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Evangelicalism In The United States
In the United States, evangelicalism is an umbrella group of Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority and the historicity of the Bible.[1] Nearly a quarter of the US population, evangelicals are diverse and drawn from a variety of denominational backgrounds, including Baptist, Mennonite, Holiness, Pentecostal, Reformed, and nondenominational churches.[2] Evangelicalism
Evangelicalism
has played an important role in shaping American religion and culture. The First Great Awakening
First Great Awakening
of the 18th century marked the rise of evangelical religion in colonial America
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The Call (organization)
TheCall is an organization which sponsors prayer meetings led by Lou Engle along with other Christian leaders pastors in the United States. The meetings request prayer and fasting by Christians in protest against issues such as same-sex marriage and legal access to elective abortion. TheCall has drawn support from American Evangelical leaders, but has also been criticized for intolerance.Contents1 Events 2 Uganda
Uganda
controversy 3 Gatherings 4 References 5 External linksEvents[edit] Originally planned as a co-ed youth version of Promise Keepers,[1][permanent dead link] TheCall hosts 12-hour or 24-hour events which combine prayer, sermons, and Christian rock
Christian rock
worship and gospel music
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Billy Graham
William Franklin Graham
Franklin Graham
Jr. KBE (November 7, 1918 – February 21, 2018) was an American evangelist, a prominent evangelical Christian figure, and an ordained Southern Baptist minister who became well known internationally in the late 1940s. One of his biographers has placed him "among the most influential Christian leaders" of the 20th century.[2] As a preacher, he held large indoor and outdoor rallies with sermons broadcast on radio and television, some were still being re-broadcast into the 21st century.[3] In his six decades of television, Graham hosted annual Billy
Billy
Graham Crusades, which ran from 1947 until his retirement in 2005. He also hosted the radio show Hour of Decision from 1950 to 1954
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Historical Criticism
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eHistorical criticism, also known as the historical-critical method or higher criticism, is a branch of criticism that investigates the origins of ancient texts in order to understand "the world behind the text".[1] While often discussed in terms of Jewish and Christian writings from ancient times, historical criticism has also been applied to other religious writings from various parts of the world and periods of history. The primary goal of historical criticism is to discover the text's primitive or original meaning in its original historical context and its literal sense or sensus literalis historicus. The secondary goal seeks to establish a reconstruction of the historical situation of the author and recipients of the text
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Protestant Bible
A Protestant Bible
Protestant Bible
is a Christian Bible
Christian Bible
translation or revision produced by Protestants. Such Bibles comprise 39 books of the Old Testament (according to the Jewish Hebrew Bible canon, known especially to non- Protestants
Protestants
as the protocanonical books) and the 27 books of the New Testament
New Testament
for a total of 66 books
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Christian Fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
began in the late 19th and early 20th centuries among British and American Protestants[1][2] as a reaction to theological liberalism and cultural modernism. Fundamentalists argued that 19th-century modernist theologians had misinterpreted or rejected certain doctrines, especially biblical inerrancy, that they viewed as the fundamentals of the Christian faith.[3] Fundamentalists are almost always described as having a literal interpretation of the Bible
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Biblical Inerrancy
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eBiblical inerrancy, as formulated in the "Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy", is the doctrine that the Protestant
Protestant
Bible
Bible
"is without error or fault in all its teaching";[1] or, at least, that " Scripture
Scripture
in the original manuscripts does not affirm anything that is contrary to fact".[2] A formal statement in favor of biblical inerrancy was published in the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
in 1978.[3] The signatories to the "Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy" admit that "inspiration, strictly speaking, applies only to the autographic text of Scripture"
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Dispensationalist
Dispensationalism is a religious interpretive system for the Bible. It considers Biblical history as divided by God into dispensations, defined periods or ages to which God has allotted distinctive administrative principles
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Fundamentalist–Modernist Controversy
The Fundamentalist–Modernist Controversy
Fundamentalist–Modernist Controversy
was a major schism that originated in the 1920s and '30s within the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. At issue were foundational disputes about the role of Christianity, the authority of Scripture, the death, Resurrection, and atoning sacrifice of Jesus.[1] Two broad factions within Protestantism emerged; Evangelicals who held to traditional Christian Orthodoxy, and Modernists who to varying degrees argued that "antiquated" beliefs should be modified for the times. At first, the schism was limited to Reformed Christianity
Christianity
and centered about Princeton Theological Seminary, but soon spread, affecting every denomination of Christianity
Christianity
in the United States
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Ecclesiastical Separatism
Ecclesiastical separatism
Ecclesiastical separatism
is the withdrawal of people and churches from Christian denominations, usually to form new denominations. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the separating puritans advocated departure from the Church of England. These people became known as dissenters. Ecclesiastical separatism
Ecclesiastical separatism
has also been associated with Christian fundamentalism, and such withdrawals have been mainly due to perceived theological liberalism. They have often been accompanied by a refusal to have any further association with the parent denomination or Christian fellowship with its members. George Marsden notes that Arno C
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Christianity Today
Christianity
Christianity
Today magazine is an evangelical Christian periodical that was founded in 1956 and is based in Carol Stream, Illinois
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History Of United States Prison Systems
Imprisonment as a form of criminal punishment only became widespread in the United States
United States
just before the American Revolution, though penal incarceration efforts had been ongoing in England
England
since as early as the 1500s, and prisons in the form of dungeons and various detention facilities had existed since long before then. Prison
Prison
building efforts in the United States
United States
came in three major waves. The first began during the Jacksonian Era
Jacksonian Era
and led to widespread use of imprisonment and rehabilitative labor as the primary penalty for most crimes in nearly all states by the time of the American Civil War
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Fuller Theological Seminary
Fuller Theological Seminary is a seminary in Pasadena, California, with several regional campuses in the western United States. The seminary has approximately 4,000 students from 90 countries and 110 denominations.[1]Contents1 History 2 Theology and academics 3 Schools and degrees3.1 School of Theology 3.2 School of Psychology 3.3 School of Intercultural Studies 3.4 Campuses4 Social issues 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Fuller Theological Seminary was founded in 1947 by Charles E. Fuller, a radio evangelist known for his Old Fashioned Revival Hour show, and Harold Ockenga, the pastor of Park Street Church
Park Street Church
in Boston
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1960s Counterculture
The counterculture of the 1960s refers to an anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed first in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) and then spread throughout much of the Western world between the early 1960s and the mid-1970s, with London, New York City, and San Francisco being hotbeds of early countercultural activity. The aggregate movement gained momentum as the Civil Rights Movement continued to grow, and would later become revolutionary with the expansion of the U.S. government's extensive military intervention in Vietnam.[3][4][5] As the 1960s progressed, widespread social tensions also developed concerning other issues, and tended to flow along generational lines regarding human sexuality, women's rights, traditional modes of authority, experimentation with psychoactive drugs, and differing interpretations of the American Dream
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Voting Bloc
A voting bloc is a group of voters that are strongly motivated by a specific common concern or group of concerns to the point that such specific concerns tend to dominate their voting patterns, causing them to vote together in elections.[1] For example, Beliefnet identifies 12 main religious blocs in American politics, including e.g. the "Religious Right", whose concerns are dominated by religious and sociocultural issues and "White Bread Protestants", who, while also conservative, tend to care more about economic issues.[2] The result is that each of these groups votes en bloc in elections. See also[edit]Political alliance Political party VotebankReferences[edit]^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bloc ^ http://www.beliefnet.com/News/Politics/2004/10/The-Twelve-Tribes-Of-American-Politics.aspxThis article about politics is a stub
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