HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
[...More...]

"Eurasia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Physical Geography
Physical geography
Physical geography
(also known as geosystems or physiography) is one of the two major sub-fields of geography.[1][2][3] Physical geography is that branch of natural science which deals with the study of processes and patterns in the natural environment like the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and geosphere, as opposed to the cultural or built environment, the domain of human geography.Contents1 Sub-branches 2 Journals and literature 3 Historical evolution of the discipline 4 Notable physical geographers 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksSub-branches[edit]A natural arch.Physical Geography
Geography
can be divided into several sub-fields, as follows: Geomorphology
Geomorphology
is the field concerned with understanding the surface of the Earth and the processes by which it is shaped, both at the present as well as in the past
[...More...]

"Physical Geography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleomagnetic
This term is also sometimes used for natural remanent magnetization.Magnetic stripes are the result of reversals of the Earth's field and seafloor spreading. New oceanic crust is magnetized as it forms and then it moves away from the ridge in both directions. The models show a ridge (a) about 5 million years ago (b) about 2 to 3 million years ago and (c) in the present.[1] Paleomagnetism
Paleomagnetism
(or palaeomagnetism in the United Kingdom) is the study of the record of the Earth's magnetic field
Earth's magnetic field
in rocks, sediment, or archeological materials. Certain minerals in rocks lock-in a record of the direction and intensity of the magnetic field when they form. This record provides information on the past behavior of Earth's magnetic field and the past location of tectonic plates
[...More...]

"Paleomagnetic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
[...More...]

"Demonym" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Subtropics
The subtropics are geographic and climate zones located roughly between the tropics at latitude 23.5° (the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
and Tropic of Capricorn) and temperate zones (normally referring to latitudes 35–66.5°) north and south of the Equator. Subtropical climates are often characterized by warm to hot summers and cool to mild winters with infrequent frost
[...More...]

"Subtropics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

First Millennium BC
The 1st millennium BC encompasses the Iron Age and sees the rise of many successive empires, and spanned from 1000 BC to 1 BC. The Neo-Assyrian Empire develops, followed by the Achaemenids. In Greece, Classical Antiquity begins with the colonization of Magna Graecia and peaks with the rise of Hellenism. The close of the millennium sees the rise of the Roman Empire. In South Asia, the Vedic civilization blends into the Maurya Empire. The early Celts dominate Central Europe while Northern Europe is in the Pre-Roman Iron Age. The Scythians dominate Central Asia. In China, the Spring and Autumn period sees the rise of Confucianism. Towards the close of the millennium, the Han Dynasty extends Chinese power towards Central Asia, where it borders on Indo-Greek and Iranian states. Yayoi period in Japanese islands. The Maya civilization rises in Central America, while in Africa, Ancient Egypt begins its decline, rise of the Nubian Empire, and Aksum's birth
[...More...]

"First Millennium BC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indus Valley
The Indus River
Indus River
(also called the Sindhū or Abāsīn) is one of the longest rivers in Asia. Originating in the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
in the vicinity of Lake Manasarovar
Lake Manasarovar
(China), the river runs a course through the Ladakh
Ladakh
region of Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir
(India), towards Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan
and the Hindukush ranges, and then flows in a southerly direction along the entire length of Pakistan
Pakistan
to merge into the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
near the port city of Karachi
Karachi
in Sindh.[1][2] It is the longest river and national river of Pakistan.[3] The river has a total drainage area exceeding 1,165,000 km2 (450,000 sq mi)
[...More...]

"Indus Valley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Craton
A craton ( /ˈkreɪtɒn/, /ˈkrætɒn/, or /ˈkreɪtən/;[1][2][3] from Greek: κράτος kratos "strength") is an old and stable part of the continental lithosphere, where the lithosphere consists of the Earth's two topmost layers, the crust and the uppermost mantle. Having often survived cycles of merging and rifting of continents, cratons are generally found in the interiors of tectonic plates. They are characteristically composed of ancient crystalline basement rock, which may be covered by younger sedimentary rock. They have a thick crust and deep lithospheric roots that extend as much as several hundred kilometres into the Earth's mantle. The term craton is used to distinguish the stable portion of the continental crust from regions that are more geologically active and unstable
[...More...]

