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Eva Perón
Eva María Duarte de Perón
Perón
(7 May 1919 – 26 July 1952) was the wife of Argentine President Juan Perón
Juan Perón
(1895–1974) and First Lady of Argentina
Argentina
from 1946 until her death in 1952. She is usually referred to as Eva Perón
Eva Perón
or Evita. She was born in poverty in the rural village of Los Toldos, in the Pampas, as the youngest of five children. At 15 in 1934, she moved to the nation's capital of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
to pursue a career as a stage, radio, and film actress. She met Colonel Juan Perón
Juan Perón
there on 22 January 1944 during a charity event at the Luna Park Stadium to benefit the victims of an earthquake in San Juan, Argentina. The two were married the following year
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Surname
A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).[1] Depending on the culture all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules. In the English-speaking world, a surname is commonly referred to as a last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's full name, after any given names. In many parts of Asia, as well as some parts of Europe
Europe
and Africa, the family name is placed before a person's given name. In most Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking countries, two surnames are commonly used and in some families that claim a connection to nobility even three are used. Surnames have not always existed and today are not universal in all cultures. This tradition has arisen separately in different cultures around the world
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French Basque Country
The French Basque Country, or Northern Basque Country (Basque: Iparralde (i.e. 'the Northern Region'), French: Pays basque français, Spanish: País Vasco francés) is a region lying on the west of the French department
French department
of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques. Since 1 January 2017, it constitutes the Basque Municipal Community
Basque Municipal Community
(Basque: Euskal Hirigune Elkargoa; French: Communauté d'Agglomeration du Basque) presided over by Jean-René Etchegaray.[1][2] It includes three former historic French provinces in the north-east of the traditional Basque Country totalling 2,869 km²: Lower Navarre
Navarre
(French: Basse-Navarre; Basque: Nafarroa Beherea), until 1789 nominally Kingdom of Navarre, with 1,284 km²; Labourd
Labourd
(Basque: Lapurdi), with 800 km²; Soule
Soule
(Basque: Zuberoa), with 785 km²
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Bourgeoisie
The bourgeoisie (/ˌbʊərʒwɑːˈziː/; French: [buʁʒwazi]) is a polysemous French term that can mean:originally and generally, "those who live in the borough", that is to say, the people of the city (including merchants and craftsmen), as opposed to those of rural areas; in this sense, the bourgeoisie began to grow in Europe from the 11th century and particularly during the Renaissance of the 12th century, with the first developments of rural exodus and urbanization. a legally defined class of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the end of the Ancien Régime (Old Regime) in France, that of inhabitants having the rights of citizenship and political rights in a city (comparable to the German term Bürgertum and Bürger; see also "Burgher"). This bourgeoisie destroyed aristocratic privilege and established civic equality after the French monarchy collapsed
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Married Name
When a person (traditionally the wife in many cultures) assumes the family name of his or her spouse, that name replaces the person's birth surname, which in the case of the wife is called the maiden name (birth name is also used as a gender-neutral or masculine substitute for maiden name), whereas a married name is a family name or surname adopted by a person upon marriage. In some jurisdictions, changing one's name requires a legal procedure. Nevertheless, in some jurisdictions anyone who either marries or divorces may change his or her name
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Collective Consciousness
Collective
Collective
consciousness, collective conscience, or collective conscious (French: conscience collective) is the set of shared beliefs, ideas and moral attitudes which operate as a unifying force within society.[1] The term was introduced by the French sociologist Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
in his Division of Labour in Society
Division of Labour in Society
in 1893. The French word conscience generally means "conscience", "consciousness", "awareness",[2] or "perception".[3] Commentators and translators of Durkheim disagree on which is most appropriate, or whether the translation should depend on the context
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Passion (emotion)
Passion (Greek πασχω[1] and late Latin (Christian theology) pati[2]: "suffer") is a feeling of intense enthusiasm towards or compelling desire for someone or something. Passion can range from eager interest in or admiration for an idea, proposal, or cause; to enthusiastic enjoyment of an interest or activity; to strong attraction, excitement, or emotion towards a person. It is particularly used in the context of romance or sexual desire, though it generally implies a deeper or more encompassing emotion than that implied by the term lust. Denis Diderot
Denis Diderot
describes passions as "penchants, inclinations, desires and aversions carried to a certain degree of intensity, combined with an indistinct sensation of pleasure or pain, occasioned or accompanied by some irregular movement of the blood and animal spirits, are what we call passions
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First Holy Communion
First Communion
First Communion
