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European Windstorm
European windstorms are the strongest extratropical cyclones which occur across the continent of Europe.[2] They form as cyclonic windstorms associated with areas of low atmospheric pressure. They are most common in the autumn and winter months. On average, the month when most windstorms form is January. The seasonal average is 4.6 windstorms.[3] Deep low pressure areas are relatively common over the North Atlantic, sometimes starting as nor'easters off the New England coast, and frequently track across the North Atlantic Ocean towards western Europe, past the north coast of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
and into the Norwegian Sea. However, when they track further south, they can affect almost any country in Europe
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Electricity Generation
Electricity generation
Electricity generation
is the process of generating electric power from sources of primary energy. For electric utilities in the electric power industry, it is the first stage in the delivery of electricity to end users, the other stages being transmission, distribution, energy storage and recovery, using pumped-storage methods. A characteristic of electricity is that it is not a primary energy freely present in nature in remarkable amounts and it must be produced. Production is carried out in power plants. Electricity is most often generated at a power station by electromechanical generators, primarily driven by heat engines fueled by combustion or nuclear fission but also by other means such as the kinetic energy of flowing water and wind
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Central Europe
Central Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the central part of Europe. It is said to occupy continuous territory that are otherwise conventionally Eastern Europe
Europe
and Western Europe.[1][2][3] The concept of Central Europe
Europe
is based on a common historical, social and cultural identity.[4][5][6][7][8][7][9][10][11][12][13] Central Europe
Europe
is going through a phase of "strategic awakening",[14] with initiatives such as the CEI, Centrope
Centrope
and the Visegrád
Visegrád
Four
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North Atlantic Oscillation
The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a weather phenomenon in the North Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
of fluctuations in the difference of atmospheric pressure at sea level (SLP) between the Icelandic low
Icelandic low
and the Azores high. Through fluctuations in the strength of the Icelandic low
Icelandic low
and the Azores
Azores
high, it controls the strength and direction of westerly winds and location of storm tracks across the North Atlantic.[1] It is part of the Arctic oscillation, and varies over time with no particular periodicity.[citation needed] The NAO was discovered through several studies in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[2] Unlike the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean, the NAO is a largely atmospheric mode
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Surface Weather Analysis
Surface weather analysis
Surface weather analysis
is a special type of weather map that provides a view of weather elements over a geographical area at a specified time based on information from ground-based weather stations.[1] Weather
Weather
maps are created by plotting or tracing the values of relevant quantities such as sea level pressure, temperature, and cloud cover onto a geographical map to help find synoptic scale features such as weather fronts. The first weather maps in the 19th century were drawn well after the fact to help devise a theory on storm systems.[2] After the advent of the telegraph, simultaneous surface weather observations became possible for the first time, and beginning in the late 1840s, the Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
became the first organization to draw real-time surface analyses
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Romance-speaking Europe
Most languages of Europe
Europe
belong to the Indo-European language family. Out of a total population of 740 million (as of 2010), some 94% are native speakers of an Indo-European language; within Indo-European, the three largest phyla are Slavic, Germanic and Romance, with more than 200 million speakers each, between them accounting for close to 90% of Europeans. Smaller phyla of Indo-European found in Europe
Europe
include Hellenic (Greek, c. 10 million), Baltic (c. 7 million), Albanian (c. 5 million), Indo-Aryan (Romani, c. 1.5 million) and Celtic (c. 1 million). Five languages have more than 50 million native speakers in Europe: Russian, German, French, Italian and English. While Russian has the largest number of native speakers (more than 100 million in Europe), English in Europe
Europe
has the largest number of speakers in total, including some 200 million speakers of English as a second language. Of c
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Beaufort Scale
The Beaufort scale
Beaufort scale
