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Eumenes Of Pergamum
Eumenes II
Eumenes II
(/juːˈmɛniːz/; Greek: Εὐμένης Βʹ; ruled 197–159 BC) surnamed Soter meaning "Savior" was a ruler of Pergamon, and a son of Attalus I
Attalus I
Soter and queen Apollonis and a member of the Attalid dynasty
Attalid dynasty
of Pergamon.Contents1 Early life1.1 Campaigns2 Notes 3 ReferencesEarly life[edit] The eldest son of king Attalus I
Attalus I
and queen Apollonis, Eumenes was presumably born prior to 220 BC and was the eldest of 4 sons to Attalus I
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King
King
King
is the title given to a male monarch in a variety of contexts. The female equivalent is queen regnant,[1] while the title of queen on its own usually refers to the consort of a king.In the context of prehistory, antiquity and contemporary indigenous peoples, the title may refer to tribal kingship. Germanic kingship
Germanic kingship
is cognate with Indo-European traditions of tribal rulership (c.f
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Library Of Pergamum
The Library of Pergamum
Pergamum
in Pergamum, Turkey, was one of the most important libraries in the ancient world.[1]Contents1 The City of Pergamum 2 The Library of Pergamum 3 Decline 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksThe City of Pergamum[edit] Founded sometime prior to the Hellenistic Age, Pergamum
Pergamum
or Pergamon was an important ancient Greek city, located in Anatolia. It is now the site of the modern Turkish town, Bergama. Ruled by the Attalid dynasty, the city rose to prominence as an administrative center under King Eumenes II of Pergamum, who formed an alliance with the Roman Republic, severing ties with Macedonia. Pergamon
Pergamon
Acropolis, drawn by 19th century German archaeologistsUnder the rule of Eumenes II (197-160)[2] Pergamum
Pergamum
was a wealthy, developing city with a population of over 200,000 people
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Phrygia
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Lydia
Lydia
Lydia
(Assyrian: Luddu; Greek: Λυδία, Lydía; Turkish: Lidya) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of western Asia Minor
Asia Minor
located generally east of ancient Ionia
Ionia
in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland İzmir. Its population spoke an Anatolian language known as Lydian. Its capital was Sardis.[1] The Kingdom of Lydia
Lydia
existed from about 1200 BCE to 546 BCE. At its greatest extent during the 7th century BCE, it covered all of western Anatolia. In 546 BCE, it became a province of the Achaemenid Persian Empire, known as the satrapy of Lydia
Lydia
or Sparda in Old Persian
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Pisidia
Pisidia
Pisidia
(/pɪˈsɪdiə/; Greek: Πισιδία, Pisidía; Turkish: Pisidya) was a region of ancient Asia Minor
Asia Minor
located north of Lycia, bordering Caria, Lydia, Phrygia
Phrygia
and Pamphylia, and corresponding roughly to the modern-day province of Antalya
Antalya
in Turkey. Among Pisidia's settlements were Antioch(ia in Pisidia), Termessos, Cremna, Sagalassos, Etenna, Neapolis, Selge, Tyriacum, Laodiceia Katakekaumene and Philomelium.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Early history 2.2 Hellenistic period 2.3 Roman and Byzantine rule3 Notable people 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources and external linksGeography[edit] Although Pisidia
Pisidia
is close to the Mediterranean Sea, the warm climate of the south cannot pass the height of the Taurus Mountains
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Lycia
Lycia
Lycia
(Lycian: 𐊗𐊕𐊐𐊎𐊆𐊖 Trm̃mis; Greek: Λυκία, Lykía; Turkish: Likya) was a geopolitical region in Anatolia
Anatolia
in what are now the provinces of Antalya
Antalya
and Muğla on the southern coast of Turkey, and Burdur
Burdur
Province inland. Known to history since the records of ancient Egypt
Egypt
and the Hittite Empire
Hittite Empire
in the Late Bronze Age, it was populated by speakers of the Luwian language
Luwian language
group. Written records began to be inscribed in stone in the Lycian language
Lycian language
(a later form of Luwian) after Lycia's involuntary incorporation into the Achaemenid Empire in the Iron Age
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Pharnaces I
Pharnaces I (Greek: Φαρνάκης; lived 2nd century BC), fifth king of Pontus, was of Persian and Greek ancestry. He was the son of King Mithridates III of Pontus
Mithridates III of Pontus
