree, reaching 5 to 15 m (16 to 49 ft) tall and with a trunk diameter of up to 2.5 to 3.6 m (8 to 12 ft). The bark is bright orange-yellow, thin and scaly at the base of the trunk
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Clubmoss
Lycopodiopsida
Lycopodiopsida
is a class of herbaceous vascular plants known as the clubmosses and firmosses. They have dichotomously branching stems bearing simple leaves without ligules and reproduce by means of spores borne in sporangia at the bases of the leaves. Traditionally, the group also included the spikemosses ( Selaginella
Selaginella
and relatives) and the quillworts ( Isoetes
Isoetes
and relatives) but because these groups have leaves with ligules and reproduce using spores of two different sizes both are now placed into another class, Isoetopsida
Isoetopsida
that also includes the extinct Lepidodendrales
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Angiosperm
sweet bayScientific classificationKingdom: PlantaeSubkingdom: Embryophyta(unranked): Spermatophyta(unranked): AngiospermsGroups (APG IV)[1]Basal angiospermsAmborellales Nymphaeales AustrobaileyalesCore angiospermsmagnoliids Chloranthales monocots Ceratophyllales eudicotsSynonyms Anthophyta Cronquist[2] Angiospermae Lindl. Magnoliophyta Cronquist, Takht.
Takht.
& W.Zimm.[3] Magnolicae Takht.[4]The flowering plants, also known as angiosperms, Angiospermae[5][6] or Magnoliophyta,[7] are the most diverse group of land plants, with 416 families, approximately 13,164 known genera and c. 295,383 known species.[8] Like gymnosperms, angiosperms are seed-producing plants. However, they are distinguished from gymnosperms by characteristics including flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds
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Gymnosperm
Pinophyta
Pinophyta
(or Coniferophyta) - Conifers Ginkgophyta
Ginkgophyta
- Ginkgo Cycadophyta
Cycadophyta
- Cycads Gnetophyta
Gnetophyta
- Gnetum, Ephedra, Welwitschia Encephalartos sclavoi
Encephalartos sclavoi
cone, about 30 cm longThe gymnosperms are a group of seed-producing plants that includes conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. The term "gymnosperm" comes from the Greek composite word γυμνόσπερμος (γυμνός gymnos, "naked" and σπέρμα sperma, "seed"), meaning "naked seeds". The name is based on the unenclosed condition of their seeds (called ovules in their unfertilized state). The non-encased condition of their seeds stands in contrast to the seeds and ovules of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are enclosed within an ovary
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Larch
About 10–11; see textLarches are conifers in the genus Larix, of the family Pinaceae (subfamily Laricoideae). Growing from 20 to 45 m (66 to 148 ft) tall,[1] they are native to much of the cooler temperate northern hemisphere, on lowlands in the north and high on mountains further south. Larches are among the dominant plants in the boreal forests of Siberia
Siberia
and Canada. Although they are conifers, larches are deciduous trees that lose their needles in the autumn.Contents1 Description and distribution 2 Species and taxonomy2.1 North American species 2.2 Eurasian species2.2.1 Northern Eurasian species with short bracts 2.2.2 Southern Euroasiatic species with long bracts3 Diseases 4 Uses 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription and distribution[edit] Larches can reach 50–60 m ( Larix
Larix
occidentalis)
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Eucalypt
Eucalypt
Eucalypt
is a descriptive name for woody plants with capsule fruiting bodies belonging to seven closely related genera (of the tribe Eucalypteae) found across Australasia: Eucalyptus, Corymbia, Angophora, Stockwellia, Allosyncarpia, Eucalyptopsis and Arillastrum.[1]Contents1 Evolution and distrib
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