"Craton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Northern Hemisphere
Coordinates: 90°0′0″N 0°0′0″E / 90.00000°N 0.00000°E / 90.00000; 0.00000 Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
shaded blue. The hemispheres appear to be unequal in this image due to Antarctica
Antarctica
not being shown, but in reality are the same size. Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
from above the North
North
PoleThe Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
is the half of Earth
Earth
that is north of the Equator
[...More...]

"Northern Hemisphere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ecosystem
An ecosystem can be defined as a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water and mineral soil.[2] However, ecosystems can be defined in many ways.[3] The biotic and abiotic components interact through nutrient cycles and energy flows.[4] Ecosystems include a network of interactions among organisms, and between organisms and their environment.[5] Ecosystems can be of any size but one ecosystem has a specific, limited space.[6] Some scientists view the entire planet as one ecosystem.[7] Energy, water, nitrogen and soil minerals are other essential abiotic components of an ecosystem. The energy that flows through ecosystems comes primarily from the sun, through photosynthesis. Photosynthesis also captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Animals also play an important role in the movement of matter and energy through ecoystems. They influence the amount of plant and microbial biomass that lives in the system
[...More...]

"Ecosystem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
[...More...]

"Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suez Canal
The Suez
Suez
Canal
Canal
(Arabic: قناة السويس‎ qanāt as-suwēs) is an artificial sea-level waterway in Egypt, connecting the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the Red Sea
Red Sea
through the Isthmus of Suez. Constructed by the Suez Canal Company
Suez Canal Company
between 1859 and 1869, it was officially opened on November 17, 1869. The canal offers watercraft a shorter journey between the North Atlantic
Atlantic
and northern Indian Oceans via the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Red seas by avoiding the South Atlantic
Atlantic
and southern Indian oceans, in turn reducing the journey by approximately 7,000 kilometres (4,300 mi)
[...More...]

"Suez Canal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ural Mountains
The Ural Mountains
Ural Mountains
(Russian: Ура́льские го́ры, tr. Uralskiye gory, IPA: [ʊˈralʲskʲɪjə ˈgorɨ]), or simply the Urals, are a mountain range that runs approximately from north to south through western Russia, from the coast of the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
to the Ural River
Ural River
and northwestern Kazakhstan.[1] The mountain range forms part of the conventional boundary between the continents of Europe
Europe
and Asia. Vaygach Island
Vaygach Island
and the islands of Novaya Zemlya
Novaya Zemlya
form a further continuation of the chain to the north into the Arctic Ocean. The mountains lie within the Ural geographical region and significantly overlap with the Ural Federal District
Ural Federal District
and with the Ural economic region
[...More...]

"Ural Mountains" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sea Of Marmara
The Sea of Marmara
Sea of Marmara
/ˈmɑːrmərə/ (Turkish: Marmara Denizi), also known as the Sea of Marmora or the Marmara Sea, and in the context of classical antiquity as the Propontis is the inland sea, entirely within the borders of Turkey, that connects the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Aegean Sea, thus separating Turkey's Asian and European parts. The Bosphorus
Bosphorus
strait connects it to the Black Sea
Black Sea
and the Dardanelles strait to the Aegean Sea. The former also separates Istanbul
Istanbul
into its Asian and European sides. The Sea of Marmara
Sea of Marmara
is the smallest sea in the world
[...More...]

"Sea Of Marmara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
[...More...]

"Classical Antiquity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philippines
Coordinates: 13°N 122°E / 13°N 122°E / 13; 122 Republic
Republic
of the Philippines Republika ng PilipinasFlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan at Makabansa"[1] "For God, People, Nature, and Country"Anthem: Lupang Hinirang Chosen LandGreat SealDakilang Sagisag ng Pilipinas  (Tagalog) Great Seal of the PhilippinesCapital Manilaa 14°35′N 120°58′E / 14.583°N 120.967°E / 14.583; 120.967Largest city
[...More...]

"Philippines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.