HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Eurypylus
In Greek mythology, Eurypylus /jʊəˈrɪpɪləs/ (Ancient Greek: Εὐρύπυλος Eurypylos) was the name of several different people:Eurypylus, was a Thessalian king, son of Euaemon and Ops. He was a former suitor of Helen thus he led the Thessalians during Trojan War.[1] Eurypylus, was son of Telephus
Telephus
and Astyoche.[2] Eurypylus, son of Poseidon
Poseidon
and king of Cos.[3] Eurypylus, another son of Poseidon
Poseidon
by the Pleiad Celaeno. He ruled over the Fortunate Islands.[4] Eurypylus, a son of Heracles
Heracles
and Eubote, daughter of Thespius.[5] Eurypylus, a son of Thestius
[...More...]

"Eurypylus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
[...More...]

"Greek Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Apollodorus Of Athens
Apollodorus of Athens
Athens
(Greek: Ἀπολλόδωρος ὁ Ἀθηναῖος, Apollodōros ho Athēnaios; c. 180 BC – after 120 BC) son of Asclepiades, was a Greek scholar, historian and grammarian. He was a pupil of Diogenes of Babylon, Panaetius
Panaetius
the Stoic, and the grammarian Aristarchus of Samothrace. He left (perhaps fled) Alexandria
Alexandria
around 146 BC, most likely for Pergamon, and eventually settled in Athens. Literary works[edit]Chronicle (Χρονικά), a Greek history in verse from the fall of Troy
Troy
in the 12th century BC to roughly 143 BC (although later it was extended as far as 109 BC), and based on previous works by Eratosthenes
Eratosthenes
of Cyrene. Its dates are reckoned by its references to the archons of Athens
[...More...]

"Apollodorus Of Athens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eurystheus
In Greek mythology, Eurystheus
Eurystheus
(/jʊəˈrɪsθiəs/; Greek: Εὐρυσθεύς meaning "broad strength" in folk etymology and pronounced [eu̯rystʰěu̯s]) was king of Tiryns, one of three Mycenaean strongholds in the Argolid, although other authors including Homer
Homer
and Euripides
Euripides
cast him as ruler of Argos.Contents1 Family 2 Mythology2.1 Labors of Heracles 2.2 Death3 Eurystheus
Eurystheus
in Euripides 4 Notes 5 SourcesFamily[edit] Eurystheus
Eurystheus
was the son of Sthenelus and the "victorious horsewoman" Nicippe, and he was a grandson of the hero Perseus, as was his opponent Heracles
[...More...]

"Eurystheus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
[...More...]

"Pausanias (geographer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dulichium
Dulichium, Dolicha, or Doliche[pronunciation?] (Ancient Greek: Δουλίχιον Doulichion)[1] was a place noted by numerous ancient writers that was either a city on, or an island off, the Ionian Sea
Ionian Sea
coast of Acarnania, Greece. In the Iliad, the Catalogue of Ships
Catalogue of Ships
says that Meges, son of Phyleus, led 40 ships to Troy
Troy
from Dulichium and the sacred islands he calls Echinae (the Echinades), which are situated beyond the sea, opposite Elis.[1] Phyleus was the son of Augeas, king of the Epeians in Elis, who emigrated to Dulichium because he had incurred his father's anger. In the Odyssey
Odyssey
however Dulichium is described as part of Odysseus's kingdom, not of Meges's kingdom
[...More...]

"Dulichium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Temenus
In Greek mythology, Temenus[pronunciation?] (Greek: Τήμενος, Tēmenos) was a son of Aristomachus and brother of Cresphontes
Cresphontes
and Aristodemus. Temenus
Temenus
was a great-great-grandson of Heracles
Heracles
and helped lead the fifth and final attack on Mycenae
Mycenae
in the Peloponnese. He became King of Argos. He was the father of Ceisus, Káranos, Phalces, Agraeus, and Hyrnetho
[...More...]

