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Eustache De Saint Pierre
Eustache de Saint Pierre
Eustache de Saint Pierre
is the best known figure of the group of six known as The Burghers of Calais, the first to volunteer and surrender, wearing "a shirt and a rope around his neck" to the King of England at that time, Edward III, to save the people of Calais
Calais
(August 1347). According to the chronicler Jean Froissart, the king pardoned him at the request of his wife, Philippa of Hainault. The scene of the surrender of the mayor of Calais
Calais
was immortalized in a bronze statue by Rodin
Rodin
and can be seen in twelve copies, including the Belfry square in Calais, the Victoria Tower Gardens
Victoria Tower Gardens
adjoining Parliament in London, or at the art museum Glyptotek
Glyptotek
in Copenhagen (Denmark), and the Rodin
Rodin
Museum in Paris.This article does not cite any sources
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Jean-Simon Berthélemy
Jean-Simon Berthélemy
Jean-Simon Berthélemy
(5 March 1743 – 1 March 1811) was a French history painter who was commissioned to paint allegorical ceilings for the Palais du Louvre, the Luxembourg Palace
Luxembourg Palace
and others,[1] in a conservative Late Baroque-Rococo manner only somewhat affected by Neoclassicism. Biography[edit]Denis Diderot's bust and young manReclining Bacchante Playing the CymbalsBerthélemy was born in Laon, Aisne, the son of a sculptor, Jean-Joseph Berthélemy,. He trained in the atelier of Noel Hallé, a professor at the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture
Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture
and made his first reputation in the 1760s; after reaching second place in 1763, he won the Prix de Rome
Prix de Rome
of the Académie in 1767
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Edward III
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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Jean Froissart
Jean Froissart
Jean Froissart
(Old French, Middle French Jehan, c. 1337 – c. 1405) was a French-speaking medieval author and court historian from the Low Countries, who wrote several works, including Chronicles and Meliador, a long Arthurian romance, and a large body of poetry, both short lyrical forms, as well as longer narrative poems. For centuries, Froissart's Chronicles
Froissart's Chronicles
have been recognised as the chief expression of the chivalric revival of the 14th century Kingdom of England
England
and Kingdom of France
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Philippa Of Hainault
Philippa of Hainault
Philippa of Hainault
(Middle French: Philippe de Hainaut; 24 June[1] c.1310/15[2] – 15 August 1369) was Queen of England as the wife of King Edward III.[3] Edward promised in 1326 to marry her within the following two years.[4] She was married to Edward, first by proxy, when Edward dispatched the Bishop of Coventry
Bishop of Coventry
"to marry her in his name" in Valenciennes
Valenciennes
(second city in importance of the county of Hainaut) in October 1327.[5] The marriage was celebrated formally in York Minster
York Minster
on 24 January 1328, some months after Edward's accession to the throne of England. In August 1328, he also fixed his wife's dower.[6] Philippa acted as regent in 1346,[7] when her husband was away from his kingdom, and she often accompanied him on his expeditions to Scotland, France, and Flanders
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Rodin
François Auguste René Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917), known as Auguste Rodin
Auguste Rodin
(/oʊˈɡuːst roʊˈdæ̃/; French: [oɡyst ʁɔdɛ̃]), was a French sculptor[1]. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture,[2] he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition,[3] although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art. Sculpturally, Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with predominant figurative sculpture traditions, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic
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Victoria Tower Gardens
Victoria Tower
Victoria Tower
Gardens is a public park along the north bank of the River Thames
River Thames
in London. As its name suggests, is adjacent to the Victoria Tower, the south-western corner of the Palace of Westminster. The park, which extends southwards from the Palace to Lambeth Bridge, sandwiched between Millbank
Millbank
and the river, also forms part of the Thames Embankment. Victoria Tower
Victoria Tower
Gardens is a Grade II* listed park created in 1864–1870, following the embankment of the Thames
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Glyptotek
The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
(Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve and theke, a storing-place) is an art museum in Copenhagen, Denmark
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Copenhagen
Copenhagener [3]Time zone CET (UTC+1) • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)Postal code 1050–1778, 2100, 2150, 2200, 2300, 2400, 2450, 2500Area code(s) (+45) 3Website www.kk.dkCopenhagen[a] (Danish: København [købm̩ˈhɑwˀn] ( listen); Latin: Hafnia) is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. The city has a population of 775,033 (as of January 2018[update]), of whom 613,288 live in the Municipality of Copenhagen.[6][7] Copenhagen
Copenhagen
is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund
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Rodin Museum
Coordinates: 39°57′43″N 75°10′26″W / 39.962°N 75.174°W / 39.962; -75.174Rodin MuseumEntrance to Rodin MuseumEstablished November 29, 1929 (1929-11-29)Location 2151 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaCoordinates 39°57′43″N 75°10′26″W / 39.962°N 75.174°W / 39.962; -75.174Type Art museumWebsite www.rodinmuseum.org Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Register of Historic PlacesThe Rodin Museum
Rodin Museum
is an art museum located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that contains the largest collection of sculptor Auguste Rodin's works outside Paris
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Calais
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Calais
Calais
(UK: /ˈkæleɪ/, US: /kæˈleɪ/, traditionally /ˈkælɪs/; French: [kalɛ]; Picard: Calés; Dutch: Kales) is a town and major ferry port in northern France
France
in the department of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sub-prefecture. Although Calais
Calais
is by far the largest city in Pas-de-Calais, the department's prefecture is its third-largest city of Arras
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The Burghers Of Calais
Les Bourgeois de Calais
Calais
is one of the most famous sculptures by Auguste Rodin
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Eustache De Saint Pierre
Eustache de Saint Pierre
Eustache de Saint Pierre
is the best known figure of the group of six known as The Burghers of Calais, the first to volunteer and surrender, wearing "a shirt and a rope around his neck" to the King of England at that time, Edward III, to save the people of Calais
Calais
(August 1347). According to the chronicler Jean Froissart, the king pardoned him at the request of his wife, Philippa of Hainault. The scene of the surrender of the mayor of Calais
Calais
was immortalized in a bronze statue by Rodin
Rodin
and can be seen in twelve copies, including the Belfry square in Calais, the Victoria Tower Gardens
Victoria Tower Gardens
adjoining Parliament in London, or at the art museum Glyptotek
Glyptotek
in Copenhagen (Denmark), and the Rodin
Rodin
Museum in Paris.This article does not cite any sources
[...More...]

"Eustache De Saint Pierre" on:
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.