and his wife Laodice, whom he succeeded on the throne.[1] Pharnaces had two siblings: a brother called Mithridates IV of Pontus and a sister called Laodice who both succeeded Pharnaces.[2] He was born and raised in the Kingdom of Pontus. Life[edit] The date of his accession cannot be fixed with certainty; but it is certain, at least, that he was on the throne before 183 BC, in which year he succeeded in reducing the important city of Sinope, which had been long an object of ambition to the Kings of Pontus
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Seleucus IV
Seleucus IV Philopator[1] (Greek: Σέλευκος Δ΄ Φιλοπάτωρ; c. 218 – 175 BC),[2] ruler of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire, reigned from 187 BC to 175 BC over a realm consisting of Syria
Syria
(now including Cilicia
Cilicia
and Judea), Mesopotamia, Babylonia
Babylonia
and Nearer Iran (Media and Persia).Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Taxes and assassination2 Ancestry 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] He was the second son and successor of Antiochus III the Great
Antiochus III the Great
and Laodice III. Seleucus IV wed his sister Laodice IV, by whom he had three children: two sons Antiochus, Demetrius I Soter
Demetrius I Soter
and a daughter Laodice V. He was compelled by financial necessities, created in part by the heavy war-indemnity exacted by Rome, to pursue an ambitious policy
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Antiochus III
Antiochus may refer to:Contents1 The Seleucid Empire 2 Kingdom of Commagene2.1 Princes of Commagene3 Others 4 See alsoThe Seleucid Empire[edit] Antiochus (father of Seleucus I Nicator) (born 4th-century BC), father of Seleucus I Nicator, founder of the Hellenstic Seleucid Empire Antiochus I Soter
Antiochus I Soter
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Ariarathes IV
Ariarathes IV, surnamed Eusebes, "the Pious", (Ancient Greek: Ἀριαράθης Εὐσεϐής, Ariaráthēs Eusebḗs), was the king of Cappadocia
Cappadocia
in 220–163 BC. Early life[edit] Ariarathes IV was the son of the king of Cappadocia
Cappadocia
Ariarathes III and his Greek Macedonian wife Stratonice.[1] He was a child at his accession, and reigned for about 57 years.[2] He married his cousin Antiochis, the daughter of Antiochus III the Great, king of Syria, and Laodice III, and, in consequence of this alliance, assisted Antiochus in his war against the Romans. After the defeat of Antiochus by the Romans in 190 BC, Ariarathes sued for peace in 188 BC, which he obtained on favourable terms, as his daughter, Stratonice, was about that time betrothed to Eumenes II, king of Pergamum, whom she later married, and became an ally of the Romans
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Cappadocia
Cappadocia
Cappadocia
(/kæpəˈdoʊʃə/; also Capadocia; Greek: Καππαδοκία, Kappadokía, from Old Persian: Katpatuka, Turkish: Kapadokya) is a historical region in Central Anatolia, largely in the Nevşehir, Kayseri, Kırşehir, Aksaray, and Niğde Provinces in Turkey. According to Herodotus,[1] in the time of the Ionian Revolt
Ionian Revolt
(499 BC), the Cappadocians were reported as occupying a region from Mount Taurus to the vicinity of the Euxine (Black Sea)
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Parchment
Parchment
Parchment
is a writing material made from specially prepared untanned skins of animals—primarily sheep, calves, and goats. It has been used as a writing medium for over two millennia
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Prusias I
Prusias I Cholus (Greek: Προυσίας ὁ Χωλός "the Lame") (lived c. 243 – 182 BC, reigned c
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Stoa Of Eumenes
The Stoa
Stoa
of Eumenes is a stoa on the acropolis of Athens, sited between the Odeion of Herodes Atticus
Odeion of Herodes Atticus
and the Theater of Dionysos. It was built against the slope of the hill (meaning it needed a retaining wall supported by piers and round arches. It is named after its builder, Eumenes II of Pergamum
Eumenes II of Pergamum
(whose brother Attalus II of Pergamum built the Stoa
Stoa
of Attalus in Athens's agora, probably commissioning it from the same architect). It was two-storied, 46m longer than the Stoa of Attalus and unlike it had no rooms behind its two-aisle hall, meaning it was designed for promenading rather than business. Originally marble-faced, its arcades were built into the 1060 Byzantine defensive wall and are still visible. It had Doric columns externally, Ionic columns on the ground-floor interior and Pergemene-type capitals on the top floor interior
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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