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Eugenie Scott
Eugenie Carol Scott (born October 24, 1945) is an American physical anthropologist, a former university professor and educator who has been active in opposing the teaching of young earth creationism and intelligent design in schools. From 1986 to 2014,[1] Scott served as the Executive Director of the National Center for Science Education, Inc., a nonprofit science education organization supporting teaching of evolutionary science. She holds a Ph.D. in biological anthropology from the University of Missouri. A biologist, her research has been in human medical anthropology and skeletal biology. Scott serves on the National Advisory Council of Americans United for Separation of Church and State.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Worldview 2.2 Authorship 2.3 Media appearances 2.4 Kitzmiller v
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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David Berlinski
David Berlinski (born 1942) is an American author and academic who opposes the scientific consensus on the theory of evolution. He is a senior fellow of the Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Academic career 3 Author3.1 Mathematics and biology3.1.1 Collaborations3.2 Fiction4 Evolution 5 Views on religion 6 Personal life 7 Bibliography7.1 Non-fiction books 7.2 Fiction books 7.3 Articles in peer-reviewed journals 7.4 Articles in journals and newspapers8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] David Berlinski was born in the United States in 1942 to German-born Jewish refugees who had immigrated to New York City after escaping from France as the Vichy government was collaborating with the Germans
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Secular Humanist
Secular humanism
Secular humanism
is a philosophy or life stance that embraces human reason, ethics, social justice, and philosophical naturalism while specifically rejecting religious dogma, supernaturalism, pseudoscience, and superstition as the bases of morality and decision making.[1][2][3][4] Secular humanism
Secular humanism
posits that human beings are capable of being ethical and moral without religion or a god. It does not, however, assume that humans are either inherently evil or innately good, nor does it present humans as being superior to nature. Rather, the humanist life stance emphasizes the unique responsibility facing humanity and the ethical consequences of human decisions. Fundamental to the concept of secular humanism is the strongly held viewpoint that ideology—be it religious or political—must be thoroughly examined by each individual and not simply accepted or rejected on faith
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Nontheist
Nontheism or non-theism is a range of both religious[1] and nonreligious[2] attitudes characterized by the absence of espoused belief in a God or gods. Nontheism has generally been used to describe apathy or silence towards the subject of God and differs from an antithetical, explicit atheism. Nontheism does not necessarily describe atheism or disbelief in God; it has been used as an umbrella term for summarizing various distinct and even mutually exclusive positions, such as agnosticism, ignosticism, ietsism, skepticism, pantheism, atheism, strong or positive atheism, implicit atheism, and apatheism
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Humanist Manifesto
Humanist Manifesto
Manifesto
is the title of three manifestos laying out a Humanist worldview. They are the original Humanist Manifesto
Manifesto
(1933, often referred to as Humanist Manifesto
Manifesto
I), the Humanist Manifesto
Manifesto
II (1973), and Humanism
Humanism
and Its Aspirations (2003, a.k.a. Humanist Manifesto
Manifesto
III). The Manifesto
Manifesto
originally arose from religious Humanism, though secular Humanists also signed. The central theme of all three manifestos is the elaboration of a philosophy and value system which does not necessarily include belief in any personal deity or "higher power", although the three differ considerably in their tone, form, and ambition
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University Of California Press
University of California
University of California
Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California
University of California
that engages in academic publishing. It was founded in 1893[2] to publish books and papers for the faculty of the University of California, established 25 years earlier in 1868. Its headquarters are located in Oakland, California. The University of California
University of California
Press currently publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, art, ancient world/classical studies, California
California
and the West, cinema & media studies, criminology, environmental studies, food and wine, history, music, politics, psychology, public health and medicine, religion, and sociology. It is a non-profit publishing arm of the University of California
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Niles Eldredge
Niles Eldredge (/ˈɛldrɛdʒ/; born August 25, 1943) is a U.S. biologist and paleontologist, who, along with Stephen Jay Gould, proposed the theory of punctuated equilibrium in 1972.Contents1 Education 2 Paleontology 3 Evolutionary theory 4 Personal life 5 Political Activism 6 Awards 7 Works 8 References 9 External linksEducation[edit] Eldredge began his undergraduate studies in Latin
Latin
at Columbia University. Before completing his degree he switched to the study of geology under Norman D. Newell. It was at this time that his work at the American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
began, under the combined Columbia University-American Museum graduate studies program. Eldredge graduated summa cum laude from Columbia College of Columbia University in 1965, and enrolled in the university's doctoral program while continuing his research at the museum
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Glenn Branch
Glenn Branch
Glenn Branch
is the Deputy Director of the National Center for Science Education. He is a prominent critic of creationism and intelligent design and an activist against campaigns of suppressing teaching of evolution and climate change in school education.[1][2]Contents1 Early life 2 Advocacy 3 Selected publications 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Branch earned his Masters of Arts degree in Philosophy from the University of California, Los Angeles
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Science (journal)
Science, also widely referred to as Science Magazine,[1] is the peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science[2][3] (AAAS) and one of the world's top academic journals.[4] It was first published in 1880, is currently circulated weekly and has a print subscriber base of around 130,000. Because institutional subscriptions and online access serve a larger audience, its estimated readership is 570,400 people.[5] The major focus of the journal is publishing important original scientific research and research reviews, but Science also publishes science-related news, opinions on science policy and other matters of interest to scientists and others who are concerned with the wide implications of science and technology. Unlike most scientific journals, which focus on a specific field, Science and its rival Nature cover the full range of scientific disciplines
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Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije d͡ʒumˈhuɾijeti] ( listen)), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia
Anatolia
in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.[7] Turkey
Turkey
is bordered by eight countries with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the northwest; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Iran
Iran
to the east; and Iraq
Iraq
and Syria
Syria
to the south
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Charles Darwin
Tertiary education: University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Edinburgh Medical School
(medicine, no degree) Christ's College, Cambridge
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Christian Science
Christian Science
Christian Science
is a set of beliefs and practices belonging to the metaphysical family of new religious movements.[n 2] It was developed in 19th-century New England
New England
by Mary Baker Eddy, who argued in her 1875 book Science and Health
Science and Health
that sickness is an illusion that can be corrected by prayer alone
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Golden Retriever
The Golden Retriever
Retriever
is a large-sized breed of dog bred as gun dogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such as ducks and upland game birds during hunting and shooting parties,[3] and were named 'retriever' because of their ability to retrieve shot game undamaged. Golden Retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards. They are a long-coated breed, with a dense inner coat that provides them with adequate warmth in the outdoors, and an outer coat that lies flat against their bodies and repels water. Golden Retrievers are well suited to residency in suburban or country environments. Although they need substantial outdoor exercise, they should be housed in a fenced area because of their instinctual tendency to roam.[4] They shed copiously, particularly at the change of seasons, and require fairly regular grooming. The breed is a prominent participant in conformation shows for purebred dogs
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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