"Temenus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atalanta
Atalanta
Atalanta
(/ˌætəˈlæntə/; Greek: Ἀταλάντη Atalantē) is a character in Greek mythology, a virgin huntress, unwilling to marry, and loved by the hero Meleager. According to the Bibliotheca of pseudo-Apollodorus, Atalanta
Atalanta
was the daughter of Iasus, son of Lycurgus, and Clymene, daughter of Minyas.[2] She is also mentioned as the daughter of Mainalos or Schoeneus, according to (Hyginus), of a Boeotian (according to Hesiod), or of an Arcadian princess (according to the Bibliotheca). The Bibliotheca is the only source which gives an account of Atalanta’s birth and upbringing. King Iasus wanted a son; when Atalanta
Atalanta
was born, he left her on a mountaintop to die. Some stories say that a she-bear suckled and cared for Atalanta
Atalanta
until hunters found and raised her, and she learned to fight and hunt as a bear would
[...More...]

"Atalanta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hyrnetho
In Greek mythology, Hyrnetho was a daughter of Temenus, and the wife of Deiphontes, by whom she became mother of Antimenes, Xanthippus, Argeius, and Orsobia. Temenus
Temenus
favored his daughter Hyrnetho and her husband Deiphontes more than his sons, Hyrnetho's brothers, and planned on making Deiphontes his heir. His sons plotted against him and killed him, but nevertheless, the kingdom of Argos
Argos
passed to Deiphontes and Hyrnetho, since the army supported them rather than Temenus' sons;[1] alternately, the kingdom was seized by Ceisus, the eldest son of Temenus.[2] The brothers knew they would hurt their rival Deiphontes the most if they separated him from Hyrnetho. So Cerynes and Phalces, ignoring the objections of their youngest brother Agraeus, came to Epidaurus, where Hyrnetho and Deiphontes resided
[...More...]

"Hyrnetho" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Deiphontes
Deiphontes was king of Argos. He was a son of Antimachus, and husband of Hyrnetho, the daughter of Temenus the Heracleide, by whom he became the father of Antimenes, Xanthippus, Argeius, and Orsobia. Deiphontes was descended from Ctesippus, the son of Heracles by Deianira. Reign[edit] When Temenus, in the division of Peloponnesos, had obtained Argos as his share, he bestowed all his affections upon daughter Hyrnetho and her husband Deiphontes. His sons, who had reason to fear he would appoint him his successor, are said to have hired the Titans to murder their father. According to the Bibliotheca, after the death of Temenus, the army, abhorring the parricides, declared Deiphontes and Hyrnetho his rightful successors. Pausanias, however, reports a different story
[...More...]

"Deiphontes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heracles
Heracles
Heracles
(/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus[1] (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides[2] (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon[3] and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae
Heracleidae
(Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus
Commodus
and Maximian, often identified themselves
[...More...]

"Heracles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fortunate Islands
The Fortunate Isles or Isles of the Blessed[1][2] (Greek: μακάρων νῆσοι, makárōn nêsoi) were semi-legendary islands in the Atlantic Ocean, variously treated as a simple geographical location and as a winterless earthly paradise inhabited by the heroes of Greek mythology
[...More...]

"Fortunate Islands" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pleiades
The Pleiades
Pleiades
(/ˈplaɪədiːz/ or /ˈpliːədiːz/, also known as the Seven Sisters and Messier 45), are an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The cluster is dominated by hot blue and luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years
[...More...]

"Pleiades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theocritus
Theocritus
Theocritus
(/θiːˈɒkrɪtəs/; Greek: Θεόκριτος, Theokritos; fl. c. 270 BC), the creator of ancient Greek bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Bucolics and mimes 2.2 Epics 2.3 Lyrics 2.4 Spurious works3 Editions 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Little is known of Theocritus
Theocritus
beyond what can be inferred from his writings. We must, however, handle these with some caution, since some of the poems (Idylls; Εἰδύλλια) commonly attributed to him have little claim to authenticity. It is clear that at a very early date two collections were made: one consisting of poems whose authorship was doubtful yet formed a corpus of bucolic poetry, the other a strict collection of those works considered to have been composed by Theocritus
Theocritus
himself
[...More...]

"Theocritus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)
The Bibliotheca (Ancient Greek: Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.[1] The author was traditionally thought to be Apollodorus of Athens, but that attribution is now regarded as false, and so "Pseudo-" was added to Apollodorus. The Bibliotheca has been called "the most valuable mythographical work that has come down from ancient times".[2] An epigram recorded by the important intellectual Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
expressed its purpose:It has the following not ungraceful epigram: 'Draw your knowledge of the past from me and read the ancient tales of learned lore. Look neither at the page of Homer, nor of elegy, nor tragic muse, nor epic strain
[...More...]

"Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.