/ˈboʊfərt/ is an empirical measure that relates wind speed to observed conditions at sea or on land. Its full name is the Beaufort wind force scale.Contents1 History 2 Modern scale 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The scale was devised in 1805 by the Irish hydrographer Francis Beaufort (later Rear Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort), a Royal Navy officer, while serving on HMS Woolwich
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Cognate
In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.[1] For example, the English word dish and the German word Tisch ("table"), are cognates because they both come from Latin discus, which relates to their flat surfaces. Cognates may have evolved similar, different or even opposite meanings. But, in most cases, there are some similar letters in the word. Some words sound similar, but don't come from the same root. These are called false cognates and are described in more detail below. In etymology, the cognate category excludes doublets and loanwords. The word cognate derives from the Latin
Latin
noun cognatus, which means "blood relative".[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Across languages 3 Within the same language 4 False cognates 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Cognates do not need to have the same meaning, which may have changed as the languages developed separately
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Deutsche Presse-Agentur
Deutsche Presse-Agentur
Deutsche Presse-Agentur
GmbH
GmbH
(DPA; German Press Agency) is a German news agency founded in 1949.[1] Based in Hamburg, it has grown to be a major worldwide operation serving print media, radio, television, online, mobile phones, and national news agencies. News is available in German, English, Spanish, and Arabic. The DPA is the largest press agency in Germany.[2] Along with the main office in Hamburg, there is a central news office in Berlin. The DPA has offices in some 100 countries, including 12 regional German bureaus along with 50 additional offices in Germany.[1]Contents1 History 2 Objective 3 German language
German language
service 4 Foreign language services 5 Cooperation with other news agencies 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The DPA began in 1949, succeeding the Deutsche Nachrichtenagentur and the Süddeutsche News Agency (Südena)
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Deutscher Wetterdienst
The Deutscher Wetterdienst
Deutscher Wetterdienst
(German pronunciation: [ˌdɔʏ̯ʧɐ ˈvɛtɐdiːnst]) or DWD for short, is the German Meteorological Office, based in Offenbach am Main, Germany, which monitors weather and meteorological conditions over Germany
Germany
and provides weather services for the general public and for nautical, aviational or agricultural purposes. It is attached to the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure. The DWDs principal tasks include warning against weather-related dangers and monitoring and rating climate changes affecting Germany. The organization runs atmospheric models on their supercomputer for precise weather forecasting
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Met Éireann
Met Éireann
Met Éireann
(Irish pronunciation: [mʲɛtʲ ˈeːrʲən̪ˠ], meaning "Met of Ireland") is the national meteorological service in Ireland, part of the Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government.Contents1 History 2 Activities2.1 Forecasting methodology 2.2 Observing stations 2.3 Aviation forecasting 2.4 Glamour3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Met ÉireannThe history of modern meteorology in Ireland dates back to 8 October 1860, when the first weather observations were transmitted from Valentia Observatory on Valentia Island
Valentia Island
in County Kerry
County Kerry
to the British Meteorological Office
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Met Office
The Met Office
Met Office
(officially the Meteorological Office until 2000)[1] is the United Kingdom's national weather service. It is an executive agency and trading fund of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy led by acting CEO[2], Nick Jobling and chief scientist, Professor Stephen Belcher
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Swedish Meteorological And Hydrological Institute
The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute
Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute
(Swedish: Sveriges meteorologiska och hydrologiska institut, abbreviated SMHI) is a Government agency in Sweden and operates under the Ministry of the Environment.[1] SMHI has expertise within the areas of meteorology, hydrology and oceanography, and has extensive service and business operations within these areas. Established in 1945, SMHI's head office is located in Norrköping. Prior to 1975 it was located in Stockholm
Stockholm
but after a decision taken in the Riksdag
Riksdag
in 1971 it was relocated to Norrköping
Norrköping
in 1975. SMHI also has offices in Gothenburg, Malmö, Sundsvall
Sundsvall
and Upplands Väsby. To the Swedish public SMHI is mostly known for the weather forecasts in the public-service radio provided by Sveriges Radio
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
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