is a ceremony in some Christian traditions during which a person first receives the Eucharist. It is most common in the Latin Church
Latin Church
tradition of the Catholic Church, as well as in many parts of the Lutheran Church and Anglican Communion. In churches that celebrate First Communion, it typically occurs between the ages of seven and thirteen, often acting as a rite of passage.Contents1 Characteristics 2 Traditions 3 History 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCharacteristics[edit]A little girl photographed for First Communion
First Communion
in Italy, c
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Buenos Aires Province
Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbwenos ˈaiɾes], Provincia de Buenos Aires; English: "good airs") is the largest and most populous Argentinian province. It takes the name from the city of Buenos Aires, which used to be part of the province and the provincial capital until it was federalized in 1880. Since then, in spite of bearing the same name, the province does not include the national capital city proper, though it does include all other localities of the Greater Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
metropolitan area surrounding it. The current capital of the province is the city of La Plata, founded in 1882. The province borders Entre Ríos to the northeast; Santa Fe to the north; Córdoba to the northwest, La Pampa
Pampa
to the west; and Río Negro to south and west; and the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
to the northeast
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Basques
The Basques
Basques
(/bɑːsks/ or /bæsks/; Basque: euskaldunak [eus̺kaldunak]; Spanish: vascos [ˈbaskos]; French: basques [bask]) are an indigenous ethnic group[6][7][8] characterised by the Basque language, a common culture and shared ancestry to the ancient Vascones and Aquitanians.[9] Basques
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Vice President Of Argentina
The office of Vice President of Argentina
Argentina
is the second highest political position in Argentina, and first in the line of succession to the Presidency of Argentina. The office was established with the enactment of the Argentine Constitution of 1853. The Vice President assumes presidential duties in a caretaker in case of absence or temporary incapacity of the head of state, and may succeed to the Presidency in case of resignation, permanent incapacity, or death of the President. The longest Vice Presidential tenure as caretaker in Argentine history took place between 1865 and 1868, while President Bartolomé Mitre
Bartolomé Mitre
was preoccupied with the Paraguayan War
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Chivilcoy
Chivilcoy
Chivilcoy
is a city in Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Province, Argentina, the head town of the Chivilcoy
Chivilcoy
Partido. It has 64,185 inhabitants according to the 2010 census [INDEC]. Twin Towns[edit] Menfi, Italy, since 1999v t e Main cities of Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
ProvinceCapital cityLa PlataMetropolitan citiesMar del Plata Bahía Blanca Tandil San Nicolás de los ArroyosGreater Buenos Aires area citiesAdrogué Avellaneda Banfield Béccar Bella Vista Berazategui Bernal Boulogne Sur Mer Burzaco Caseros Castelar Ciudad Evita Ciudadela Claypole El Palomar Florencio Varela Florida Glew González Catán Gregorio de Laferrère Grand Bourg Hurlingham Isidro Casanova Ituzaingó José C
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Social Stigma
Social stigma is disapproval of (or discontent with) a person based on socially characteristic grounds that are perceived, and serve to distinguish them, from other members of a society.Contents1 Description 2 Main theories and contributions2.1 Émile Durkheim 2.2 Erving Goffman 2.3 Gerhard Falk 2.4 Goffman's theory2.4.1 The stigmatized, the normal, and the wise 2.4.2 Ethical considerations2.4.2.1 The stigmatized 2.4.2.2 The stigmatizer2.5 Link and Phelan stigmatization model2.5.1 Differentiation and labeling 2.5.2 Linking to stereotypes 2.5.3 Us and them 2.5.4 Disadvantage 2.5.5 Necessity of power2.6 'Stigma allure' and authenticity 2.7 The Six Dimensions of Stigma 2.8 Types2.8.1 Deviance2.9 Stigma communication 2.10 Challenging3 Cu
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Legitimacy (family Law)
Legitimacy, in traditional Western common law, is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other, and of a child conceived before the parents obtain a legal divorce. Conversely, illegitimacy (or bastardy) has been the status of a child born outside marriage, such a child being known as a bastard, or love child, when such a distinction has been made from other children. Depending on local legislation, legitimacy can affect a child's rights of inheritance to the putative father's estate and the child's right to bear the father's surname or hereditary title
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Estancia
An estancia (American Spanish: [esˈtansja]) or estância (Brazilian Portuguese: [iʃˈtɐ̃sjɐ]) is a Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese term describing private landholdings. In some areas, they were large rural complexes with similarities to what in the United States is called a ranch. They are large farms which are spread over extensive areas, often 10,000 ha. Estancias in the southern South American grasslands, the pampas, have historically been estates used to raise livestock (cattle or sheep).Contents1 History1.1 California mission estancias2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In the early Caribbean territories and Mexico, holders of encomiendas acquired land in the area where they had access to Indian labor. They needed on-site Hispanic supervisors or labor bosses called estancieros
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